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I believe Salvador Dali's representation of the Colossus of Rhodes is as close as I've ever seen:

0689.thumb.jpg.ed2cc3c4ddbbc6c10a0edb849f9f486e.jpg

 

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Colossus_of_Rhodes#/Posture

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A relief in a nearby temple shows Helios standing with one hand shielding his eyes, similar to the way a person shields their eyes when looking toward the sun, and it is quite possible that the colossus was constructed in the same pose. While scholars do not know what the statue looked like, they do have a good idea of what the head and face looked like, as it was of a standard rendering at the time. The head would have had curly hair with evenly spaced spikes of bronze or silver flame radiating, similar to the images found on contemporary Rhodian coins.

 

Edited by wowgetoffyourcellphone
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It could easily be a scenario or campaign or something in EA. Or the destruction of the colossus leaves a permanent rubble that can be mined for metal. Rhodians and Pergamenes definitely probable

Looks very interesting.

As to how the Colossus would have looked, any interpretation is speculative, of course. What can be safely deduced: The statue was made of bronze, hollow with rocks inside, and 70 cubits tall, i

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1 hour ago, wowgetoffyourcellphone said:

Right here is how it should look, IMHO, except for an octagonal pedestal. (no leaf-covered penis either)

EL+DIOS+HELIOS.+BLOG+IMPERIO+ROMANO+DE+X

We should cover his parts?

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Let's have a look at what the ancients wrote about it, starting with Pliny Naturalis Historia 34.18:

Spoiler

[...]
ante omnes autem in admiratione fuit solis colossus rhodi, quem fecerat chares lindius, lysippi supra dicti discipulus. lxx cubitorum altitudinis fuit hoc simulacrum, post lxvi annum terrae motu prostratum, sed iacens quoque miraculo est. pauci pollicem eius amplectuntur, maiores sunt digiti quam pleraeque statuae. vasti specus hiant defractis membris; spectantur intus magnae molis saxa, quorum pondere stabiliverat eum constituens. duodecim annis tradunt effectum ccc talentis, quae contigerant ex apparatu regis demetrii relicto morae taedio obsessa rhodo. sunt alii centum numero in eadem urbe colossi minores hoc, sed ubicumque singuli fuissent, nobilitaturi locum, praeterque hos deorum quinque, quos fecit Bryaxis.
[...]

[...]
But that which is by far the most worthy of our admiration, is the colossal statue of the Sun, which stood formerly at Rhodes, and was the work of Chares the Lindian, a pupil of the above-named Lysippus; no less than seventy cubits in height. This statue fifty-six years after it was erected, was thrown down by an earthquake; but even as it lies, it excites our wonder and admiration. Few men can clasp the thumb in their arms, and its fingers are larger than most statues. Where the limbs are broken asunder, vast caverns are seen yawning in the interior. Within it, too, are to be seen large masses of rock, by the weight of which the artist steadied it while erecting it. It is said that it was twelve years before this statue was completed, and that three hundred talents were expended upon it; a sum raised from the engines of warfare which had been abandoned by King Demetrius, when tired of the long-protracted siege of Rhodes. In the same city there are other colossal statues, one hundred in number; but though smaller than the one already mentioned, wherever erected, they would, any one of them, have ennobled the place. In addition to these, there are five colossal statues of the gods, which were made by Bryaxis.
[...]

Then there is Strabo 14.2.5 on Rhodes:

