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After 5 Days of cleaning, animating, moving, deleting, searching, bug finding... It is done! Hopefully theres nothing much to be done later but it may be something i've missed. 

Clearly tweaking the whole cavalry isn't a small thing, those are thousands of actors + a lot of animations.

Variants used by capes for cavalry:

Spoiler
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_2h_fast_ready.xml" name="Spearman-2h-Fast-Ready" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_2h_fast_relax.xml" name="Spearman-2h-Fast-Relax" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_2h_ready.xml" name="Spearman-2h-Ready" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_2h_relax.xml" name="Spearman-2h-Relax" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_fast_01.xml" name="Spearman-Fast-01" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_fast_02.xml" name="Spearman-Fast-02" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_fast_shield_01.xml" name="Spearman-Fast-Shield-01" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_fast_shield_02.xml" name="Spearman-Fast-Shield-02" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_fast_shield_aspis.xml" name="Spearman-Fast-Shield-Aspis" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_ready.xml" name="Spearman-Ready" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_ready_shield.xml" name="Spearman-Ready-Shield" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_relax_01.xml" name="Spearman-Relax-01" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_relax_02.xml" name="Spearman-Relax-02" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_relax_reverse_01.xml" name="Spearman-Relax-Reverse-01" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_relax_reverse_02.xml" name="Spearman-Relax-Reverse-02" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_relax_shield_01.xml" name="Spearman-Relax-Shield-01" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_relax_shield_02.xml" name="Spearman-Relax-Shield-02" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_relax_shield_reverse.xml" name="Spearman-Relax-Shield-Reverse" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_relax_shield_aspis.xml" name="Spearman-Relax-Shield-Aspis" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_spearman_relax_shield_aspis_reverse.xml" name="Spearman-Relax-Shield-Aspis-Reverse" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_swordsman_fast_ready.xml" name="Swordsman-Fast-Ready" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_swordsman_fast_ready_shield.xml" name="Swordsman-Fast-Ready-Shield" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_swordsman_fast_relax.xml" name="Swordsman-Fast-Relax" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_swordsman_fast_relax_shield.xml" name="Swordsman-Fast-Relax-Shield" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_swordsman_ready.xml" name="Swordsman-Ready" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_swordsman_ready_shield.xml" name="Swordsman-Ready-Shield" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_swordsman_ready_shield_aspis.xml" name="Swordsman-Ready-Shield-Aspis" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_swordsman_relax.xml" name="Swordsman-Relax" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_swordsman_relax_shield.xml" name="Swordsman-Relax-Shield" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_swordsman_relax_shield_aspis.xml" name="Swordsman-Relax-Shield-Aspis" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_javelin_fast.xml" name="Javelinist-Fast" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_javelin_relax.xml" name="Javelinist-Relax" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_archer_relax_back.xml" name="Archer-Relax-Back" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_archer_relax_hip.xml" name="Archer-Relax-Hip" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_archer_fast_back.xml" name="Archer-Relax-Back" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="biped/rider/cavalry/base_archer_fast_hip.xml" name="Archer-Relax-Hip" frequency="1"/>

You can copy this variants and replace the ones in your cavalry actors in order to match the new ones whitout too much trouble.

You can also use Notepad++ Search tool for replace in batch all actors whitout too much trouble like i've did, otherwise if i would have done it 1 by 1 it would had too me weeks to finish:

Spoiler

image.png

Red: Old variant example.

Blue: Replacement copying the variant.

