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What 0S Do You Run?


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many still shirk the XP because it changes many files and functions around, and programmers who deal with windows often get annoyed, and some people also experience problems with it.

Or you could be like me and turn on the Windows 98/2000 counterpart of everything in Windows XP, you'll feal more "at home"

My Desktop

(Yes, thats what my actual taskbar looks like when I'm busy doing stuff. I didn't click on 20 random things to make myself look l33ter ;)

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Well, Win98 ran quite nicely on my baby. I had serious, and yes I mean serious problems with Win95, though, although people refer to it as the most stable Win ever..

I guess I'm one of them. Never had a problem with Win95, fast and efficient, no frills, but 98 is buggy as all heck on my system (regular crashes, icons disappearing, dreadful memory management). Unfortunately I had to upgrade (yes, 98SE was an upgrade for me) to get our antiquated wireless network to work, as there is next to no network support in '95. Equally, no driver support in future versions of Windows, so I'm stuck until I get my own Internet connection.

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  • 9 months later...

ZeZar: I suggest you try out Knoppix, if you have a broadband Internet connection :) It's a completely-functional Linux distribution on a bootable CD that you can play around with as much as you want without having to install it on your hard drive.

Installing Linux on a computer that already has Windows on it (aka "dual-booting") can be tricky... you need to have a seperate drive or partition for the Linux install. The easiest method is to have another hard drive for Linux, but a seperate partition also works.

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I use SuSE linux - they offer a bootable CD as well.

In addition, their setup program will automatically re-partition your hard drive (that is, if your computer didn't come pre-installed with Windows XP) for you. The only problem, as mentioned above, is if your computer came pre-installed with Windows XP. Preinstalled ones come with a newer version of the NTFS filesystem - which's details have not been released yet. But you can still use the bootable CD :).

I personally wouldn't recommend Lindows. It's a unique idea, but IMHO won't work out well for you. They go by a monthly subscription basis, whereas I take Linux to be pay-once (to get your manual and tech support), then it's free for all time. Tech support is the best thing - you pay, you get it. Even the pro edition of SuSE's Linux (which includes development tools and all that - but if you have broadband you can download it for free from the Internet) only costs $80, and comes with tech support. On the other hand, Microsoft makes you pay $90 for each support 'incident'...

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I have Win XP Professional and Debian 3.0 on my PC, and Win XP Pro and Debian 3.0 with the newest KDE on my laptop - and I'm fully satisfied, since everything works fine with Linux (even WLAN, ACPI and the unusual display resolution) :) Required some days of handwork and kernel compiling, but it works just fine now :D

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I use Windows XP, although I've installed Cygwin to have access to all the Linux tools. It's great for anyone who's used a Unix-like OS at school. You can even download software made for Linux and build it from Cygwin using make, and it's likely to run.

I'm surprised few people voted Mac. I know several people with Mac laptops. Luckily, if 0AD works on Linux it will probably work on Mac too (Mac OS X is based on a Linux kernel).

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OS X is a Linux kernel!?! Yay, the open-source movement spreads!

And no, unless you can get a native environment for the Linux programs to run (i.e. Cygwin), they won't. Different libraries probably. And even if it were based on a Linux kernel, I have never heard of a Mac console, let along Bash (which I use a lot :) ).

MinGW would be a better choice than Cygwin for compiling, because the MinGW executables rely on Microsoft's MSVCRT.dll (included with Windows), while Cygwin-compiled executables rely on Cygwin1.dll (not included with Windows).

A Linux port of 0 A.D. would be a very, very good idea. Same with a Mac port. Seeing that there aren't many games for Linux/Macs, this could be the first and greatest! Although there are some great games for Linux (Pingus is great), many are not as commercial-scale as 0 A.D. The only problem is that Linux doesn't have the greatest 3D acceleration support, so those people with newer graphics cards will miss out a bit (currently, I have seen support for the ATi Radeon 9700 and nVidia makes drivers for Linux, so nVidia cards shouldn't have a problem).

And I would have a Linux on my new com, but it's got a pre-installed Windows and an undetailed filesystem (NTFS-2 or something, Microsoft obviously doesn't like to release filesystem details, even though Linux ext2 is way better...).

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