Spoiler

ἡ δὲ τῶν Ῥοδίων πόλις κεῖται μὲν ἐπὶ τοῦ ἑωθινοῦ ἀκρωτηρίου, λιμέσι δὲ καὶ ὁδοῖς καὶ τείχεσι καὶ τῇ ἄλλῃ κατασκευῇ τοσοῦτον διαφέρει τῶν ἄλλων ὥστ᾽ οὐκ ἔχομεν εἰπεῖν ἑτέραν ἀλλ᾽ οὐδὲ πάρισον, μή τί γε κρείττω ταύτης τῆς πόλεως. θαυμαστὴ δὲ καὶ ἡ εὐνομία καὶ ἡ ἐπιμέλεια πρός τε τὴν ἄλλην πολιτείαν καὶ τὴν περὶ τὰ ναυτικά, ἀφ᾽ ἧς ἐθαλαττοκράτησε πολὺν χρόνον καὶ τὰ λῃστήρια καθεῖλε καὶ Ῥωμαίοις ἐγένετο φίλη καὶ τῶν βασιλέων τοῖς φιλορωμαίοις τε καὶ φιλέλλησιν· ἀφ᾽ ὧν αὐτόνομός τε διετέλεσε καὶ πολλοῖς ἀναθήμασιν ἐκοσμήθη, ἃ κεῖται τὰ μὲν πλεῖστα ἐν τῷ Διονυσίῳ καὶ τῷ γυμνασίῳ, ἄλλα δ᾽ ἐν ἄλλοις τόποις. ἄριστα δὲ ὅ τε τοῦ Ἡλίου κολοσσός, ὅν φησιν ὁ ποιήσας τὸ ἰαμβεῖον ὅτι «ἑπτάκις δέκα Χάρης ἐποίει πηχέων ὁ Λίνδιος.» κεῖται δὲ νῦν ὑπὸ σεισμοῦ πεσὼν περικλασθεὶς ἀπὸ τῶν γονάτων· οὐκ ἀνέστησαν δ᾽ αὐτὸν κατά τι λόγιον. τοῦτό τε δὴ τῶν ἀναθημάτων κράτιστον (τῶν γοῦν ἑπτὰ θεαμάτων ὁμολογεῖται) καὶ αἱ τοῦ Πρωτογένους γραφαί, ὅ τε Ἰάλυσος καὶ ὁ Σάτυρος παρεστὼς στύλῳ, ἐπὶ δὲ τῷ στύλῳ πέρδιξ ἐφειστήκει, πρὸς ὃν οὕτως ἐκεχήνεσαν ὡς ἔοικεν οἱ ἄνθρωποι νεωστὶ ἀνακειμένου τοῦ πίνακος, ὥστ᾽ ἐκεῖνον ἐθαύμαζον, ὁ δὲ Σάτυρος παρεωρᾶτο καίτοι σφόδρα κατωρθωμένος· ἐξέπληττον δ᾽ ἔτι μᾶλλον οἱ περδικοτρόφοι κομίζοντες τοὺς τιθασοὺς καὶ τιθέντες καταντικρύ· ἐφθέγγοντο γὰρ πρὸς τὴν γραφὴν οἱ πέρδικες καὶ ὠχλαγώγουν. ὁρῶν δὲ ὁ Πρωτογένης τὸ ἔργον πάρεργον γεγονὸς ἐδεήθη τῶν τοῦ τεμένους προεστώτων ἐπιτρέψαι παρελθόντα ἐξαλεῖψαι τὸν ὄρνιν καὶ ἐποίησε. δημοκηδεῖς δ᾽ εἰσὶν οἱ Ῥόδιοι καίπερ οὐ δημοκρατούμενοι, συνέχειν δ᾽ ὅμως βουλόμενοι τὸ τῶν πενήτων πλῆθος. σιταρχεῖται δὴ ὁ δῆμος καὶ οἱ εὔποροι τοὺς ἐνδεεῖς ὑπολαμβάνουσιν ἔθει τινὶ πατρίῳ, λειτουργίαι τέ τινές εἰσιν ὀψωνιζόμεναι, ὥσθ᾽ ἅμα τόν τε πένητα ἔχειν τὴν διατροφὴν καὶ τὴν πόλιν τῶν χρειῶν μὴ καθυστερεῖν καὶ μάλιστα πρὸς τὰς ναυστολίας. τῶν δὲ ναυστάθμων τινὰ καὶ κρυπτὰ ἦν καὶ ἀπόρρητα τοῖς πολλοῖς, τῷ δὲ κατοπτεύσαντι ἢ παρελθόντι εἴσω θάνατος ὥριστο ἡ ζημία. κἀνταῦθα δὲ ὥσπερ ἐν Μασσαλίᾳ καὶ Κυζίκῳ τὰ περὶ τοὺς ἀρχιτέκτονας καὶ τὰς ὀργανοποιίας καὶ θησαυροὺς ὅπλων τε καὶ τῶν ἄλλων ἐσπούδασται διαφερόντως, καὶ ἔτι γε τῶν παρ᾽ ἄλλοις μᾶλλον.