For horses this are the new variants:

Spoiler
  •     <variant file="quadraped/base_horse_javelin_fast.xml"  name="Javelinist-Fast-Horse" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="quadraped/base_horse_archer_fast.xml" name="Archer-Fast-Horse" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="quadraped/base_horse_javelin.xml"  name="Javelinist-Horse" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="quadraped/base_horse_chariot.xml"  name="Chariot-Horse" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="quadraped/base_horse_archer.xml" name="Archer-Horse" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="quadraped/base_horse_trot.xml" name="Horse-Trot" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="quadraped/base_horse_pace.xml" name="Horse-Pace" frequency="1"/>
  •     <variant file="quadraped/base_horse_walk.xml" name="Horse-Walk" frequency="1"/>

 

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Here's the cavalry animations... I know it is quite late, but better than nothing: https://a.uguu.se/IP7Ov5YBmDhO_cavalryanimations.rar  (seems it expires in 24h), I could upload somewhere e

Since aspis remake i had problems finding the proper position of the pikeman shield, but also struggle every time i try to properly place a sheath or a quiver, so i had this plan: Add a fully prop

Hi @Alexandermb ! Glad to see new talented faces in the art department ! Sadly, I'm back just as a lurker (until the end of september or so) and perhaps I can provide art tech support or si

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  • 2 weeks later...

Been working slowly on improve Camel animations and armature with the new knowledge i have been gathering with animations since i've did my first updated with the camel.

So far i've reached enough material to only update camel but i want to deliver the camel with at least melee animations for modders and main game if its possible.

I need you guys to let me know wich factions could make use of a melee 2H spearman or Spear+Shield camel cavalry to make at least a placeholder entity and test it.

@wowgetoffyourcellphone @Sundiata @wackyserious @Genava55 @Nescio @Lion.Kanzen

Only the factions and the visual reference, not the history behind them because im very limited with internet and can't read often the forums too much crash and loading times for a single page.

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Camelry?

Hummm, Persians...Egyptians (Ptolemies), Parthians,  Nabateans , Palmyrene.

Spoiler

The first recorded use of the camel as a military animal was by the Arab king Gindibu, who is claimed to have employed as many as 1000 camels at the Battle of Qarqar in 853 BC. A later instance occurred in the Battle of Thymbra in 547 BC, fought between Cyrus the Great of Persia and Croesus of Lydia. According to Xenophon, Cyrus' cavalry were outnumbered by as much as six to one. Acting on information from one of his generals that the Lydian horses shied away from camels, Cyrus formed the camels from his baggage train into an ad hoc camel corps with armed riders replacing packs. Although not technically employed as cavalry, the smell and appearance of the camels was crucial in panicking the mounts of the Lydian cavalry and turning the battle in Cyrus' favor.[3]

More than sixty years later, the Persian king Xerxes I recruited a large number of Arab mercenaries into his massive army during the Second Persian invasion of Greece, all of whom were equipped with bows and mounted on camels. Herodotus noted that the Arab camelry, including a massive force of Libyan charioteers, numbered as many as twenty thousand men in total strength.

According to Herodian, the Parthian king Artabanus IV employed a unit consisted of heavily-armored soldiers equipped with spears (kontos) and riding on camels.[4]

Romans introduced camels in some of their North African military units under the Emperor Hadrian, during the second century.[citation needed] Camel troops or dromedarii were used during the late Roman Empire.

The camel was used in this way by many civilizations, particularly in the Middle East. As early as the 1st Century AD Nabatean and Palmyrene armies employed camel-mounted infantry and archers recruited from nomadic tribes of Arabian origin. Typically such levies would dismount and fight on foot rather than from camel-back.[5] Extensive use was made of camels during the initial campaigns of Muhammad and his followers.[6] Subsequently, the Arabs used camels effectively against their horse-mounted Sassanid and Byzantine enemies during the Muslim conquests.

 

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6 hours ago, Lion.Kanzen said:

Camelry?

Hummm, Persians...Egyptians (Ptolemies), Parthians,  Nabateans , Palmyrene.

