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Tomcelmare

Zapotec woman villager and other little stuff...

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Wouldn't it be nice  to change zapotec placeholders for females, here's an exemple:

https://www.dreamstime.com/editorial-photography-zapotec-female-dancers-oaxaca-mexico-girls-dancing-wearing-traditional-colored-costume-holding-pineapples-image71003597

 

Also, adding little figures and decorations should deepen the immersion feeling for any player:

 

- The famous bat deity Cocijo (god of rain):

http://art.thewalters.org/detail/78411/effigy-urn-of-cocijo/ 

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Zapotec_-_Effigy_Urn_of_Cocijo_-_Walters_482788_-_Three_Quarter.jpg

 

- The maize god Pitao Cozobi:

http://art.thewalters.org/detail/80448/figural-urn-3/

763-643.jpg.a301e3ce4c20faa8c283c43562e592df.jpg

 

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I understand. There's no need  to make a model with this kind of dress, but it's about using an outfit with several colours, maybe two or three. And the woman should have braids. Like this, she should be distinguishable among other women villagers ;)

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Just now, Tomcelmare said:

I understand. There's no need  to make a model with this kind of dress, but it's about using an outfit with several colours, maybe two or three. And the woman should have braids. Like this, she should be distinguishable among other women villagers ;)

The patterns, the color I need be sure... but most common is using humble dress, you know we don't know how they create this textil color. if is only a aristocracy thing.

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Just now, Tomcelmare said:

Yep, but there's no zapotec woman in these pictures...

 

Because the autor don't make it yet, but is mesoamerican fashion. and zapotecs still alive.

So we need to know how are zapotec from this timeframe.

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The archaeological evidence places them in this region for approximately 3,500 years, between the XV century and XIV a.C.

The pre-Hispanic Zapotec culture was very rich. They built staggered pyramids, funerary monuments and stadiums for the ball game.

In addition, they developed a complete writing system that evolved from hieroglyphics to a phonetic script. They were skillful craftsmen who worked gold and ceramics.

Nowadays, the Zapotec people are fully aware of this ancestral knowledge and care about preserving it.

And that can be seen in the changes that have experienced his dress and how the typical costume has been transformed into a way to strengthen his Zapotec identity and has even been established as a reference of all Mexico to the whole world.

The clothes of the Zapotecs: origins and characteristics

Although there is no precise historical data, the first evidences of the form of dress of the Zapotecs are found in its primitive sculpture.

In them, it can be seen that both sexes remained with the naked torso, the men wearing a kind of loincloth or mastate and the women with a skirt of rustic cloth that they themselves did, just to cover the pudenda parts, the hair loose, without Ornaments and barefoot.

In more recent pieces of pottery and in the codices, one can observe the incorporation of a rustic jacket, blouse or huipil as a result of Spanish influence, Christian morality during the Conquest of Mexico and to flee from the impertinent glances.

In Zapotec culture, women play an important role because it is based on their particular vision of matriarchy. From the beginning, the Zapotecs and their manner of dressing would generate admiration among those who observed them.

This is recorded by the French religious and traveler Charles Etienne Brasseur who would describe the Tehuana woman (who inhabited the Isthmus of Tehuantepec) in the middle of the nineteenth century:

That night she wore a skirt of striped cloth, water-green... a red silk gauze huipil incarnate, embroidered with gold... Her hair, separated on the forehead and braided with long blue stripes, formed two splendid braids... I repeat it , I have never seen a more impressive image of Isis or Cleopatra.

Centuries later, these changes in the clothing of the Zapotecs and their fame would be accentuated by the creation of railroad tracks, which meant greater contact with fabrics and foreign merchandise.

In this way, influenced from the Philippines by the embroideries of the Manila shawl, the floral motifs of the Andalusian silk embroideries and the holans of Holland, the most well-known attire of the Zapotec culture: the tehuana costume.

The tehuana suit

This suit is worn by the Zapotec women of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. Essentially it is composed of huipil, petticoat, holán and several accessories that vary according to the occasion.

The huipil and the petticoat are made in velvet, satin, angel skin or peach skin and are usually richly embroidered with floral motifs and be very colorful.

