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The difference between the Persian women in the game & in the reality


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Hello

Please look at this picture which had been taken from the Persepolis:

xI3UPPRCePLLpLyD-v-kfUS4y_lxqNWQXkNvzYx-

See? There is a historical mistake in the game. The Persian women's clothing was this. Not the clothing that we can see in the game. I think their 3D models should be edited. Of course, it is just a suggestion to help improving the game:)!

:bye::heart:

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4 minutes ago, shiraz said:

Hello

Please look at this picture which had been taken from the Persepolis:

xI3UPPRCePLLpLyD-v-kfUS4y_lxqNWQXkNvzYx-

See? There is a historical mistake in the game. The Persian women's clothing was this. Not the clothing that we can see in the game. I think their 3D models should be edited. Of course, it is just a suggestion to help improving the game:)!

:bye::heart:

Thank you for your nice find. @Stan` @wackyserious

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13 minutes ago, shiraz said:

Hello

Please look at this picture which had been taken from the Persepolis:

xI3UPPRCePLLpLyD-v-kfUS4y_lxqNWQXkNvzYx-

See? There is a historical mistake in the game. The Persian women's clothing was this. Not the clothing that we can see in the game. I think their 3D models should be edited. Of course, it is just a suggestion to help improving the game:)!

:bye::heart:

Hello and welcome to the forums!

Thanks for pointing this out! 0 A.D. is a work in progress, far from perfect, and containing numerous inaccurracies. Artists have to work from what they know, and if they don't have suitable source material, they have to invent something.

A few questions, though:

  • Where exactly in Persepolis is this image taken from?
  • Is the displayed person really Persian?
  • Is it really a woman?

Achaemenid imperial iconography portraits dozens of nationalities, each with different clothing, therefore more context would be helpful.

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Women’s clothing

Persian official monuments do not include represen­tations of women; accordingly, little is known of their costume in the Median and Achaemenid periods. There are, however, a few contemporary representations in other contexts: on a textile from Pazyryk (Figure 56; Rudenko, pp. 296-97, pl. 177c), Greco-Persian seals (Figure 57plate lxi; Gow, pl. X/1-6; Boardman, nos. 854, 879, 891-92, 964), ivory objects (plate lxii, plate lxiii; Amiet, pp. 173ff.; Dentzer, pp. 216ff.), the “Satrap sarcophagus” (plate lxiv; Kleemann, pp. 21-­23), the monuments from Ergili in northwestern Anatolia (Figure 58; Akurgal; Bernard), and small metal vessels (Figure 59; Culican; Gow, p. 137 and n. 14). There are also a few notices by ancient writers. Particularly informative is Ctesias’s reference to the wearing of the sárapis by Parysatis, mother of Artaxerxes II (Hinz, 1969, p. 74, with reference), Herodotus’ testimony (9.109) that Xerxes’s daughter-in-law asked him to give her a robe that his wife had woven for him, and Quintus Curtius’s remark that Darius III “was girt woman-fashion” with “a golden belt” (3.3.17). Indeed, the representations of women show that they usually wore the pleated “court dress” and the voluminous “Ionic” chiton (Gow, p. 137; Dentzer, figs. 7-8; Dalton, pp. xxxiii-xxxiv, and nos. 89, 93, 103, 104). Occasionally, as on some of the Ergili sculptures and the “Satrap sarcophagus,” they wore an overgarment that, like the modern čādor, covered the head and neck (Figure 58, plate lxiv). The face, however, was always uncovered. The hair was often worn in a single plait at the back (plate lxv). By far the best available documentation of women’s dress from the Achaemenid period is the remnants of actual clothing found in the Pazyryk tombs (Rudenko, pp. 91-98), though in that distant region Achaemenid influence may have been consid­erably attenuated and probably reinterpreted. Exca­vated garments include a short cape or caftan (Figure 60) made of squirrel skin with the fur side inward and bordered with a band of black coltskin; it has narrow sleeves decorated with patterns of applied leather pieces (Rudenko, pp. 91-92). Another was a hood (plate lxvi) of a double thickness of fine leather covered in black coltskin and ornamented with rhomboid leather appliqués; it reached to the shoulders (Rudenko, pp. 96ff., pl. 65A). Finally, two pairs of boots were found. One had fine red-leather tops and vamps stitched to soles decorated on the underside with fantastic patterns. The other was soft, knee-high, with broad cuffs of leopardskin, leather vamps, and thick, rigid leather soles ornamented on the underside (Rudenko, pp. 93-96). This curious feature was practical because the wearer “sat with legs arranged so that the heels were turned out,” as is still customary in Central Asia (Rudenko, p. 96).