  Reveal hidden contents

The first recorded use of the camel as a military animal was by the Arab king Gindibu, who is claimed to have employed as many as 1000 camels at the Battle of Qarqar in 853 BC. A later instance occurred in the Battle of Thymbra in 547 BC, fought between Cyrus the Great of Persia and Croesus of Lydia. According to Xenophon, Cyrus' cavalry were outnumbered by as much as six to one. Acting on information from one of his generals that the Lydian horses shied away from camels, Cyrus formed the camels from his baggage train into an ad hoc camel corps with armed riders replacing packs. Although not technically employed as cavalry, the smell and appearance of the camels was crucial in panicking the mounts of the Lydian cavalry and turning the battle in Cyrus' favor.[3]

More than sixty years later, the Persian king Xerxes I recruited a large number of Arab mercenaries into his massive army during the Second Persian invasion of Greece, all of whom were equipped with bows and mounted on camels. Herodotus noted that the Arab camelry, including a massive force of Libyan charioteers, numbered as many as twenty thousand men in total strength.

According to Herodian, the Parthian king Artabanus IV employed a unit consisted of heavily-armored soldiers equipped with spears (kontos) and riding on camels.[4]

Romans introduced camels in some of their North African military units under the Emperor Hadrian, during the second century.[citation needed] Camel troops or dromedarii were used during the late Roman Empire.

The camel was used in this way by many civilizations, particularly in the Middle East. As early as the 1st Century AD Nabatean and Palmyrene armies employed camel-mounted infantry and archers recruited from nomadic tribes of Arabian origin. Typically such levies would dismount and fight on foot rather than from camel-back.[5] Extensive use was made of camels during the initial campaigns of Muhammad and his followers.[6] Subsequently, the Arabs used camels effectively against their horse-mounted Sassanid and Byzantine enemies during the Muslim conquests.

 

Seleucids used them as well but as mounted archers. That is probably the question of Alexandermb, to know which civ could have used them as a melee cavalry. Arabs probably (Saba, Nabata etc.) and Persians because of Arabs mercenaries.

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8 minutes ago, Genava55 said:

Seleucids used them as well but as mounted archers. That is probably the question of Alexandermb, to know which civ could have used them as a melee cavalry. Arabs probably (Saba, Nabata etc.) and Persians because of Arabs mercenaries.

But have in mind future things like mini civs and possible mercenaries.

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8 hours ago, Alexandermb said:

Only the factions and the visual reference, not the history behind them because im very limited with internet and can't read often the forums too much crash and loading times for a single page.

Dromedaries were apparently first domesticated in Southern Arabia. Introduction of camels to the Nile Valley is a poorly understood. They're almost absent from Ancient Egyptian art, which is a little strange. Some, myself included believe this is because of cultural reasons. They may have considered it an unclean, or even "offensive" animal. It was occasionally depicted though, so they knew what a camel was. Camels are used primarily by desert nomads or pastoralists in arid regions, and people who were used to life along the Nile, avoid the desert. From the Ptolemaic Period onwards, camels are better attested, possibly because of the Nabataean and Bedouin connection, and Greek connections across the Middle East.

There seem to have been wild camels in East Africa since Pre-Historic times. I was surprised to find out recently that camel bones were found in Neolithic sites in Nubia. It's very possible that these were wild ancestors of domestic camels that were being hunted, although the spread of domestic dromedaries is not yet fully understood, and domestic dromedaries appear at very early dates in Somalia as well (Sudan and Somalia are home to about 70% of the total world population of camels today). It's possible these wild camels were hunted to extinction. Camels start (re-)appearing more frequently in the archaeological record of Lower Nubia from the early Napatan Period (at Qasr Ibrim), possibly even earlier in the 1st millennium BC. Actual depictions of camels in Kushite art only seem to appear in the 1st century BC, Meroitic Period, and they are depicted with riding gear. Perhaps these depictions simply illustrate growing influence of the Blemmyes, and an abandonment of the pharaonic taboo on camels (one Meroitic royal chapel features a fine relief of a camel, unheard of in Egyptian art).

At what point camels were first employed in a military context by Kushites (or their "foreign" levies/mercenaries from the arid regions East of the Nile/Nubian Desert) is entirely unknown to me. I suspect they would have been employed in such a context as early as they were adopted by the Eastern Desert peoples. Kushites faced camels in a military context as early as the Kushite-Assyrian wars of the 7th century BC. It's generally believed that Egyptians started adopting camels in larger numbers after the Persian conquest of Egypt in the 6th century BC. 