The city of the Rhodians lies on the eastern promontory of Rhodes; and it is so far superior to all others in harbors and roads and walls and improvements in general that I am unable to speak of any other city as equal to it, or even as almost equal to it, much less superior to it. It is remarkable also for its good order, and for its careful attention to the administration of affairs of state in general; and in particular to that of naval affairs, whereby it held the mastery of the sea for a long time and overthrew the business of piracy, and became a friend to the Romans and to all kings who favoured both the Romans and the Greeks. Consequently it not only has remained autonomous. but also has been adorned with many votive offerings, which for the most part are to be found in the Dionysium and the gymnasium, but partly in other places. The best of these are, first, the Colossus of Helius, of which the author of the iambic verse says, “seven times ten cubits in height, the work of Chares the Lindian;” but it now lies on the ground, having been thrown down by an earthquake and broken at the knees. In accordance with a certain oracle, the people did not raise it again. This, then, is the most excellent of the votive offerings (at any rate, it is by common agreement one of the Seven Wonders); and there are also the paintings of Protogenes, his Ialysus and also his Satyr, the latter standing by a pillar, on top of which stood a male partridge. And at this partridge, as would be natural, the people were so agape when the picture had only recently been set up, that they would behold him with wonder but overlook the Satyr, although the latter was a very great success. But the partridge-breeders were still more amazed, bringing their tame partridges and placing them opposite the painted partridge; for their partridges would make their call to the painting and attract a mob of people. But when Protogenes saw that the main part of the work had become subordinate, he begged those who were in charge of the sacred precinct to permit him to go there and efface the partridge, and so he did. The Rhodians are concerned for the people in general, although their rule is not democratic; still, they wish to take care of their multitude of poor people. Accordingly, the people are supplied with provisions and the needy are supported by the well-to-do, by a certain ancestral custom; and there are certain liturgies that supply provisions, so that at the same time the poor man receives his sustenance and the city does not run short of useful men, and in particular for the manning of the fleets. As for the roadsteads, some of them were kept hidden and forbidden to the people in general; and death was the penalty for any person who spied on them or passed inside them. And here too, as in Massalia and Cyzicus, everything relating to the architects, the manufacture of instruments of war, and the stores of arms and everything else are objects of exceptional care, and even more so than anywhere else.

And Polybius 5.88–90 on the international response to the earthquake:

Spoiler

[5.88.1] Ῥόδιοι δὲ κατὰ τοὺς προειρημένους καιροὺς ἐπειλημμένοι τῆς ἀφορμῆς τῆς κατὰ τὸν σεισμὸν τὸν γενόμενον παρ᾽ αὐτοῖς βραχεῖ χρόνῳ πρότερον, ἐν ᾧ συνέβη τόν τε κολοσσὸν τὸν μέγαν πεσεῖν καὶ τὰ πλεῖστα τῶν τειχῶν καὶ τῶν νεωρίων, [2] οὕτως ἐχείριζον νουνεχῶς καὶ πραγματικῶς τὸ γεγονὸς ὡς μὴ βλάβης, διορθώσεως δὲ μᾶλλον, αὐτοῖς αἴτιον γενέσθαι τὸ σύμπτωμα. [3] τοσοῦτον ἄγνοια καὶ ῥᾳθυμία διαφέρει παρ᾽ ἀνθρώποις ἐπιμελείας καὶ φρονήσεως περί τε τοὺς κατ᾽ ἰδίαν βίους καὶ τὰς κοινὰς πολιτείας, ὥστε τοῖς μὲν καὶ τὰς ἐπιτυχίας βλάβην ἐπιφέρειν, τοῖς δὲ καὶ τὰς περιπετείας ἐπανορθώσεως γίνεσθαι παραιτίας. [4] οἱ γοῦν Ῥόδιοι τότε παρὰ τὸν χειρισμὸν τὸ μὲν σύμπτωμα ποιοῦντες μέγα καὶ δεινόν, αὐτοὶ δὲ σεμνῶς καὶ προστατικῶς κατὰ τὰς πρεσβείας χρώμενοι ταῖς ἐντεύξεσι καὶ ταῖς κατὰ μέρος ὁμιλίαις, εἰς τοῦτ᾽ ἤγαγον τὰς πόλεις, καὶ μάλιστα τοὺς βασιλεῖς, ὥστε μὴ μόνον λαμβάνειν δωρεὰς ὑπερβαλλούσας, ἀλλὰ καὶ χάριν προσοφείλειν αὐτοῖς τοὺς διδόντας. [5] Ἱέρων γὰρ καὶ Γέλων οὐ μόνον ἔδωκαν ἑβδομήκοντα καὶ πέντ᾽ ἀργυρίου τάλαντα πρὸς τὴν εἰς τὸ ἔλαιον τοῖς ἐν τῷ γυμνασίῳ χορηγίαν, τὰ μὲν παραχρῆμα, τὰ δ᾽ ἐν χρόνῳ βραχεῖ παντελῶς, ἀλλὰ καὶ λέβητας ἀργυροῦς καὶ βάσεις τούτων καί τινας ὑδρίας ἀνέθεσαν, [6] πρὸς δὲ τούτοις εἰς τὰς θυσίας δέκα τάλαντα καὶ τὴν ἐπαύξησιν τῶν πολιτῶν ἄλλα δέκα, χάριν τοῦ τὴν πᾶσαν εἰς ἑκατὸν τάλαντα γενέσθαι δωρεάν. [7] καὶ μὴν ἀτέλειαν τοῖς πρὸς αὐτοὺς πλοϊζομένοις ἔδοσαν καὶ πεντήκοντα καταπέλτας τριπήχεις. [8] καὶ τελευταῖον τοσαῦτα δόντες, ὡς προσοφείλοντες χάριν, ἔστησαν ἀνδριάντας ἐν τῷ τῶν Ῥοδίων δείγματι, στεφανούμενον τὸν δῆμον τῶν Ῥοδίων ὑπὸ τοῦ δήμου τοῦ Συρακοσίων.