Bibliography:

E. Akurgal, “Griechisch-persische Reliefs aus Daskyleion,” Iranica Antiqua 6, 1966, pp. 147-56.

P. Amiet, “Les ivoires achéménides de Suse,” Syria 49, 1972, pp. 167-91.

B. I. Arakelyan, “Klad serebryanykh izdeliĭ iz Erebuni,” Sovetskaya Arkheologiya, 1971/1, pp. 143-58, cited in P. O. Harper, The Royal Hunter. Art of the Sasanian Em­pire, New York, 1978.

W. Bailey, “Ariana,” in Donum Natalicium H. S. Nyberg Oblatum, Uppsala, 1954, pp. 1-16.

R. D. Barnett, “Assyria and Iran. The Earliest Representations of Persians,” in Survey of Persian Art, pp. 2997-3007. Idem, “Persepolis,” Iraq 19, 1957, pp. 55-77.

P. Beck, “A Note on the Reconstruction of the Achaemenid Robe,” Iranica Antiqua 9, 1972, pp. 116-22.

P. Bernard, “Les bas-reliefs gréco-perses de Dascylion à la lumière de nouvelles découvertes,” Revue d’archéologie 2, 1969, pp. 17-28.

F. W. von Bissing, “Totenstele eines persischen Grossen aus Memphis,” ZDMG 84, 1930, pp. 226-38.

K. Bittel, “Ein persischer Feueraltar aus Kappadokien,” in Satura. Früchte aus der Antiken Welt Otto Weinreich zum 13. März 1951 dargebracht, Baden-Baden, 1952, pp. 15-29.

S. Bittner, Tracht und Bewaffnung des persischen Heeres zur Zeit der Achaimeniden, 2nd ed., Munich, 1985.

A. D. H. Bivar, “Details and "Devices" from the Sassanian Sculptures,” Oriental Art, N.S. 5/1, 1959, pp. 11-14.

Idem, “A Persian Monument at Athens, and Its Con­nections with the Achaemenid State Seals,” in M. Boyce and I. Gershevitch, eds., W. B. Henning Memorial Volume, London, 1970, pp. 43-61.

J. Boardman, Greek Gems and Finger Rings, London, 1970.

J. Borchhardt, “Epichorische, gräko-persisch beeinflusste Reliefs in Kilikien. Studien zur Kunst an den Satrapenhöfen Kleinasiens,” Istanbuler Mitteilungen 18, 1968, pp. 161-211.

A. Bovon, “La représentation des guerriers perses et la notion de barbare dans la 1ère moitié du Ve siècle,” Bulletin de correspondance hellénique 87, 1963, pp. 579-602.

P. Calmeyer, “Vom Reisehut zur Kaiserkrone B. Stand der archäologischen Forschung zu den iranischen Kronen,” AMI, N.F. 10, 1977, pp. 168-90.

J. M. Cook, The Persian Empire, New York, 1983.

W. Culican, “Syro-Achaemenian Ampullae,” Iranica Antiqua 11, 1975, pp. 100-12.

O. M. Dalton, The Treasure of the Oxus, 3rd ed., London, 1964.

M. A. Dandamaev, Persien unter den ersten Achameniden (6. Jahrhundert v. Chr.), tr. H.-D. Pohl, Wiesbaden, 1976.

J. M. Dentzer, “Reliefs au banquet dans l’Asie Mineure de Ve siècle av. J. C.,” Revue d’archéologie 2, 1969, pp. 194-224.

M. Dieulafoy, L’Acropole de Suse, 2 vols., Paris, 1890-93.

C. T. Edmonds, “A Tomb in Kurdistan,” Iraq 1, 1934, pp. 183-92.

H. von Gall, “Persische and medische Stämme,” AMI, N.F. 5, 1972, pp. 261-83.

Idem, “Die Kopfbedeckung des persischen Ornats bei den Achämeniden,” AMI, N.F. 7, 1974, pp. 145-­61.

R. Ghirshman, Persia from the Origins to Alexander the Great, tr. S. Gilbert and J. Emmons, London, 1964.

H. Goetz, “The History of Persian Costume,” in Survey of Persian Art, pp. 2227-56.

B. Goldman, “Origin of the Persian Robe,” Iranica Antiqua 4, 1964, pp. 133-52.

A. S. F. Gow, “Notes on the Persae of Aeschylus,” The Journal of Hel­lenic Studies 48, 1928, pp. 133-58.

V. von Graeve, Der Alexandersarkophag und seine Werkstatt, Ber­lin, 1970.

P. O. Harper, The Royal Hunter. Art of the Sasanian Empire, New York, 1978.

E. Herzfeld, Iran in the Ancient East, London, 1941.

W. Hinz, Altiranische Funde und Forschungen, Berlin, 1969.

Idem, Darius und die Perser, 2 vols., Baden-Baden, 1976-79.