How they were equipped is difficult to say with confidence, but more recent Beja camel forces were equipped primarily with lances, javelins, swords, round shields and linen/cotton wrapped around the waist. There are a very large amount of crude graffito from Meroë and Musawwarat es Sufra depicting camel warriors, but these pieces are very difficult to date. Most of them are believed to be medieval, and depict mostly swordsmen on camelback. 

Domestic camels seem to be absent from the North Western Sahara until the the first century BC. Carthaginians are not known to have used them. Interestingly Julius Caesar actually captured 22 camels from King Juba of Numidia in the 1st century BC, North West Africa. 

Oddly camels are well represented in Central and South Western Saharan rock art. The so called "Camel Period" in Saharan rock art is believed to begin around 1000 BC, about 2 centuries after the beginning of the "Horse Period", 1200 BC (although the dates are still debated). These are depictions of warriors on camel back, carrying spears, round shields, swords and sometimes feathers in their hair, some perhaps wearing turbans. They look like "proto-Tuaregs" and are closely related to Libyan warrior figures, but are found as far south as Niger and Chad. Very possibly/probably there is a Garamantian connection, although outside of this rock art which also exists in Libya, little is known about the importance of camels in the Western Sahara before the common era. 

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10 hours ago, Alexandermb said:

I need you guys to let me know wich factions could make use of a melee 2H spearman or Spear+Shield camel cavalry to make at least a placeholder entity and test it.

Only desert-dwelling peoples (“Arabs”) fought from dromedary camel-back; they occassionally served as auxiliaries or mercenaries for (or against) larger empires (Assyrians, Persians, Seleucids), but there is not really a need to create separate actors for different civilizations. Basically:

  • Arab camel archer
  • Arab camel javelineer
  • Arab camel spearman (just in case)
  • Arab camel swordsman
    • The sword in question was very long (four cubits) and very thin; basicallly it was 2 meter-long needle, probably only useful for piercing; see Livy below.

Arab camels serving in Xerxes I's army (480 BC) are attested by Herodotus:

Spoiler

69. Ἀράβιοι δὲ ζειρὰς ὑπεζωσμένοι ἦσαν, τόξα δέ παλίντονα εἶχον πρὸς δεξιά, μακρά. Αἰθίοπες δὲ παρδαλέας τε καὶ λεοντέας ἐναμμένοι, τόξα δὲ εἶχον ἐκ φοίνικος σπάθης πεποιημένα, μακρά, τετραπηχέων οὐκ ἐλάσσω, ἐπὶ δὲ καλαμίνους ὀιστοὺς μικρούς· ἀντὶ δὲ σιδήρου ἐπῆν λίθος ὀξὺς πεποιημένος, τῷ καὶ τὰς σφρηγῖδας γλύφουσι· πρὸς δὲ αἰχμὰς εἶχον, ἐπὶ δὲ κέρας δορκάδος ἐπῆν ὀξὺ πεποιημένον τρόπον λόγχης· εἶχον δὲ καὶ ῥόπαλα τυλωτά. τοῦ δὲ σώματος τὸ μὲν ἥμισυ ἐξηλείφοντο γύψῳ ἰόντες ἐς μάχην, τὸ δὲ ἄλλο ἥμισυ μίλτῳ. Ἀραβίων δὲ καὶ Αἰθιόπων τῶν ὑπὲρ Αἰγύπτου οἰκημένων ἦρχε Ἀρσάμης ὁ Δαρείου καὶ Ἀρτυστώνης τῆς Κύρου θυγατρός, τὴν μάλιστα στέρξας τῶν γυναικῶν Δαρεῖος εἰκὼ χρυσέην σφυρήλατον ἐποιήσατο.