About the same period the earthquake occurred at Rhodes, which overthrew the great Colossus and the larger part of the walls and dockyards. But the adroit policy of the Rhodians converted this misfortune into an opportunity; and under their skilful management, instead of adding to their embarrassments, it became the means of restoring their prosperity. So decisive in human affairs, public or private, is the difference between incapacity and good sense, between idle indifference and a close attention to business. Good fortune only damages the one, while disaster is but a means of recovery to the other. This was illustrated by the manner in which the Rhodians turned the misfortune that befell them to account. They enhanced its magnitude and importance by the prominence which they gave it, and the serious tone in which they spoke of it, as well by the mouth of their ambassadors as in the intercourse of private life; and they created thus such an effect upon other states, and especially upon the feelings of the kings, that they were not only overwhelmed with presents, but made the donors feel actually obliged for their acceptance of them.
Hiero and Gelo, for instance, presented them with seventy-five talents of silver, part at once, and the rest at a very short interval, as a contribution towards the expenses of the gymnasium; gave them for religious purposes some silver cauldrons and their stands, and some water vessels; and in addition to this ten talents for their sacrifices, and ten more to attract new citizens: their intention being that the whole present should amount to a hundred talents. Not only so, but they gave immunity from customs to Rhodian merchants coming to their ports; and presented them besides with fifty catapults of three cubits length. In spite too of these large gifts, they regarded themselves as under an obligation to the Rhodians; and accordingly erected statues in the Deigma or Mart of Rhodes, representing the community of Rhodes crowned by that of Syracuse.