M. G. Houston, Ancient Egyptian, Mesopotamian and Persian Costume and Decora­tion, 2nd ed., London, 1954.

H. J. Kantor, “Achaemenid Jewelry in the Oriental Institute,” JNES 16, 1957, pp. 1-23.

I. Kleemann, Der Satrapensarkophag aus Sidon, Berlin, 1958.

E. R. Knauer, “Ex Oriente Vestimenta. Tracht­geschichtliche Beobachtungen zu Ärmelmantel and Ärmeljacke,” ANRW II, XII/3, 1985, pp. 578-741, esp. p. 607.

J. A. Lerner, “The Achaemenid Relief of Ahura Mazda in the Fogg Art Museum,” Bulletin of the Asia Institute of Pahlavi University (Shiraz), 2, 1971, pp. 19-35.

Idem, “A Painted Relief from Persepolis,” Archaeology 26, 1973, pp. 116-22.

Idem, “Some So-Called Achaemenid Objects from Pazyryk,” Source 10/4, 1991, pp. 8-15.

H. Luschey, “Studien zu dem Darius-Relief von Bisutun,” AMI, N.F. 1, 1968, pp. 63-94.

M. Mellink, “Anatolia,” in CAH 2 IV, pp. 211-33.

P. R. S. Moorey, “The Iranian Contribution to Achaemenid Material Culture,” Iran 23, 1985, pp. 21-37.

T. Nöldeke, “Zum Herodot,” Klio 18, 1923, pp. 1-5.

V. Pisani, “Altpers. -va-, avest. anai-im, lat. sura,” ZDMG 96, 1942, pp. 82-83.

E. Porada, “Classical Achaemenid Architecture and Sculpture,” in Camb. Hist. Iran II, pp. 793-827.

G. Rawlinson, The Five Great Monarchies of the Ancient World IV, London, 1867.

A. Roes, “The Achaemenid Robe,” Bibliotheca Orientalis 8, 1951, pp. 137-41.

P. Roos, “An Achaemenian Sketch Slab and the Ornaments of the Royal Dress at Persepolis,” East and West 20, 1970, pp. 51-59.

M. Rostovtzeff, Iranians and Greeks in South Russia, Oxford, 1922.

S. I. Rudenko, Frozen Tombs of Siberia. The Pazyryk Burials of Iron Age Horsemen, tr. M. W. Thompson, Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1970.

F. Sarre and E. Herzfeld, Iranische Felsreliefs, Berlin, 1910.

E. F. Schmidt, Persepolis, 3 vols., Chicago, 1953-70.

R. Schmitt, “Perser und Persisches in der alten attischen Komödie,” Orientalia J. Duchesne-Guillemin Emerito Oblata, Acta Iranica 23, Leiden, 1984, pp. 459-72.

H. Schoppa, Die Darstellung der Perser in der griechischen Kunst bis zum Beginn des Hellenismus, Coburg, Germany, 1933.

A. Sh. Shahbazi, The Irano-Lycian Monuments, Tehran, 1975.

Idem, Persepolis Illustrated, Tehran, 1976.

Idem, “New Aspects of Persepolitan Studies,” Gymnasium 85, 1978, pp. 487-500.

Idem, “Darius in Scythia and Scythians in Persepolis,” AMI, N.F. 15, 1982, pp. 189-235.

C. G. Starr, “Greeks and Persians in the Fourth Century B.C. A Study in Cultural Contacts before Alexander,” Iranica Antiqua 12, 1977, pp. 49-115.

D. Stronach, “La statue de Darius le Grand découverte à Suse,” CDAFI 4, 1974, pp. 61-72.

G. Thompson, “Iranian Dress in the Achaemenian Period. Problems Concerning the Kandys and Other Garments,” Iran 3, 1965, pp. 121-26.

A. B. Tilia, Studies and Restorations at Persepolis and Other Sites of Fārs, 2 vols., Istituto Italiano per il Medio ed Estremo Oriente, Reports and Memoirs 16, 18, Rome, 1972-78.

G. Walser, Die Völkerschaften auf den Reliefs von Persepolis. Historische Studien über den sogenannten Tributzug an der Apadanatreppe, Berlin, 1966.

G. Widengren, “Some Remarks on Riding Costume and Articles of Dress among Iranian Peoples in Antiquity,” in Arctica, Studia Ethnographica Upsaliensia 11, 1956, pp. 228-76.

F. Winter, Das Alexandermosaik aus Pompeji, Strassburg, 1909.

(Shapur Shahbazi)

Originally Published: December 15, 1992

Last Updated: October 21, 2011

This article is available in print.
Vol. V, Fasc. 7, pp. 723-737

Cite this entry:

Shapur Shahbazi, “CLOTHING ii. In the Median and Achaemenid periods,”Encyclopaedia Iranica, V/7, pp. 723-737, available online at http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/clothing-ii (accessed on 30 December 2012).

