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Found 9 results

  1. Empires Apart is an upcoming RTS that “wants to be Age of Empires at heart”, say Slitherine, who have just announced that they’ll be publishing DESTINYbit’s game when it’s ready for release in the second half of 2017. I hadn’t heard of the title until today, so I’ve been digging through old development video blogs like a digital archaeologist. You can see the three videos produced to date below, as well as an announcement trailer.
  2. Is an rts very familiar. Welcome @ray_ark don't be shy. We love rts and we aren't a company or corporation.
  3. I found this pdf in Spirit of Law channel. Looks interesting https://www.dropbox.com/s/jbzthjkx0l00wfk/superiority.pdf?dl=0
  4. This game is really cool, after recently beating both campaigns on hard I feel that I've finally mastered it. Back in the 1990s I was a child so I couldn't follow basic orders in this game. BattleZone is known as an RTS-FPS hybrid, in the game you can build a communication tower and then access a satellite, which allows you to command your units in RTS style. Usually you fly around shooting things with creative weapons! I personally liked BattleZone 2 a lot more but I haven't played it since 2002-2003. Watch some BZ2 below https://youtu.be/D5EglQGdXNc?t=21s It's a funny game because you can never play it like an actual RTS - enemy ships race into your base and the player must do much of the fighting himself, sometimes your ship is destroyed and you bail out. When on foot you have a jetpack (only in BZ2) so there is a survival element to BattleZone. It's good to retreat sometimes - getting stuck in enemy territory is high risk! BattleZone 2 impresses me the most because of the lighting effects and the different planets: Mire (a swamp planet with hostile raptor-like creatures), Bane (an ice planet with large animals that can attack vehicles, also there is ice that your tracked vehicles can fall through), then there's Rend (a planet full of volcanoes and lava, with minimal vegetation) and there is also The Dark Planet which has flashing blue crystals and an apparently synthetic surface, and finally there is a planet called Core which is an artificial planet that is home to the Scions (a race of people with spiritual/socialist views who are derived from humans). The characters and alien worlds were better in BZ2, BZ1 features only planets in our galaxy. You'll see in the video that while on foot, the player can snipe enemy pilots from their hovertanks, but you cannot snipe tracked vehicles. The rules on sniping turrets vary based on difficulty, and in BZ1 I think you can only snipe a turret when it's undeployed. Cool stuff! I wish they'd remake BattleZone 2 but that's a pipe dream. Rebellion Studios said they wouldn't do it.
  5. Seems like this is RTS games release week - 0 A.D, a new development version of Battle for Wesnoth, and now Widelands as well. We have just released Build 19 Widelands is a free, open source real-time buildup strategy game with single player campaigns and a multiplayer mode. The game was inspired by Settlers II™ (© Bluebyte) but has significantly more variety and depth to it. You are the regent of a small clan. Your task is to build an ever growing settlement. Every member of your clan will do his or her part to produce more resources to further this growth. Widelands offers a single-player mode with campaigns that tell stories of the tribes and their struggle in the Widelands universe. However, settling really starts when you unite with friends over the Internet or LAN to build up new empires together – or to crush each other in the dusts of war. Widelands also offers an artificial intelligence to challenge you. Homepage
  6. At game start or load a bot is thrown into cold water. He might discover a very hostile environment in terms of resources, units, buildings and enemies. Interestingly game start and end can be very similar, meaning eveything is low, if the human opponnent has victory within his grasp. But a bot doesn't give up, as long there is a small chance of success - he takes it, right? What is the worst case? Let's say no civic centers. That's close to ground zero in 0 A.D., because without CC you lack the territory to build any other structure. So, naturally the very first questions in this case are: Can I build a CC? And if not, what can I do at all? It turns out, these are very complex questions. Let's start with some simple conditions: has only resources -> whiteflag has only buildings -> whiteflag has only units -> whiteflag or fight like hellOk, that's not so difficult. And it looks translatable into straight forward JavaScript, too. Here comes the next level: has buildings, units, no resources has no CC has no CC builder can not train CC builder -> whiteflag or fight like hell can train CC builder -> gather resources -> train CC builder -> construct CC has CC builder -> gather resources -> construct CCActually that's only the surface. It assumes the units are not champions and the needed resources are available. Here are a few more: and finally: has units, resources, buildings has no CC has CC builder -> construct CC has no CC builder can train CC builder -> train builder -> construct CC can not train CC builder -> whiteflag or fight like hellCan you imagine how many conditions the bot has to check just to find out he has definetly lost? Now add more edge cases, mixin technologies, multiply with all buildings and all factions and you'll end up with tens of thousands lines of code, hard to read, difficult to maintain and taking months to write. That's where planners jump in. They know which conditions to check and how to answer them. Ontop they come up with a list of actions leading to your goal or none if your goal is unreachable. HTN (hierarchical task network) planners are conceptually fairly simple, but extremely powerful. They define a state, that's the starting point, a goal and operators and methods, the latter are just functions. Operators can change the state and methods result in more methods or operators. So, you initialize a planner with a state, your goal and then call the first method. From there it tries to decompose the problem until only an ordered list of operators is left - that's your plan. 0 A.D example: state = { resources: {food: 300, wood: 300}, entities: { structures.athen.civil.centre: 1 }, technologies: [phase.village]};goal = { resources: {}, entities: { structures.athen.field: 1}, technologies: [gather.wicker.baskets]}The goal basically says: I don't care about resources and the civic centre, but in any case I want a field and foragers better equipped. Do you see the two traps? Here's the plan: HTN: SUCCESS, actions: 8, 1 msecs op: 1, train_units ( units.athen.support.female.citizen, 1 ) op: 2, wait_secs ( 10 ) op: 3, build_structures ( structures.athen.farmstead, 1 ) op: 4, wait_secs ( 45 ) op: 5, build_structures ( structures.athen.field, 1 ) op: 6, wait_secs ( 100 ) op: 7, research_tech ( gather.wicker.baskets, 1 ) op: 8, wait_secs ( 40 )See how the planner automatically found out he needs a builder for the field and the farmstead for the technology. And the final state: resources: { food: 250, wood: 150, time: 195, metal: 0, stone: 0, pop: 1, popmax: 300, popcap: 20 }entities: { structures.athen.civil.centre: 1 units.athen.support.female.citizen: 1 structures.athen.farmstead: 1 structures.athen.field: 1}technologies: [phase.village, gather.wicker.baskets]... which can be used for your next goal. HTN Planners are well used in RTS games. The link finds a a few interesting presentations. Some games have highly optimized ones, checking hundreds of plans each tick, looking for the optimal strategy to keep the human opponent entertained. So far Hannibal's planner lacks a few features, he needs a better awareness of time e.g. calculate how long it takes to get a given amount of resources and more challenging learns the concept of parallel tasks. I'll continue when it produces heros. PS: Did I mention that's probably the first JS planner ever written for an RTS?
  7. This week I noticed there is a new RTS around: Banished. This is a city-building strategy game en looks pretty awesome. Unfortunately it's not free.
  8. I Have a curious idea: Make a "cold war style" stretegy game, based on: thw 0AD Engine and design, and i have some questions!: * Pyrogenesis supports explosions, shoots, flames and bursts? * How i can create the explosions? * Create and Launch missiles, how i can it? * "Massive destruction wepons", how i can create the effects of it, for example, radiation of nuclear weapons?, lose 7% health per explossion? * Build Airports, for garrison units on planes?
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