69. The Arabians wore mantles girded up, and carried at their right side long bows curving backwards. The Ethiopians were wrapt in skins of leopards and lions, and carried bows made of palm-wood strips, full four cubits long, and short arrows therewith, pointed not with iron but with a sharpened stone, that stone wherewith seals are carved; moreover they had spears pointed with a gazelle’s horn sharpened to the likeness of a lance, and studded clubs withal. When they went into battle they painted half their bodies with gypsum and the other half with vermilion. The Arabians, and the Ethiopians who dwell above Egypt, had for commander Arsames son of Darius and Artystone daughter of Cyrus, whom Darius loved best of his wives, and had an image made of her of hammered gold.

[...]

86. This is their manner of fighting; their place in the army was with the Persians. The Median horse were equipped like their foot, and the Cissians likewise. The Indians were armed in like manner as their foot; they rode swift horses and drove chariots drawn by horses and wild asses. The Bactrians were equipped as were their foot, and the Caspians in like manner. The Libyans too were armed like the men of their infantry, and all of them too drove chariots. So likewise the Caspians and Paricanians were armed as the men of their infantry. The Arabians had the same equipment as the men of their infantry, and all of them rode on camels no less swift than horses.

87. Ταῦτα τὰ ἔθνεα μοῦνα ἱππεύει. ἀριθμὸς δὲ τῆς ἵππου ἐγένετο ὀκτὼ μυριάδες, πάρεξ τῶν καμήλων καὶ τῶν ἁρμάτων. οἱ μέν νυν ἄλλοι ἱππέες ἐτετάχατο κατὰ τέλεα, Ἀράβιοι δὲ ἔσχατοι ἐπετετάχατο· ἅτε γὰρ τῶν ἵππων οὔτι ἀνεχομένων τὰς καμήλους, ὕστεροι ἐτετάχατο, ἵνα μὴ φοβέοιτο τὸ ἱππικόν.

87. These nations alone are riders; and the number of the horsemen was shown to be eighty thousand, besides the camels and the chariots. All the rest of the riders were ranked in their several troops, but the Arabians were posted hindmost; for the horses not enduring the sight of camels, their place was in the rear, that so the horses might not be affrighted.

— Herodotus Histories VII.69, 86–87 (text and translation A. D. Godley 1922)

Arab camels serving in Antiochus III's army at the battle of Magnesia (190 BC) are attested by Livy:

Spoiler

ante hunc equitatum falcatae quadrigae et cameli, quos appellant dromadas. his insidebant Arabes sagittarii, gladios tenuis habentes longos quaterna cubita, ut ex tanta altitudine contingere hostem possent.

In front of this cavalry were scythe-bearing chariots and camels of the breed called dromedaries. These were ridden by Arab archers carrying slender swords four cubits long, that they might be able to reach the enemy from so great a height.

— Livy Ab Urbe Condita XVII.40 (text W. Weissenborn, H. J. Müller 1911; translation E. T. Sage 1935)

and by Appian, apparently deriving from the same source:

Spoiler

[...] ἱπποτοξόται τε ἐπὶ τοῖσδε ἕτεροι, Δᾶαι καὶ Μυσοὶ καὶ Ἐλυμαῖοι καὶ Ἄραβες, οἳ καμήλους ὀξυτάτας ἐπικαθήμενοι τοξεύουσί τε εὐμαρῶς ἀφ᾽ ὑψηλοῦ, καὶ μαχαίραις, ὅτε πλησιάζοιεν, ἐπιμήκεσι καὶ στεναῖς χρῶνται. δρεπανηφόρα τε ἅρματα ἐν τῷ μεταιχμίῳ, προπολεμεῖν τοῦ μετώπου, ἐτετάχατο: καὶ εἴρητο αὐτοῖς μετὰ τὴν πρώτην πεῖραν ὑποχωρεῖν.