[5.89.1] ἐπηγγείλατο δὲ καὶ Πτολεμαῖος αὐτοῖς ἀργυρίου τάλαντα τριακόσια καὶ σίτου μυριάδας ἀρταβῶν ἑκατόν, ξύλα δὲ ναυπηγήσιμα δέκα πεντήρων καὶ δέκα τριήρων, πευκίνων τετραγώνων πήχεις ἐμμέτρους τετρακισμυρίους, [2] καὶ χαλκοῦ νομίσματος τάλαντα χίλια, στυππίου τρισχίλι᾽, ὀθονίων ἱστοὺς τρισχιλίους, [3] εἰς τὴν τοῦ κολοσσοῦ κατασκευὴν τάλαντα τρισχίλι᾽, οἰκοδόμους ἑκατόν, ὑπουργοὺς τριακοσίους καὶ πεντήκοντα, καὶ τούτοις καθ᾽ ἕκαστον ἔτος εἰς ὀψώνιον τάλαντα δεκατέτταρα, [4] πρὸς δὲ τούτοις εἰς τοὺς ἀγῶνας καὶ τὰς θυσίας ἀρτάβας σίτου μυρίας δισχιλίας, καὶ μὴν εἰς σιτομετρίαν δέκα τριήρων ἀρτάβας δισμυρίας. [5] καὶ τούτων ἔδωκε τὰ μὲν πλεῖστα παραχρῆμα, τοῦ δ᾽ ἀργυρίου παντὸς τὸ τρίτον μέρος. [6] παραπλησίως Ἀντίγονος ξύλ᾽ ἀφ᾽ ἑκκαιδεκαπήχους ἕως ὀκταπήχους εἰς σφηκίσκων λόγον μύρια, στρωτῆρας ἑπταπήχεις πεντακισχιλίους, σιδήρου τάλαντα τρισχίλια, πίττης τάλαντα χίλι᾽, ἄλλης ὠμῆς μετρητὰς χιλίους, ἀργυρίου πρὸς τούτοις ἑκατὸν ἐπηγγείλατο τάλαντα, [7] Χρυσηὶς δ᾽ ἡ γυνὴ δέκα μὲν σίτου μυριάδας, τρισχίλια δὲ μολίβδου τάλαντα. [8] Σέλευκος δ᾽ ὁ πατὴρ Ἀντιόχου χωρὶς μὲν ἀτέλειαν τοῖς εἰς τὴν αὑτοῦ βασιλείαν πλοϊζομένοις, χωρὶς δὲ πεντήρεις μὲν δέκα κατηρτισμένας, σίτου δ᾽ εἴκοσι μυριάδας, [9] καὶ μὴν ξύλων καὶ ῥητίνης καὶ τριχὸς μυριάδας πηχῶν καὶ ταλάντων χιλιάδας.

Then too Ptolemy offered them three hundred talents of silver; a million medimni of corn; ship timber for ten quinqueremes and ten triremes, consisting of forty thousand cubits of squared pine planking; a thousand talents of bronze coinage; three thousand talents of tow; three thousand pieces of sail cloth; three thousand talents for the repair of the Colossus; a hundred master builders with three hundred and fifty workmen, and fourteen talents yearly to pay their wages. Besides this he gave twelve thousand medimni of corn for their public games and sacrifices, and twenty thousand medimni for victualling ten triremes. The greater part of these goods was delivered at once, as well as a third of the whole of the money named.
In a similar spirit Antigonus offered ten thousand timbers, varying from sixteen to eight cubits in length, to be used as purlins; five thousand rafters seven cubits long; three thousand talents of iron; a thousand talents of pitch; a thousand amphorae of the same unboiled; and a hundred talents of silver besides. His queen, Chryseis, also gave a hundred thousand medimni of corn, and three thousand talents of lead. Again Seleucus, father of Antiochus, besides granting freedom from imports to Rhodians sailing to his dominions, and besides giving ten quinqueremes fully equipped, and two hundred thousand medimni of corn; gave also ten thousand cubits of timber, and a thousand talents of resin and hair.

