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Lion.Kanzen

Faction : Nomads Xiongnu

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For now 4 buildings are ready for test on atlas
 

  • House 3 variations + props # variations

    a
    Spoiler

    59a8f7ee56649_housea2.JPG.19e29b840c2d6aa5ba318cbfddde78bb.JPG59a8f7f03bf4f_housea.JPG.cea7d70298da19703b961eed5f7f305d.JPG


    b
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    59a8f7f242f54_houseb2.JPG.4f1f7d3b6161196b2c7028ff895a5524.JPG59a8f7f426935_houseb3.JPG.487d4d62a72f6fd72446f1c0111f7af4.JPG59a8f7f6147b4_houseb.JPG.14b1030d0b9763312be8ffce8e6dc5da.JPG


    c
    Spoiler

    59a8f7f805fef_housec2.JPG.485f3f4009f2953676c83fb91dec1062.JPG59a8f7fa89dca_housec3.JPG.31bbbcce679b836c0921eb2a2402751e.JPG59a8f7fc5ac83_housec.JPG.b3a8db4f5d1edaf77f548db8680448b7.JPG


     
  • Food depot (i din't called it farmstead because they were nomads i don't think they settledown a year for farming and then kill and move along), every prop has variations except the crates
     
    Spoiler

    59a8f7e73fcbc_fooddepot2.JPG.2807240cc446517a0f2ba55fd8408414.JPG59a8f7e949118_fooddepot3.JPG.bc31ab49e5d8515345e38fa1fef0f4e3.JPG59a8f7ec84069_fooddepot.JPG.8f2c158868b73ced419a0b4807b3a915.JPG

     

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On 28/8/2017 at 7:23 PM, Lion.Kanzen said:

I posted more in somewhere in eyecandy topic.

IMG_7953.JPG

Once the whole faction buildings are. finished i may test make something like the "Carthaginians" foundation with this pictures

 

 

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@Alexandermb

Nice work, can add another smithy building (for upgrades and stuffs)?

 

Also, as far as I am aware the Mongols/nomad in general kept their processed food (generally dried lamb meat) inside the yurt for winter, so there's need for a "food depot" building IMHO. Maybe just make the house building into resource drop off point?

zdiCks7.jpg

 

 

@Lion.Kanzen

Any reliable source on Scythian and Sarmatian arms & armors?

Edited by wolflance

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Just now, Lion.Kanzen said:

@Alexandermb You forget they were nomads only lives from meat and commerce they change Horse for other goodies.

i will change the stall of the food depot with pieces of meat like the ones used when male citicen carry meat. 

@wolflance 

the next in the list is the blacksmith

image.png.c2758d35f811362d365413c251a5eeee.png

PD: thanks for the picture, i will make props with it

small chair

image.png.39dbcbbd937bc843755bcbaf9db30b28.png

low table

image.png.15fa85de41c779fa0cf1b4490cb2325f.png

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For the most part, Xiongnu were lightly armed enough that "armored unit" really isn't a concern unless you want to include even the most obscure niche unit.

 

Xiongnu might had hired/captured Han craftsmen to work for them (and there were quite a number of Han surrendered to them), so maybe we can grab an asset or two from the Han buildings.

Edited by wolflance

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@Lion.Kanzen

Ayer me quede hasta las 6:00 am mientras aprovechaba las ideas de las decoraciones de las yurtas antes de que se me olvidaran y resultaron buenas. 

@wolflance also the resources depot is this:

when finished it will have prop points inside for tools, resources or any kind of use it can have

image.png.55d7bf3f3954d0ac79a1634900b15f72.png

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14 minutes ago, wolflance said:

Also, as far as I am aware the Mongols/nomad in general kept their processed food (generally dried lamb meat) inside the yurt for winter, so there's need for a "food depot" building IMHO. Maybe just make the house building into resource drop off point?

 

The "Food Depot" could just be called a "Resource Depot" and be a dropsite for all resources. Houses being dropsites too is an interesting idea. Though, you need a building for researching gathering techs.

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4 minutes ago, wowgetoffyourcellphone said:

The "Food Depot" could just be called a "Resource Depot" and be a dropsite for all resources. Houses being dropsites too is an interesting idea. Though, you need a building for researching gathering techs.

that could be a good idea too, maybe the houses and resource depot used for wood/food and the blacksmith & barrack/archery range for metal and stone ¿they should use stone?

as for buildings 4 are done, the blacksmith is nearly done

for future work the barracks should work for infantry/archers  but not for cavalry, it will need something like a corral with horses for cavalry a mix between corral/archery range
also they shouldn't build farm's but instead use the corral, so this faction will be more force to build corral and train herd's for hunting or maybe resource trickle with corrals if it works, or automatic spawn of the animals they hunted in the corral with some kind of cooldown.

Something like the game total war attila, they can't get food, they just get them invading. and this make the faction force the player to find a new kind of gameplay.

