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Let 0 A.D one RTS game that takes those of African descent seriously.


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The Nubians remained a significant power player in Mediterranean geopolitics. The Romans who conquered most nations along the Mediterranean, never conquered Nubia. The Kushites became a thorn in Rome's side, in 25 BC they took over the Egyptian cities of Syene, Elephantine, Thebes ,and Philae. Rome regained those cities, but became acutely aware of the Nubian threat. Rome sent troops three more times, but was unable to sub-due the Kushites or make Nubia a Roman province.

Administration

The Kushite Empire was divided into provinces run by a pesto (governor). The pesto had subordinates who served specialized functions. Nubian queens were co-rulers with pharaohs. In some cases, they ruled alone.

Military

Kushite soldiers fought with bow and arrow. Nubia was known as the land of the bow. Kushite soldiers were expert archers. Nubian bows were about six feet in length. Arrows were short with poisonous tips. They also fought with clubs, swords, pikes, and hatchets. Kushite military also fought with elephants. They were probably the first to use elephants in warfare in the ancient world. They trained war elephants for export to Egypt. Nubians were expert horsemen. They developed a reputation for horse training. Nubians revered their horse. Some were burried with their horses.

Economic

The Kushite Empire controlled the trade route emanating from central Africa to the Mediterranean. The empire served as a middleman between the two regions. After the Assyrian defeat, Kush became a center of iron production. Cotton was domesticated in the Sudanic region. Nubia manufactured cotton cloth and exported Kushite cloth throughout the Mediterranean.

Religion

Kushite kings worshipped Amun, who they adopted from Egyptians. Jebel Barkal ("pure mountain") in Napata was a sacred site. The site had remains of numerous temples, palaces, and massive store rooms. The cemetery of Sanam Abu Dom was also located in the area. Kushite temples for Amun were similiar to Egyptian temples, but temples for local gods were constructed differently. Downstream were burial grounds of El Kurru and Nuri. By the 4th century, Nuri burial sites were abandon for burial at Meroe.

Related Article: Timeline of African History, Kushite Empire , Ta-Seti , Merkouria , Alwa , Nobatia , Kushite Gods and Goddesses, Meroitic Script, List of Nubian Kings and Queens , Old Nubian Alphabet , Axumite Empire

Works Cited

Collins, Robert O.; Burns, James M. (2007). A History of Sub-Saharan Africa. New York City: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-68708-9

Davidson, Basil (1991). Africa In History, Themes and Outlines. Revised and expanded ed. New York City: Simon & Schuster, pp. 32-33. ISBN 0-684-82667-4

Poe, Richard(1999). Black Spark White Fire, Did African Explorers Civilize Ancient Europe? Prima Publishing: Roseville, California. ISBN 0-7615-2163-1

Török,László(1997). The kingdom of Kush: handbook of the Napatan-Meriotic civilization, Part 1, Volume 31. Brill, ISBN 9004104488, 9789004104488.

Tags: kush nubia sudan meroe napatan

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Wow this escalated quickly! Sorry for my angry tone in the beginning btw - not to belabour any point - it would be hard to explain the cause of it. Anyway, I see that there is indeed some serious in

These civs have been proposed before and so have many others, that's the easy part, in fact a lot of people want to see their region/ancestry represented. It's up to someone putting in the work to res

As has been stated already, the base game is unlikely to have additional factions added to it now, I personally think we have too many already However that doesn't mean I wouldn't love to see more ge

Amanirenas (also spelled Amanirena) was a queen of the Meroitic Kingdom of Kush.

Her full name and title was Amnirense qore li kdwe li ("Ameniras, Qore and Kandake").

She reigned from about 40 BCE to 10 BCE. She is one of the most famous kandakes, because of her role leading Kushite armies against the Romans from in a war that lasted five years, from 27 BCE to 22 BCE. After an initial victory when the Kushites attacked Roman Egypt, they were driven out of Egypt by Publius Petronius and the Romans established a new frontier at Hiere Sycaminos (Maharraqa). Amanirenas was described as brave, and blind in one eye.

Meroitic inscriptions give Amanirenas the title of qore as well as kandake suggesting that she was a ruling queen. She is usually considered to be the queen referred to as "Candace" in Strabo's account of the Meroitic war against the Roman Empire. Her name is associated with those of Teriteqas and Akinidad. The scheme first proposed by Hintze suggests that King Teriteqas died shortly after the beginning of the war. She was succeeded by Akinidad (possibly the son of Teriteqas) who continued the campaign with his mother Amanirenas. Akinidad died at Dakka c.24BC. more from Wikipedia

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Amanishakheto was a Kandake of Nubia. She seems to have reigned from 10 BC to 1 AD, although most dates of Nubian history before the Middle Ages are very uncertain.

In Meroitic hieroglyphs her name is written "Amanikasheto" (Mniskhte or (Am)niskhete). In Meroitic cursive she is referred to as Amaniskheto qor kd(ke) which means Amanishakheto, Qore and Kandake ("Ruler and Queen").