[5.90.1] παραπλήσια δὲ τούτοις Προυσίας καὶ Μιθριδάτης, ἔτι δ᾽ οἱ κατὰ τὴν Ἀσίαν ὄντες δυνάσται τότε, λέγω δὲ Λυσανίαν, Ὀλύμπιχον, Λιμναῖον. [2] τάς γε μὴν πόλεις τὰς συνεπιλαμβανομένας αὐτοῖς κατὰ δύναμιν οὐδ᾽ ἂν ἐξαριθμήσαιτο ῥᾳδίως οὐδείς· [3] ὥσθ᾽ ὅταν μέν τις εἰς τὸν χρόνον ἐμβλέψῃ καὶ τὴν ἀρχήν, ἀφ᾽ οὗ συμβαίνει τὴν πόλιν αὐτῶν συνῳκίσθαι, καὶ λίαν θαυμάζειν ὡς βραχεῖ χρόνῳ μεγάλην ἐπίδοσιν εἴληφε περί τε τοὺς κατ᾽ ἰδίαν βίους καὶ τὰ κοινὰ τῆς πόλεως· [4] ὅταν δ᾽ εἰς τὴν εὐκαιρίαν τοῦ τόπου καὶ τὴν ἔξωθεν ἐπιφορὰν καὶ συμπλήρωσιν τῆς εὐδαιμονίας, μηκέτι θαυμάζειν, μικροῦ δ᾽ ἐλλείπειν δοκεῖν τοῦ καθήκοντος. [5] ταῦτα μὲν οὖν εἰρήσθω μοι χάριν πρῶτον μὲν τῆς Ῥοδίων περὶ τὰ κοινὰ προστασίας — ἐπαίνου γάρ εἰσιν ἄξιοι καὶ ζήλου — δεύτερον δὲ τῆς τῶν νῦν βασιλέων μικροδοσίας καὶ τῆς τῶν ἐθνῶν καὶ πόλεων μικροληψίας, [6] ἵνα μηθ᾽ οἱ βασιλεῖς τέτταρα καὶ πέντε προϊέμενοι τάλαντα δοκῶσί τι ποιεῖν μέγα καὶ ζητῶσι τὴν αὐτὴν ὑπάρχειν αὐτοῖς εὔνοιαν καὶ τιμὴν παρὰ τῶν Ἑλλήνων, ἣν οἱ πρὸ τοῦ βασιλεῖς εἶχον, [7] αἵ τε πόλεις λαμβάνουσαι πρὸ ὀφθαλμῶν τὸ μέγεθος τῶν πρότερον δωρεῶν μὴ λανθάνωσιν ἐπὶ μικροῖς καὶ τοῖς τυχοῦσι νῦν τὰς μεγίστας καὶ καλλίστας προϊέμεναι τιμάς, [8] ἀλλὰ πειρῶνται τὸ κατ᾽ ἀξίαν ἑκάστοις τηρεῖν, ᾧ πλεῖστον διαφέρουσιν Ἕλληνες τῶν ἄλλων ἀνθρώπων.

Nor were Prusias and Mithridates far behind these in liberality; nor the princes Lysanias, Olympichus, and Lymnaeas, who were at that time in power in different parts of Asia; and as for states that, according to their several abilities contributed to their assistance, it would be difficult to reckon their number. In fact, though when we regard the time which it took the city to recover its populousness, and the state of desolation from which it started, we cannot fail to be struck at the rapidity and the extent of its improvement in regard both to private and public wealth; yet when we contemplate the natural advantages of its site, and the contributions from outside which served to raise its fortunes to their original height, this feeling must give way to a conviction that the advance was somewhat less than might have been expected.
My object in giving these details is twofold. I wished to exhibit the brilliant conduct of their public affairs by the Rhodians, for indeed they deserve both to be commended and imitated: and I wished also to point out the insignificance of the gifts bestowed by the kings of our own day, and received by nations and states; that these monarchs may not imagine that by the expenditure of four or five talents they are doing anything so very great, or expect to receive at the hands of the Greeks the honour enjoyed by former kings; and that states when they see before their eyes the magnitude of the presents formerly bestowed, may not, nowadays, in return for insignificant and paltry benefactions, blindly bestow their most ample and splendid honours; but may use that discrimination in apportioning their favours to desert, in which Greeks excel the rest of the world.

Texts and translations taken from Perseus.

Edited by Nescio
ce
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As to how the Colossus would have looked, any interpretation is speculative, of course. What can be safely deduced:

  • The statue was made of bronze, hollow with rocks inside, and 70 cubits tall, i.e. 32.4 m (a Greek cubit (πῆχυς) was 24 × 19.3 mm = 0.4623 m).
  • It stood on a pedestal, covered in shiny, polished, white marble, overlooking the harbour.
  • Work started in 292 BC, finished in 280 BC, broken in 226 BC, and finally dismantled in AD 653.
  • It was technically impossible to reerect it (hence the convenient oracle).
  • The fact it broke of at the knees implies the statue stood on two legs, i.e. there was not a third support point (e.g. a tree trunk, clothes touching the ground, a spear).
  • If it had fallen forward, it would have blocked the harbour; that didn't happen, it lay on land, therefore it must have fallen backwards, thus Helios (the sun) was facing the sky (and the sun).