Edited by Alexandermb
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11 minutes ago, wowgetoffyourcellphone said:

The "Food Depot" could just be called a "Resource Depot" and be a dropsite for all resources. Houses being dropsites too is an interesting idea. Though, you need a building for researching gathering techs.

You as the leader(inside you)  as you are give us light.

 

@wolflance indeed they use style for Iranian Nomads , no need armor only fire quickly and Parthian tactics. With lancer shock cavalry.

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Speaking of carts...

The Mongols have a fairly unique "cart-train" design, presumably Xiongnu also had it?

5LA32gi.jpg

 

Ud5zWSp.jpg

 

I need to research more into this cart.

Edited by wolflance
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the one i lack of knowledge is about the temple/sanctuary, i don't know yet what kind of rituals or gods they had, so that one will be difficult.

 

Quote

You as the leader(inside you)  as you are give us light.

Praise de san. 

Edited by Alexandermb

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4 minutes ago, Lion.Kanzen said:

@wolflance indeed they use style for Iranian Nomads , no need armor only fire quickly and Parthian tactics. With lancer shock cavalry.

speaking of parthian tactics i was thinking on see what i can do with the new horse mesh as it is now "0 textures no skeleton" and make something with the actual horse textures and put it a skeleton for make this pose for a screenshot so it can work as tech icon

image.png.0df8577f01564d791895044d3ebc2344.png
 

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Quote

ue-chi (or Yüeh-chih): They originated on the northwestern borders of China. They were defeated by the Hsiung-nu around 206 BC. They suffered a second and decisive defeat at the hands of the Hsiung-nu in 175 BC. They fled to the west, splitting into the "Greater" and "Lesser" Yue-chi as they went:

Greater Yue-chi (or Greater Yüeh-chih): They suffered yet another defeat at the hands of Hsiung-nu in 162 BC and resumed their flight to the west. They found refuge east of the Aral Sea, driving the Sakas south into what is now Pakistan around 130 BC:

---------

Kushans (or Kusana): They became the ruling tribe of the Greater Yue-chi. They conquered the Surens in what is now Pakistan by about 135 AD. They absorbed the Lesser Yue-chi around the same time. They became a nomad dynasty ruling over a settled civilization that was notable for its prosperity and cultural sophistication. They facilitated the spread of Buddhism. They were subjugated by the Sassanid Persians around 225 AD. Briefly resurgent Kushan principalities were overrun by the White Huns in the late 400s AD.

 

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More info about them.

Tung-hu: They were established in what is now eastern Mongolia circa 300 BC. They were destroyed by the Hsiung-Nu around 206 BC.

Hsiung-nu

Hsiung-nu (or Xiongnu): They originated in the Ordos region of what is now north-central China. Their style of art, called "Ordos Art," emphasized stylized depictions of wild animals similar to Scythian art.

A chieftain named Motun (or Modu) arose to lead the Hsiung-nu to a position of great power and hegemony over the eastern steppes. He reigned from 209 to 174 BC. The story is told that Motun's father favored one of Motun's younger half-brothers to succeed him as chieftain of the tribe. Motun's father therefore attempted to arrange the death of Motun by devious means. Motun's father gave Motun to the Yue-chi as a hostage and then attacked the Yue-chi, hoping the Yue-chi would then kill Motun. Motun escaped this fate by stealing a fast Yue-chi horse and returning home. Motun's father was impressed by his prowess and gave him command of part of the Hsiung-nu army. Eventually, Motun executed his father, his stepmother, his half-brother, and several high-ranking officials to seize power. It seems probable that Motun was able to seize power from his father because his father had previously been badly defeated by the Chinese, losing the original Hsiung-nu homeland in the Ordos region in the process. Thus discredited in the eyes of his people, Motun's father was ripe for overthrow by the first strong candidate to come along and Motun was precisely such a candidate.

The first emperor of the Chinese Ch'in Dynasty consolidated three previous lesser walls into the one Great Wall of China specifically as an attempt to prevent the Hsiung-nu from reclaiming their lands which the Chinese had taken.

Under the leadership of Motun, the Hsiung-nu defeated first the Tung-hu to their east and then the Yue-chi to their west around 206 BC. During the period of internal disorder in China that followed the fall of the Ch'in Dynasty, the Hsiung-nu, under Motun's leadership, recaptured their homelands that had been lost to the Chinese by Motun's father. In 175 BC, Motun ordered his subordinate chieftain in charge of his western lands to make a second and decisive attack on the Yue-chi. This chieftain inflicted a devastating defeat on the Yue-chi, driving them off to the west. With this defeat, the Yue-Chi split into the "Greater" Yue-chi and "Lesser" Yue-chi. In 162 BC, Motun's son and successor, Lao-shang, inflicted still another severe defeat on the Greater Yue-chi, pushing them still farther west. Lao-shang made a drinking cup from the skull of the chieftain of the Greater Yue-chi. Next, the Hsiung-nu established themselves as tax-collecting nomadic overlords of the settled culture Silk Road oasis cities in what is now northwestern China. The rich farmlands around these cities became vital to the Hsiung-nu as a source of food while the artisans of these cities became vital to them as a source of iron weapons. They would contest control of these cities with the Chinese for years to come.