Amanishakheto is known from several monuments. She is mentioned in the Amun-temple of Kawa, on a stela from Meroe, and in inscriptions of a palace building found at Wad ban Naqa, from a stela found at Qasr Ibrim, another stela from Naqa and her pyramid at Meroe (Beg. no. N6).

Amanishakheto is best known for a collection of jewelry found in her pyramid in 1834 by Italian treasure hunter Giuseppe Ferlini, who destroyed the pyramid in search of its burial goods. These pieces are now in the Egyptian Museum of Berlin and in the Egyptian Museum of Munich.

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Amanitore (c. 50 CE) was a Nubian Kandake (queen) of the ancient Kushitic Kingdom of Meroë, which also is referred to as Nubia in many ancient sources. An alternate spelling is Kandace, Kandake, or Kentake. In Egyptian hieroglyphics the throne name of Amanitore reads as Merkare. Many Candaces are described as warrior queens who led forces in battle.

Kandace Amanitore often is mentioned as co-regent with Natakamani although the evidence does not show whether she was his wife or mother.

Her royal palace was at Gebel Barkal which now is a UNESCO heritage site. The area of her rule was between the Nile and the Atbara rivers.

She was part of the Meroitic historical period and her reign began in 1 BC. The rule of her successor, Amanitaraqide, was complete by 50 AD.

Amanitore is mentioned in a number of texts as a ruler. These include the temple at the Nubian capital of Napata in present day Sudan, in a temple in Meroë near Shendi, again in Sudan, and at the Naqa Lion Temple. Images of Natakamani frequently include an image of Amanitore, however, it could be that Amanitore was his mother rather than his wife. A Kandake was a powerful position in the hierarchy of Kush. The mothers would rule and create their sons as rulers, but they also deposed their own sons too. In fact, a Kandake could order the king to commit suicide to end his rule, an order that he was required to follow.

Amanitore is buried in her own pyramid in Meroë. The tomb is approximately six metres square at its base, and not a pyramid in the mathematical sense.

Some sources say otherwise, but she is said to be mentioned in the Bible in the story about the conversion of the Ethiopian in Acts 8:26–40:

Amanitore was among the last great Kush builders. She was involved in restoring the large temple for Amun at Meroë and the Amun temple at Napata after it was demolished by the Romans. Reservoirs for the retention of water also were constructed at Meroë during her reign. The two rulers also built Amun temples at Naqa and Amara.

The quantity of building that was completed during the middle part of the first century indicates that this was the most prosperous time in Meroitic history. More than two hundred Nubian pyramids were built, most plundered in ancient times.

Amanitore has been well regarded by historians and has been included as number thirty-nine on a list of The Fifty Greatest Africans although she sometimes is referred to, incorrectly, as an Egyptian. Her country was immediately south of what was Ancient Egypt and shared its language in surviving texts. Other aspects of the culture differ significantly, but are not well known and others seem to have influenced the Ancient Egyptian culture—including religious influences. It was a wealthy country, having large resources of gold, and exported jewelry, exotic animals, and textiles.

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Alexander Meets Queen Candace

When Alexander the Great invaded Kemet in 332, Kush’s kingdom extended south into Western Ethiopia and as far north as the first cataract, which was just below Kemet’s southern border. After conquering Kemet Alexander decided to continue south to invade Kush, but he had to contend with Candace, one of the “mother queens,” who was the general-in-chief of the army as well as a great military commander and war strategist. As Alexander headed toward the first cataract feeling good about his victories, he saw the Kushite army with its leader Queen Candace, who was sitting on a royally designed bench set across the top of two elephants (Williams 119).

There are different accounts of what actually occurred when Candace confronted Alexander. According to Chancellor Williams, after seeing Candace’s formidable defense of well-trained soldiers armed with iron weapons, Alexander reconsidered his decision to go into battle because his opponent’s air of confidence forced him to think about his winning streak. He also weighed the possibility of losing to a woman general against his reputation. After thoroughly examining the situation, Alexander retreated north. In contrast, William Leo Hansberry says that Alexander met semi-privately with Candace. Legend has it that Candace advised Alexander to leave the region immediately and if he refused, after defeating his army, she would cut off his head and roll it down a hill.

It is difficult to ascertain what transpired between Candace and Alexander, but it is a fact that Alexander did not attempt to invade Kush after Queen Candace and her army confronted him. He left the region and went into Asia. When Alexander died in 323 BCE, one of his generals, Ptolemy I, took control of Kemet. Greek-Macedonian rule of that country lasted approximately 300 years. It ended when the last ruler of the Ptolemy line, Cleopatra, died after she and Roman General Mark Anthony lost their battle over control of Rome to Octavian or Augustus in 30 BCE.

Emperor Augustus and Queen Candace

Not too long after Rome took control of Kemet, it had a dispute with Kush over territorial boundaries. Kush’s kingdom extended to the first cataract, but Roman Emperor Augustus wanted to push Kush further south. As a result, Rome and Kush started fighting in 23 BCE at town near the disputed area called Syene. Another Queen Candace was the general-in-chief of the army when the fighting erupted. During the conflict Kushite military men confiscated a bronze head of Augustus and took it to Meroe. The Kushites won this battle although Roman soldiers wounded Candace.