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I dont see any source about this. More than Iranica Online and some controversial

Quote

A chādor (Persian: چادر‎), also variously spelled in English as chadah, chad(d)ar, chader, chud(d)ah, chadur, and naturalized as /tʃʌdə(ɹ)/, is an outer garment or open cloak worn by many women in Iran, Iraq, and some other countries under the Persianate cultural sphere, as well as predominantly Shia areas in public spaces or outdoors. A chador is a full-body-length semicircle of fabric that is open down the front. This cloth is tossed over the woman's or girl's head and she holds it closed in the front. The chador has no hand openings, or any buttons, clasps, etc., but rather, it is held closed by her hands or tucked under the wearer's arms.

Before the 1978–1979 Iranian Revolution, black chadors were reserved for funerals and periods of mourning. Colorful, patterned fabrics were the norm for everyday wear. Currently, the majority of Iranian women who wear the chador use the black version outside, and reserve light-coloured chadors for indoor use.

Quote

Fadwa El Guindi locates the origin of the veil in ancient Mesopotamia, where "wives and daughters of high-ranking men of the nobility had to veil".[1] The veil marked class status, and this dress code was regulated by sumptuary laws.

 

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Basically, the excerpt from Iranica Online sum it up well. There are plenty of variation and use in their clothing according to their social ranks or the context.

The wikipedia page about the veil gives other indications:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veil

So I don't think the current depiction of Persian women is that wrong. Maybe we can enhance it and diversify it.

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6 minutes ago, Genava55 said:

Basically, the excerpt from Iranica Online sum it up well. There are plenty of variation and use in their clothing according to their social ranks or the context.

The wikipedia page about the veil gives other indications:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veil

So I don't think the current depiction of Persian women is that wrong. Maybe we can enhance it and diversify it.

I agree.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwi1wJOZzJDqAhV5QjABHf5tDAEQFjAYegQIARAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Fscholarsarchive.byu.edu%2Fcgi%2Fviewcontent.cgi%3Ffilename%3D18%26article%3D1016%26context%3Dmi%26type%3Dadditional&usg=AOvVaw3mA7XWXsOyPghvThoT8qDf

Quote

Face veiling in public, occasional or ongoing, was expected of
women of higher social status in the ancient world. The first men-
tion of face veiling of women is recorded in an Assyrian text from
the thirteenth century Bc that restricted its use to noble women:
“Women, whether married or [widows] or [Assyrians] who go out
into a (public) street [must not have] their heads [uncovered]. Ladies
by birth .. . whether (it is) a veil(?) or robe or [mantle?], must be
veiled; [they must not have] their heads [uncovered].”? “Women of
the upper classes, whether married or not,” observe G. R. Driver
and John C. Miles, “must be veiled in public.”* Further, prostitutes
and common women were prohibited from assuming the veil,
the
sanction for which was a fearsome penalty: “A hierodule, ... whom
a husband has not married, must have her head uncovered in the
(public) street; she shall not be veiled. A harlot shall not be veiled;
her head must be uncovered. He who sees a veiled harlot shall ar-
rest(?) her; he shall produce (free) men (as) witnesses (and)... she
shall be beaten 50 stripes with rods, (and) pitch shall be poured on
her head.”* Free married women and widows as well as women
who were “captive maids” or “concubines”* (Assyrian esirtu)—who
were, in the view of Jeremias, in the “middle stage between free
woman and a slave woman”*—were obliged to be veiled.

 

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If are same as Assyrian our villager are common women , not royal family.

Quote

Modern Iranian women, especially the ones  opposing the Islamic revolution and the enforcement of the veil, are pointing fingers at the Arabs and  blaming them for introducing the veil and seclusion into the Persian society, even though historical evidence proves that it is the other way around.

In 539 BC, the Persians conquered Mesopotamia and it became part of the Persian state. The veil and the seclusion of women were among the social habits that the Persians adopted from the Assyrians and maintained over the years. In ancient Persia, women of noble families became also secluded and had to be covered when they went out in public.

And with the Persian conquests, the veil  spread to  neighboring Kingdoms and nations . It was introduced to the Levant region – currently known as Syria and Lebanon – and north of Arabia.