Furthermore:

  • There is no need to shout “censorship”; whether it was fully clothed, scantly clad, or heroically naked is unknown; each is a plausible possibility.
  • The association of Apollo with the sun is Roman; Sol Invictus became a popular deity later during the principate. The Colossus of Rhodes would not have looked like a statue of Apollo, the Colossus of Nero (which gave its name to the nearby Colosseum), or Roman depictions of the sun god.
  • Coinage from Rhodes usually features a rose (because of the name), though the head of Helios is also a common motive (see these examples on Wikimedia Commons), but never a full statue. The one thing we know is that it most likely had a crown of sun rays around his temple, like the Statue of Liberty (not a coincidence). Furthermore, Helios did not have a beard, as confirmed by this Hellenistic head of Helios, now in the archaeological museum of Rhodes:
    Spoiler

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cc/Head_Helios_AM_Rhodes_E49.jpg

     

  • A relief found nearby shows an Helios (the sun) gazing in the distance with his head above his eyes (shielding them against sun rays). Such a pose would make sense, given that it was positioned at the entrance of the harbour, on the lookout for incoming ships in the distance.

So maybe Dali was on to something.

However, the Colossus stood upright for only about half a century and was a tourist attraction while lying on the ground for eight centuries, so that would actually be the more appropiate representation. :)

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15 minutes ago, Nescio said:

However, the Colossus stood upright for only about half a century and was a tourist attraction while lying on the ground for eight centuries, so that would actually be the more appropiate representation. :)

It would be awesome if you built the Colossus, and then 5 minutes later it spontaneously broke apart and fell over.

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19 minutes ago, wowgetoffyourcellphone said:

It would be awesome if you built the Colossus, and then 5 minutes later it spontaneously broke apart and fell over.

... along with the city walls, arsenals, shipyards, and everything else.

Though since we don't have a Rhodian civilization in game, I don't think the Colossus ought to be buildable.

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2 hours ago, Nescio said:

... along with the city walls, arsenals, shipyards, and everything else.

Though since we don't have a Rhodian civilization in game, I don't think the Colossus ought to be buildable.

It should be a Eyecandy stuff and placed on  special scenario like protect the Wonder/Marvel

Maybe protect from maritime invaders.

 

 

Edited by Lion.Kanzen
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1 hour ago, wowgetoffyourcellphone said:

It could easily be a scenario or campaign or something in EA. Or the destruction of the colossus leaves a permanent rubble that can be mined for metal.

Rhodians and Pergamenes definitely probable for DE eventually.

Pergamon would be a easier faction to do than Rhodes in my opinion, more distinct from other greeks.

Edited by Ultimate Aurelian
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well then it would be the representation of dali the most accurate and combining it with that of looking at the horizon and that can carry in the left hand some interpret it with whip or with a glass the image that I found of a ball that they found

Magic Sphere On the sphere are represented the God Helios, a lion, a dragon and magic symbols. She was found lying near the Dionysos Theater, which plays host to duels and other similar contests when the sphere was created. It has been suggested that the sphere was used in a magical ritual to achieve victory in those contests.

descarga.jpg

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As for the wonders, I believe in my humble opinion that some factions should have two, only that one should choose which and according to the one they choose gives a special bonus. although I know that historically it is not correct for example that those of Spartans built the temple of Artemis or the Colossus. but they are greek and can be there. I am referring to it or it is how I take it, you see this game as well as something to learn from history that someone who plays it says huy I saw in this game the temple of zeus or the Spartans were dressed in a certain way and I know that this game does not It has an exact historical reference because the 0AD does not exist and that civilizations can put it that they have never known. That is why I got here because it is different because each civilization is different from another, that is why I believe that the wonders should be alone is my humble Player's opinion not so much of the experience of playing but of learning something that failed age of empire, I love this saga I have both but they could improve them and they did not do it in the case of age2 people sold it three times, with little improvement , the sad thing is that age 1 could improve it with today's technology and they did not only improve graphics and the rest and the same and more money to the coffers of microsoft, the good thing about 0ad is that it still receives opinions of players that have nothing to do with the developers and you listen, please think about the wonders, they are almost complete, the others are in the mods, they are almost complete.

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As for the colossus, let's make the version of 0ad trying to make it as coherent as possible with the support of the historian Nescio. and not to do it like the images that you had of the middle ages until today.

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good afternoon I would like to have your opinion this is the model that I propose for the colossus I have been creating it since we started this forum on the colossus I would also like to know which of the pedestals they like2142915050_nuevocoloso.thumb.png.ba074b22f5e7d1e0dfcd2975e1be55e7.png

Edited by marius4
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