The wedding dresses are made in white and the mourning in dark colors. The gala dress is used in traditional parties such as candles or the Guelaguetza. The most remarkable thing is that there are no two identical suits.

The main characteristic of Zapotec clothing is that it does not differentiate the social classes since, beyond the occasion and the quality of the materials, all the women carry the same garments.

Of all the traditional Mexican garments, the tehuana suit is the most entrenched in the foreign imagination.

Perhaps it is due to the exhibition in the art and the cinema of the twentieth century. From the clothes of Maria Felix in the movie Tizoc with Pedro Infante, to the works of Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo and Tina Modotti.

The huipil

The huipil is a short sleeved blouse, made of a rectangular fabric, formed by several joined parts that is folded in half and with a head opening, and then notched to the body at the sides.

They are made in a wide variety of colors and designs woven and embroidered by hand or mechanically.

The petticoat

The petticoat is a skirt that must be combined with the motifs and colors of the huipil. In addition it has a lace and is combined with a reed, called holán, of a hard and starchy fabric that serves as background or owner. This combination of petticoat and holán is called rabona.

Shoes and Accessories

Traditionally, Zapotec women were barefoot. But then they used sandals called huaraches and, currently, low-heeled shoes.

A fundamental aspect in the tehuana suit is the headdress, since it does not have only an aesthetic intention.

What was the Zapotec Dress like?  1 Huarache Zapotec. Image via Young craftsmen

Although it should be combined with the motifs of the rest of the clothing, its main function is to indicate the woman's emotional situation: if used on the left side means that she is single and without commitment. If it is a married or engaged woman, the headdress will be worn on the right side.

Another garment of flashy is the glow or bidaniro, that is used in special occasions or to go to mass.

It consists of an opening where it fits the face, surrounding it with a large lace cut. This piece would be representative because it was in the ticket of 10 Mexican pesos after winning a contest of typical Mexican costumes.

Other accessories, such as gold jewelry, can be part, as the occasion allows: bracelet, slave, torzales, pectorales and chokers.

The men's attire

In the case of men the typical clothing was blanket clothing with hats and huaraches. Nowadays black dress pants are worn, guayaberas or white philippines, huaraches, handkerchief and hat.

References

  1. "Tehuana regional costume: The dress that envelops the Mexican woman, in fabrics of beauty, tenderness and tradition." Retrieved on June 2, 2017 at hojaescrita.wordpress.com.
  2. "Zapotecos". Retrieved on June 2, 2017 in basica.primariatic.sep.gob.mx.
  3. Becerra de la Cruz, Gilda (2013). "Tehuana costume: Its transformation and representation in art. The conformation of a social image between myth and reality". Retrieved on June 2, 2017 at comitemelendre.blogspot.com.
  4. Campbell, Howard and Susanne Green (1999). "History of the representations of the Zapotec woman of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. In: Studies on Contemporary Cultures. Vol. V. No. 9, Colima, June 1999, pp. 89-112.
  5. Ramos, Oscar (2016). "The Tehuana woman's headdress". Retrieved on June 2, 2017 in revista.escaner.cl

 

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Even this is zapotec, lol. this is the 2017 evolve of those traditions.

But...

Quote

Of all the traditional Mexican garments, the tehuana suit is the most entrenched in the foreign imagination.

Perhaps it is due to the exhibition in the art and the cinema of the twentieth century. From the clothes of Maria Felix in the movie Tizoc with Pedro Infante, to the works of Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo and Tina Modotti

Spoiler

2017-Frauen-Tigerlily-Zapotec-Mu-Mu-Charcoal-EU-Deutschland-Q1000011578.jpg

b3222b6f92bd99db6f3bde53cb79796a.jpg

 

 

2017-Frauen-Tigerlily-Zapotec-Mu-Mu-Charcoal-EU-Deutschland-Q1000011578.jpg

Edited by Lion.Kanzen

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On 2/10/2018 at 2:33 PM, Lion.Kanzen said:

The problem with traditional dresses is many have Spanish influence.

Its called "traje tipico" or traditional outfit.

7a8682865726c7d12ba8b1ab33ae490e.jpg

Pero mira como estan esas norteñas papa

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