Arabs who were separated from these surrounding civilizations by sand dunes and vast uninhabited deserts were not introduced to the veil until the seventh century AD when they conquered the Persian lands.

https://alexandrakinias.wordpress.com/2010/06/27/history-of-the-veil-part-one-veil-in-the-ancient-world/

Quote

The first use of the veil dates back to the Assyrians, the rulers of Mesopotamia from about 1380 to 612 B.C.E. The Assyrian empire stretched from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean Sea and reached into Egypt. Assyrian legal writings preserved on engraved stone tablets detail the first laws concerning the concealment of women's faces. The basis of these laws is found in the very different legal status of Assyrian men and women. Assyrian men enjoyed a great deal of power, while women had none. Women were considered property and legally belonged to their fathers until marriage, when ownership passed to their husbands. Assyrian laws about veils enforced the different status of men and women and also defined the differences between types of women.

http://www.fashionencyclopedia.com/fashion_costume_culture/The-Ancient-World-Mesopotamia/Veils.html

Quote

There is much evidence, both textual and artifactual, for the veiling of women (and some men) in pre-Islamic Persia, Assyria, Arabia, and parts of Africa. The practice was hardly universal, however, and was most likely a contrivance of the elite classes. Ancient Persian kings and queens, for example, veiled themselves as a mark of separation and distinction from commoners. Imperial images on Sassanian coins depict a royal veil raised above the crown to show the monarch's face on the obverse. With the rise of Islam in the seventh century, proponents of veiling began to draw on the vocabulary and ideology of the new movement to imbue the practice of veiling with divine and prophetic significance.

https://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/veiling

Quote

The footwear of the Medes and Persians consisted either of pieces of leather or other material folded tightly round the feet and tied over the instep or of actual boots, which were just as primitively simple as the other type of foot-covering just mentioned. The Persian headdress was a fairly deep cap, coming down in front to the eyebrows and at the back to the nape of the neck. It was made of stiff material, such as felt or leather, and had side-flaps which were often long enough to be tied under the chin. The dress of Persian women differed little from that worn by the men. The primitive form of it was hides wrapped round the body. At a later time the cut was the same, but the garments were now made of fine leather or felt. The only real differences between the dress of the two sexes were that the women’s coats were wider and longer than those of the men and were closed down the front except for a slit at the breast. When the Median type of dress became increasingly common among the Persians the ancient Persian female garments gradually disappeared, or were greatly modified. They were considerably lengthened and became more voluminous, and the sleeves were wider. Median styles of dress were in strong contrast to the Persian styles. In the latter the garments were close-fitting, short, and made of strong material; in the former they were wide, long, and voluminous, and were therefore made of finer materials.

QmnQt7U.png

Edited by Lion.Kanzen
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25 minutes ago, Stan` said:

We take history seriously so we try to be thorough when we can. Thanks for the discussion though :)

 

34 minutes ago, shiraz said:

OK my friends! Give up! I don't want to fight! It was just a suggestion by a PhD. student of Shiraz University & a tour guide of the Persepolis for improving your game!

http://www2.shirazu.ac.ir/en/node/3530

perspolis4.jpg

:bye::heart:

 

Good but , more proof? You have properly artist reconstruction? 

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@shiraz

I think there is a misunderstanding between us. Let's start again, what is your issue about the current depiction of Persian women? It is only about the veil? What is your proposal? Veil for all the women?

Actually the game does not depict especially noble women. 

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1 hour ago, shiraz said:

OK my friends! Give up! I don't want to fight! It was just a suggestion by a PhD. student of Shiraz University & a tour guide of the Persepolis for improving your game!

No one is fighting you. They are having a debate with you. I'm in Academia as well, I obtained my doctorate a few months ago. Having debates is a standard practice among scholars. And it's also a standard practice on this site. 

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Get used to it dude. You are gonna have to go through the same thing when you finish your thesis.

Literally everyone in academia is skeptical of everything. Assume it's wrong until proven correct.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 6/20/2020 at 6:49 AM, shiraz said:

Hello

Please look at this picture which had been taken from the Persepolis:

xI3UPPRCePLLpLyD-v-kfUS4y_lxqNWQXkNvzYx-

See? There is a historical mistake in the game. The Persian women's clothing was this. Not the clothing that we can see in the game. I think their 3D models should be edited. Of course, it is just a suggestion to help improving the game:)!

:bye::heart:

A desperate effort of a fanatic Muslim that wants you to think veil was normal in Persia before Islam (veil was used in some cases in Persia, Greece and other countries as a symbol of high status but never was a norm and a must wear). Since hijab is very unpopular (yet still forced on women) in Iran, people like him do anything to pretend hijab is normal and a part of the Persian culture. Do your research! See the British museum for yourself to see how Persian women looked like before Arabs invaded them and forced their religion and customs in them by sword.

Edited by Evan
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2 hours ago, Evan said:

A desperate effort of a fanatic Muslim that wants you to think veil was normal in Persia before Islam (veil was used in some cases in Persia, Greece and other countries as a symbol of high status but never was a norm and a must wear). Since hijab is very unpopular (yet still forced on women) in Iran, people like him do anything to pretend hijab is normal and a part of the Persian culture. Do your research! See the British museum for yourself to see how Persian women looked like before Arabs invaded them and forced their religion and customs in them by sword.

