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Help for making a "manual"


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Yes, \LaTeX is great, I can highly recommend it. Here is a small example of 42 lines:

Spoiler

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[english]{babel}
\usepackage[a4paper,margin=25.4mm]{geometry}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{hyperref}
\usepackage{url}
\usepackage{verbatim}

\title{Lecture notes}
\author{av93}

\begin{document}
\maketitle
\tableofcontents
%\listoffigures
%\listoftables
%\clearpage
%\newpage
%\pagebreak

\section{Monday}
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit.

\section{Tuesday}
Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. 

\section{Wednesday}
\subsection{Morning}
Aenean massa.

\subsection{Afternoon}
\subsubsection{First lecture}
@#$% sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.

\subsubsection{Second lecture}
Donec quam felis, ultricies nec, pellentesque eu, pretium quis, sem.

\section{Thursday}
Nulla consequat massa quis enim.\footnote{Don't forget to quote your sources: \url{https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Lorem_ipsum_(unsourced)}}

\end{document}

Save it, then run “pdflatex file.tex” thrice, and the output should be:

av93.pdf

[EDIT]: Apparently some filter objects to the usual Latin word for “with”, hence those weird signs at the start of line 34; here is the “uncensored” file:

av93.tex

45 minutes ago, stanislas69 said:

That appears to be a commercial site trying to make money; keep in mind LaTeX itself is completely free and open source; better visit https://tug.org/

Edited by Nescio
@#$%
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8 hours ago, av93 said:

I'm trying to organize some of my university notes, and I want to create a manual like, and I need two features: hyperlinks inside the documents, and mousover text. What I can use? (easy program)

some wiki environment, like mediawiki or, more simple, dokuwiki. But you need a webserver (apache + php, and for mediawiki, also mysql): it could run locally, using Xampp or similar platforms.

Otherwise, a very simple software: Zim http://www.zim-wiki.org/

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6 hours ago, stanislas69 said:

@Nescio Yeah I just happened to like this websites because it saves me the trouble of setting up an environment :)

I highly recommend Overleaf (the link has my referer, but you can remove it, if needed), you can use it as full free, it has online viewer/editor, templates and you can work with it through git.

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On 11/11/2017 at 2:53 PM, stanislas69 said:

Have you heard of LaTeX ?

https://www.sharelatex.com

For 0 A.D. I believe it's ticket #1843 it was used to generate a manual.

actually latex is really powerful but i always wondered if it is really worth to use it.

What i mean is that this seems more like a scripting language than an "advanced" text editor thus it will require practice and to remember scripts and libraries that perhaps one can easly forget over time thus not so "time saving" even with practice.

But sure, if you want to invest more time for something of really fancy, LaTex is the way to go.

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lyx is what-you-see-is-what-you-mean GUI to create LaTeX without having to write or even read code. By configuring some hotkeys one can write equations more quickly than with a pen. With copy & paste solving linear equation systems becomes trivial. Since one can only add/remove pairs of parentheses and select the entire term, one also never runs into issues with them that can easily occur otherwise

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4 hours ago, Grugnas said:

actually latex is really powerful but i always wondered if it is really worth to use it.

What i mean is that this seems more like a scripting language than an "advanced" text editor thus it will require practice and to remember scripts and libraries that perhaps one can easly forget over time thus not so "time saving" even with practice.

But sure, if you want to invest more time for something of really fancy, LaTex is the way to go.

Yes, LaTeX is a typesetting language. You can use any general text editor (e.g. emacs, gedit, kwrite, notepad, etc) or a specialized TeX-editor (e.g. TeXworks, TeXnicCenter, LyX), but to compile it (create a proper pdf) requires a TeX-distribution to be installed (e.g. TeXLive, MiKTeX).

The learning curve is quite steep; you need to invest a few hours to get used to LaTeX, but once you've mastered it, life becomes so much easier.

When I started at university years ago, we were introduced to LaTeX on day one, and forced to use it for all assignments. I didn't like it initially back then, but now I'm really glad I had to. Since then I've never used MS Word, Powerpoint, or similar time consuming typesetting programs.

So if you want to be able to typeset professional documents with very little effort, learn LaTeX.

If you're not interested, perfectly fine. Many people aren't willing to invest time into learning it.

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