[...] There were also other mounted archers from the Dahæ, Mysia, Elymaïs, and Arabia, riding on swift camels, who shot arrows with dexterity from their high position, and used very long thin knives when they came to close combat. Antiochus also placed scythe-bearing chariots in the space between the armies to begin the battle, with orders to retire after the first onset.

— Appian The Syrian Wars 32 (text L. Mendelssohn 1879; translation H. White 1899)

Although it's possible Arab camels served in a Ptolemaic army (the Nabateans were allied with them), I don't know of any actual evidence for that.

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Here's a depiction of a camel from the pyramid chapel of King Arikhankharer, (Begrawiya, pyramid 10), c. 15 AD:

Kingdom of Kush Kushite camel relief.jpg

Note that it's already highly developed, stylistically, indicating a longer standing familiarity with the subject.

 

Here's a Meroitic bronze figurine of camel belonging to King Natakamani, Arikhankarer's father and predecessor, from Pyramid 5, Begrawiya, "around or earlier than 1 BC to c. 20 AD"

Kingdom of Kush Kushite bronze camel figurine meroitic period.jpg

07_arts_lion.jpg

Again, note the developed nature of the style, anatomy and seating position.  

 

The above saddle is comparable to the post Meroitic saddle from Qustul:

1Saddle,_Nubia,_Qustul,_Cemetery_L,_Noubadian,_X-Group_culture,_c._375_AD,_described_as_the_world's_oldest_known_saddle_to_use_a_frame_-_Oriental_Institute_Museum,_University_of_Chicago_-_DSC08071.jpg

 

Most of the camel graffito at Musawwarat are believed to be medieval, but some are believed to be Meroitic. In particular, those figurines where the rider is placed in front of the hump. From the post Meroitic period, apparently they started sitting on top of the hump, although the above shared camel figurine depicts a camel with saddle on top of its hump, so the dating criteria might need some nuancing.

Screen Shot 2017-07-27 at 12.29.41.png

 

Camels were even of importance to the Nobatae (or Noba, related to the modern Nuba of Kordofan), who start forming some kind of military aristocracy in Kush from the late Meroitic period, and were sometimes buried with large numbers of camel sacrifices in the AD period.

Basically for the Blemmyes mercenary camels in the Kushite roster, Beja camel riders should be your main source of inspiration. They're the descendants of the Blemmyes and the Medjay and still maintained a very archaic culture up till the early 20th century, sometimes still wearing the distinctive wrapped linnen or cotton cloths around their waist, and still sporting the same half afro-half locked hairstyle they're depicted with in Meroitc scenes. They even maintained pre-islamic and pre-christian religious traditions to a degree into recent times. For weapons, swords, lances and javelins were preferred. I'd love to add bow and arrows to that but I haven't come across anything like that before in Sudan. 

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4 hours ago, Lion.Kanzen said:

Yes, lancer, which civ ?, traditions, Saharan I guess but I'm not African or desert expert.

In 0AD's timeframe "Bedouins" were largely confined to the Eastern deserts of Egypt and primarily Arabia. Essentially Nescio's "Arabs". The nomads of the Deserts West of the Nile are distinguished as "Libyan", another very broad term. 

 

4 hours ago, Lion.Kanzen said:

This can be a good representation of Garamantian, did garamantian use camelry as melee camelry?

There's this weird popular mantra that Romans introduced camels to (North) Africa in the AD period, insinuating that Garamantes didn't use camels in the BC period. But even Roman sources place camels among the indigenous people of the North Western Sahara by the first century BC latest... Libyan (and other Saharan) rock art also says otherwise, and depicts camels from the so-called "Camel Period" which may have started as early as 1000 BC. 

Lances and javelins are most common: 

Libyan-Rock-Art-Camels.jpg

CHAENP0100035.jpg

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included enough animations for Swordsman, Spearman, Javelinist, Archer, Lancer. Shield and No Shield Variant. New Death animation, new sitting idle animation for fauna camel.

Overall improvement of the camel animations and mesh fixing some issues such as gathering meat legs being broken.

Will notify when i upload the files.

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