Yes i search for the image and mostly of site is about that.

image.thumb.png.8e213d3fb9666598aaa290abcc9e6dc4.png

 

http://ijtihadnet.ir/حجاب-و-پوشش-بانوان-در-ایران-باستان/

https://shoaresal.ir/fa/news/220147/حجاب-زنان-ایرانی-در-ایران-باستان-و-شأن-ومنزلت-آن-ها

Quote

Basically, Iranians are moral people who believe in religious principles and principles. In examining the clothes and clothing of Iranians before Islam, one can find a collection of clothes in the book "History of clothing in Iran from the beginning to today". Tips are listed. The concept of cover is mostly used to cover the human body against heat and cold, as well as to protect against insect damage and, more importantly, to maintain chastity against the opposite sex, so humans have long been thinking about using cover.. The first coverings were made in 6,000 BC from branches, stems, leaves, roots and vegetation found in nature, until the discovery of natural fibers such as wool, fluff, and cotton fibers such as cotton and silk. Humans helped to use it to make cloth. Iran has also been one of the countries that have made significant progress in the textile and textile industry. For example, Will Durant mentions the two arts of Iranian weaving and tailoring as two prominent arts. At some point in history, we encounter the phenomenon of clothing. As a result, sewing and tailoring are produced according to color, taste and nature to cover the body. After that, we are faced with the concept of clothing, including gloves, hats, socks, shoes, jewelry, belts, bags, and so on. The type of clothing and apparel of people originates from factors such as geographical environment, season, gender, age, personality and the type of society in which we live. For example, the clothes of the Baloch people are usually sewn from cotton fabrics produced in that area or the foot of their fold from date fibers and leaves.. Is the issue of hijab and covering in our country related to the post-Islamic era? Basically, Iranians are moral people who believe in religious principles and principles. In the study of Iranian clothing and clothing before pre-Islam, a collection of clothes can be found in the book "History of clothing in Iran from the beginning to today". Has been. The written history of Iran dates back to 808 BC, ie the Median period, and from this period we can see Iranian clothing on stone carvings, then metal works and in later periods on plastering, pottery and ceramic works. During the Seljuk period, Mobin's paintings and eloquence are also reported in the characteristics of Iranian clothing, while Zandieh and Qajar periods also show examples of Iranian clothing.. For example, during the Parthian and Sassanid eras, women used a kind of chador, which, of course, differed from the concept of the chador in its modern form, but at the same time it meant the head covering. Rather, men wore a hat-like headband, which meant dignity and personality for men. Therefore, before and after the rise of Islam, Iranians did not have a problem with clothing. If you look at the clothes of the years that Iranians accept Islam until the time of Al-Buwayh and even the Seljuks, you will see that Iranian clothes are slightly different from Sassanid clothes, because Even before the advent of Islam, their clothing had a special cover and dignity. This trend is also observed in the Seljuk, Ilkhanid, Timurid and Safavid eras, and if there is a difference, these differences are slow, and these changes can be seen in a small way during the long historical period. It happens. How long does this period last? Almost until the last 50 years of the Qajar period, the tendency towards the West, which is seen in all social affairs and attracts Iranians to Western clothes, has been digested, but these changes are still digestible as in the past, but the issue of unifying the people's clothes during Reza Shah's reign And the discovery of the hijab, which was a sudden change in the law and order of non-Sharia, non-cultural and immoral, and combined with force and threat in a society with ancient cultural and religious beliefs.. When we review Reza Shah's remarks on the discovery of the hijab, we come across the phrase that "the hijab hinders the progress of Iranian society and women." Iranian veiled women took place on July 8, 1314, several months after intense preparations for the discovery of the hijab in society. , Faced many difficulties to attend the community. After this period, we no longer see a sequence and we see a kind of rupture in clothes and clothing. In the time of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, there is no compulsion in the unveiling of all people. In this period, the use of phrases such as freedom in choosing jobs, clothing and beliefs is common. But at the same time, in choosing these issues, people cannot ignore certain considerations, frameworks and rules such as ethics, sharia and culture.. A brief look at Iranian clothing throughout history shows that in no period have the people of Iran been dressed in comparison to the years 1343 to 1355, a dress that, while nudity, immaturity and anonymity, is an interruption in the logical course of Iranian clothing. He still can't answer why it's like a shock and a deep shock. In other words, during this period, other clothes did not fit the personality of the people and were accompanied by blind compulsion and obedience, so after the acceptance of Islam by the Iranians, they did not treat the hijab as a problem, even after that, such a concept was difficult for them. This problem was not even considered until the end of the Qajar period. Today, Muslims continue to wear headscarves among non-religious communities, such as Indians who wear "sari" or Chinese who wear "saran" or Indonesians who wear batik.. For Hindus, clothing has its own cultural identity. What is the need to be like the rest of the world in our clothing? Was there any compulsion to remove the hijab before Reza Khan? No, it wasn't like that; Even in the Qajar period, when some people had strictures on women's clothing, it was too religious for