The Hsiung-nu fought against China off and on during the 2nd and 1st Centuries BC. They employed a complex policy mix of commerce, diplomacy, bluff, extortion, and all-out war in the form of border raids to extract a steady stream of wealth from China. Various permutations of this scenario played out through the 1st Century AD and into the early 2nd Century AD, with the Chinese gradually but steadily gaining the upper hand in the later decades of this period.

Once the Chinese regained their strength and aggressiveness under the leadership of the "Martial Emperor," Wu-ti (140-87 BC) of the Han Dynasty, they defeated the Hsiung-nu several times from 129 to 119 BC, taking the original Hsiung-nu lands in the Ordos region for the second and final time. Two minor Hsiung-nu tribes defected to the Chinese.

For administrative purposes, because of the enormous distances of the steppes, the Hsiung-nu divided their empire into mutually cooperating eastern and western halves. The leader of the western half was considered junior to the leader of the eastern half. The eastern half was called the "left" half and the western half was called the "right" half. This wording implies that the Hsiung-nu viewed their world from the perspective of looking south, such that east is to the left and west is to the right. For the Hsiung-nu to orient their world by looking south meant they oriented their world by looking at the Chinese. The Gök Turkswould employ the same east-half-west-half organizational structure in their own empire. This system worked well for the Hsiung-nu for a time. But several years of complex royal succession struggles and civil war resulted in their splitting into eastern and western tribal groupings in 44 BC. It is significant that the Chinese supported one side in this Hsiung-nu civil war. It was the leader of the eastern half of the Hsiung-nu Empire who asked for Chinese support in return for his future fealty to the Chinese. The Western and Eastern Hsiung-nu had radically different fates:

Western Hsiung-nu: After being defeated by the Chinese Han Dynasty in 36-35 BC, the Western Hsiung-nu migrated westward across Asia to Europe. This migration lasted for many generations. The Western Hsiung-nu theoretically became the "Black Huns". Centuries after their migration began, the Black Huns slammed into Europe with devastating consequences....

Eastern Hsiung-nu: They split into northern and southern tribal groupings in 48 AD:

Northern Hsiung-nu: They were destroyed by an alliance of the Chinese, the Southern Hsiung-nu, and the Mongol Hsien-pi tribe in 87-89 AD. The Hsien-pi did not behead the chieftain of the Northern Hsiung-nu. They peeled his skin off as a trophy.

Southern Hsiung-nu: They settled in northern China and served as mercenaries for the Chinese. Along with the Chinese and the Mongol Hsien-pi, they conquered the Northern Hsiung-nu in 87-89 AD. In the early 4th Century AD, the Chinese were badly weakened by civil war. A Hsiung-nu chieftain named Liu Yüan took advantage of the situation and proclaimed himself emperor of northern China in 308 AD. Led by Liu Yuan's son and successor, Liu Ts'ung, the Southern Hsiung-nu consolidated their hold on northern China through warfare, 311-318 AD. But the Southern Hsiung-nu could not stay unified. Throughout the 4th Century AD, northern China was ruled by a crazy quilt of petty Southern Hsiung-nu states that made constant war on each other. From 396 to 439 AD, they were conquered by the Turkic Toba tribe.

NOTE: Starting in 115 BC, and all the way into the early 2nd Century AD, there were intermittent, on-again off-again fights between the Chinese and various elements of the Hsiung-nu over control of the Iranian-populated Silk Road oasis cities in what is now northwestern China. The Chinese used a mix of warfare and diplomacy to wrest control of these cities from the Hsiung-nu during the late 2nd and 1st Centuries BC. Subsequently, the Hsiung-nu supported these cities in rebelling against the Chinese but then the Chinese put down the rebellions. The "civilized" Chinese were brutal in suppressing revolts of Silk Road cities, cutting off the heads of prisoners by the thousands.

 

Source.

http://www.horsenomads.info/section2.html#Hsiungnu

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27 minutes ago, Alexandermb said:

the one i lack of knowledge is about the temple/sanctuary, i don't know yet what kind of rituals or gods they had, so that one will be difficult.

They probably believed in some form of animism/shamanism...so I don't think there'd be a central place of worship.

Below picture depicts the Mongols, and is probably some artist's imagination with questionable accuracy...please take it with a HUGE GRAIN OF SALT.

lF2Mvyj.jpg

Edited by wolflance

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YKbYYbI.jpg

Xiongnu bronze helmet, although the time period isn't quite correct - this one predates Han Dynasty (roughly corresponding to China's Warring States period).

Edited by wolflance

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