them, the use of long veils, etc., was not emphasized by religious jurists. Hijab must be manifested in human beings. It also appears in the form of clothing and apparel. During the reign of the Medes in ancient Iran and during the Elamite period, women held a high position. The statue of the goddesses of this period is in their hands, which confirms this statement. With the arrival of the Aryans in Iran, the value system in which the mother held a high position changed to a patriarchal system, and what has been debated in this period is the issue of women's hijab.. Women in ancient Iran observed their hijab, and basically the meaning of hijab in that period was different from today; In Persepolis motifs, compared to later periods, there was a trace of the hijab of Persian women. Iranian women in prehistoric times The criterion for dividing our prehistoric period is from the time of the invention of the line, which is estimated to be about five thousand years old. Before the arrival of the Aryans, the native tribes of Iran, who were known as Asians, lived for about ten thousand years BC. While humans still lived during the hunting season, they had a culture and civilization whose artifacts are scattered in museums around the world. Celestial has been noticed. In the first small painted pieces of baked flowers, which rarely show a human image, only the role of a woman or "mother of the Lord" is evident.. In the plateau of Iran, in the tenth and ninth millennia BC. Woman, whose main duty in nature, creation and life, worshiped the "fertility goddess" and the "goddess of the mother". Women in the primitive society of the Iranian plateau performed very heavy duties. It was natural that they were even superior to men, so much so that they became clergy. The women of ancient Iran, who were from the privileged class, always observed their hijab, according to the story of Weiss and Ramin mentioned during the Sassanid era, when Bahram Gour went to the plains, deserts and deserts to hunt outside the city with the girls. The songwriter and musician were confronted with appearing in front of the Shah without any hijab, and with their artistic performance, they stole his heart from him.. Some sources believe that Iranian women did not wear chadors and veils, and refrained from wearing headbands and showing off their limbs. And hair, tradition, and the privilege of the nobility were considered. Both Herodotus and Strabo consider the veiling of the women of the distinguished classes of ancient Iran to be a common thing, and consider it a kind of aristocracy, emphasizing that women of other classes wear the same veil. Free to know that it has come, it turns out that the word "clothing" and "clothing" in the Pahlavi language means(cvatur) was also used before the Sassanids, of course, if the tent was used, it would not be as it is today.. Basically, historical studies are confused with new concepts and ideas and a modern understanding of it; And each text must be studied in its own way. The transition from the stage of virtue to vice or the conversion of what is permissible to what is forbidden and what is permissible or vice versa is a case for covering a woman, which is very much the "hijab" that should always be considered. The meaning of "hijab" is used is not very correct. This suggests that the veil is a means of covering, and it may be inferred from the literal meaning of the word "covering" that not every covering is a veil. The use of the word "veil" on women's clothing, which means "large" covering, is a relatively new term in the past. The jurists have been used. The status of women in ancient Iran In ancient Iran, the woman held a high position and as a member of the family was equal to the man in all aspects of life. There is a lot of evidence to prove this. The religious practices that women should perform and the prayers they should offer are equal to that of men; Also, if the priest was not present, the woman might have reached the position of judge, and in history we see that older women such as Homay, Pourandokht and Azarmidakht have reached the position of king.. Material women's clothing As can be seen from the prominent Assyrian role of Nineveh, material women had long hair; And if there was a variety of hairstyles, from the point of view of the people of that time, the general board of material women was like this, the material women had no cover for their heads; There was not much variety in the pattern of the Dalber dress, and their usual set was two pieces, with a single piece on either side of the side of the foot so that the underwear was visible. The women, unlike the men, did not have shoes; Maybe After: Due to the type of work and their place of employment, they did not need to form a strong central government to deal with foreign enemies, especially the Assyrian government in the West, and to build the city of Hegmataneh as the capital and turn to wealth, in their appearance. There were also changes. Wealth had suddenly taken hold of them, which they did not have the opportunity to exploit. The people of the upper classes of society had become enslaved to fashion and luxury, and their men wore trousers and jewelry; They even wore embroidered "magenta" and adorned their wives with saddles and saddlery with gold. The women's clothing of that period was either due to the lack of contact with them due to the moral decency of the Iranians, which women did not have access to in public, or due to the similarity of their clothes with the clothes of Persian men.. The Achaemenid motifs are reminiscent of native landscapes with interesting covers, a simple, long shirt with sleeved and short sleeves, and from the knees down, the skirt in these motifs, a picture of a woman: wines up to the wrists. Hanging shows a native of Iran riding a horse from side to side and throwing a rectangular chador over his head and clothes; And underneath it is a shirt, a long skirt, and underneath, another shirt that is longer to the ankle. Persian women also wore the kind of clothes that Achaemenid men wore.. This is confirmed by the engraved image on a flower pot that is kept in the Hermitage Museum today. And the skirt was suitable if the height of men and women did not differ much, so the women's clothing of this period may not be different from the clothes of Persian men. It has been found that this carpet belongs to the Achaemenid period and shows the image of women wearing clothes such as Persian men's clothes and their shoes are the same as those worn by Persians. The only difference between men's and women's clothing is the ornate decoration and shape Sassanid women's clothing Women's clothing of the Sassanid period, as in previous periods, can only be sought from stone carvings or designs on dishes, because historians have not mentioned it; The type of Sassanid women's clothing can be obtained from the stone carvings of Anahita Elahe, beauty and wealth, and designs on the surviving plates that are available in museums in foreign countries, which show forms of various types of women's clothing of this period.. The Sassanid women wore long, very loose, loose-fitting shirts, which, like the Parthian women, were tied with a ribbon under their chests and tied. It has a Greek style and on it, the "crown" gives the officer a king. The star is covered with a star and its crown is similar to the crown of Ahuramazda. Underneath it are four strands of hair on his shoulders and chest. It is a Sassanid era. Sassanid women wore a veil that resembled today's tents, and this can be seen from the designs on the pottery left over from that period. The design of the plate depicting a prince in the Bazm House shows two women. Each one has a handkerchief on his mouth, tied to the back of his head, and trousers like men's trousers are worn on his feet, and he is wearing a robe that reaches to the middle of his leg, and Quba has three chakas in front of his skirt and three chakas in the back; And all around the skirt and the slits are fringed. Further explanation of the dress and hair style of Sassanid women There is an inscription from Shapur I in Bishapour that shows the king facing a queen who is holding a tulip or saghari flower with the right hand that the queen gives her and in Such is the case with the Sassanid king, but considering that: the eye is fixed on the queen and she is fully aware of it, in the Pahlavi language it means clothing and cover, and before the Sassanids.(cvatur) The word tent was also used, in the final conclusion that whether the tent was used in antiquity or not is confusing. In ancient times, Persian women had a high status. Because in the time of Zarathustra, the status of men and women was the same; And women could reach the position of judge, kingdom, etc. Among the hijab in ancient Iran is ancient history, military and political history; And it is not easy to research the type of women's clothing and hijab of this period, and the Shahnameh of the national and epic book of Iranians, although full of the epic and military history of the ancient Iranians, recounts the style of women's clothing of that period.. The statues left from that period show only the hijab of aristocratic women, which by applying the written works, the age of the inscriptions and the sharpness of the clouds, and by contemplating the written sources and the remnants of the ancient Iranian dynasties, in examining the way of covering It turns out that aristocratic women not only wore the hijab, but were a role model for women in the lower classes, and they also appeared in public and in public.. The Achaemenids After Cyrus conquered Hamadan, the capital of the Medes, the center of his kingdom, and the Persians benefited from the customs and even the dress of the Medes, it seems that women's clothing during the Achaemenid period did not differ much from that of the Medes. About women's clothing, it is written in this period: "From some of the designs left over from that time, we come across local women who have an interesting cover. Their shirts are simple and long or have a straight line and short sleeves. We also meet other women of that period who rode on horseback. They put a rectangular chador on all their clothes, and under it, a shirt with a long skirt, and under it, another long shirt up to the ankle.. Also discovered by a Russian delegation in the Pazyryk Valley is a rug depicting religious ceremonies celebrated by four women. They are of Iranian origin and wear Achaemenid clothing. The skin color of the characters is white, their eyes are brown and their hair is blue. In this rug, the resemblance between women's and men's clothing is very significant, a hypothesis previously confirmed by Herodotus.. The Greek historian Plutarch writes of the situation in Iran during the Achaemenid period: "Whenever it is necessary for Iranian women to leave their homes and travel, they sit in tents in tents and put the tents on a cart and carry them." Ahmad Kasravi concludes that the use of such a chador was for the wealthy, and that ordinary people wore it for a similarly smaller income, and that its appearance gradually changed to what it is today, but the name of the chador still remains.. Archaeologists are excavating fragments of a glazed brick found in an Iranian building in Babylon that shows a woman painted white. A brick piece of Susa depicts a white hand adorned with a bracelet carrying a spear. Of course, this cannot be a woman. It has even been said that the Iranians did not play any role. But we must, of course, value the documents obtained by accident. Apparently, women did not play a role in the framework of the great plans of the empire and the power of its rule. But among the small works of art, we come across countless maps that can be used to get a complete picture of the appearance of women in the great empire of Iran. The first thing that immediately catches the eye is women's clothing, which is the same Achaemenid pleated dress and the same hat that men wear..

منبع خبر : سایت خبری شعار سال

https://shoaresal.ir/fa/news/220147/حجاب-زنان-ایرانی-در-ایران-باستان-و-شأن-ومنزلت-آن-ها

Propaganda.

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