The Romans tried to recapture Augustus’s bronze head in subsequent battles, but they were unsuccessful. Although the loss of his bronzed likeness infuriated the emperor, he could not do anything about it even after capturing some Kushite soldiers in another battle. By 12 BCE, therefore, Augustus conceded the first cataract to Kush. Augustus and all other Roman emperors became very friendly and extremely cordial to Kush for the remainder of its existence, which lasted until 350 CE.

Sources:

Diop, Cheikh Anta. The African Origin of Civilization. Ed. Trans. Mercer Cook. Westport: Lawrence Hill & Company, 1974.

Hansberry, William Leo. Pillars in Ethiopian History, Vol. I. Ed. Joseph E. Harris. Washington, D.C. Howard University Press, 1981.

Williams, Chancellor. The Destruction of Black Civilization. Chicago: Third World Press, 1987.

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Lion, can't you just give us a link to these sources rather than copy pasting the text in full? It really makes it a pain to see what other people are saying.

sorry but you never know if links continuing keep working.some day there are other day, the links is dead. I can i start new topic.

@Feneur can you move all my research in an other topic ?

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To walk in here demanding an "African civilization" and claim that anyone who does not agree is racist and a fan of slavery, is extremely lazy and insulting to a lot of the artists and programmer who have been working on this project.

Not what I'm saying. But I've made my point already so I won't repeat myself.

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Anyway, I see that there is indeed some serious interest. I'm in for a mod.

Very well.

The Kushite-Nubians, according to zophim's list, is one of the proposed civs for the Aristeia mod. Lion has provided information and references above about them, and there's also an older thread concerning them. Zophim even put together a rough design specification that can be found in PDF format in this post or M$ Word format in this one.

It makes sense to use work that's already been done as a starting point; so unless you have a different african civ you particularly wish to see implemented first, I advise you download one or both of zophim's current design specs (as I don't know if they are entirely identical) the M$ Word version as it's more complete, read though it, and make suggestions.

Further african civilisations can be considered once the Kushite-Nubians are nearing completion.

Edit: After looking at zophim's design specification documents, it appears the M$ Word version is more complete.

Edited by s0600204
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The difference is little, they have very strong Egyptian look, I don't say influence because Egyptian can have some Nubian Influence they was conquers by Nubians and then was when they enter into a conflict with Assyrians.

I recommend based only in Kushite Meroic time frame. But The Axumites replace them later.

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Wow this escalated quickly!

Sorry for my angry tone in the beginning btw - not to belabour any point - it would be hard to explain the cause of it.

Anyway, I see that there is indeed some serious interest. I'm in for a mod.

I can understeand ur proposal in ur first post. My country (Poland) is also rarerly in games though it was huge power in medieval times.

Also slavs are rarerly shown in games tough they had very interesting relligion, architecture and culture.

But as I said before I think that Africa is also ignored very often by game devs. It's sad because It's very interesting and mysterious continent.

Edited by Byamarro
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These civs have been proposed before and so have many others, that's the easy part, in fact a lot of people want to see their region/ancestry represented. It's up to someone putting in the work to research and design them, and most importantly take the lead and follow through with the project long-term :) I guess what I can add from an 'inside' perspective: we're not looking for new civs to implement, it will be more than enough work to finish what we have already (some have been of the opinion we have too many civs - when I joined the project, we were only planning 6 civs for part 1! Former designer/lead decided to bump that number over time, but we're not in the position to continue that trend now)

Adding a civ is definitely a lot of work, not like a week long project but months/years. That shouldn't dissuade anyone but rather challenge them if it's something they want, but it does need a leader. Check out all the work that went into making the Mauryan crowd-sourced civ a success.

One thing is the topics seem to be forgotten, maybe someone should organize proposed civs with links to the topics, for reference and to prevent them being forgotten if they aren't bumped for a few weeks?

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These civs have been proposed before and so have many others, that's the easy part, in fact a lot of people want to see their region/ancestry represented. It's up to someone putting in the work to research and design them, and most importantly take the lead and follow through with the project long-term :) I guess what I can add from an 'inside' perspective: we're not looking for new civs to implement, it will be more than enough work to finish what we have already (some have been of the opinion we have too many civs - when I joined the project, we were only planning 6 civs for part 1! Former designer/lead decided to bump that number over time, but we're not in the position to continue that trend now)Adding a civ is definitely a lot of work, not like a week long project but months/years. That shouldn't dissuade anyone but rather challenge them if it's something they want, but it does need a leader. Check out all the work that went into making the Mauryan crowd-sourced civ a success.One thing is the topics seem to be forgotten, maybe someone should organize proposed civs with links to the topics, for reference and to prevent them being forgotten if they aren't bumped for a few weeks?

When people talk to add new civs to main game, that's remember to me AOK and their last expansion the Forgotten.

May be the project to add more civilizations can be done beyond second part of the official game, when players demand new content.

The players wants always more stuff for games their games, that why exists expansions and DLC.

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I'm pretty sure that people are willing to help you to get your mod going (think in the direction of organisational aspects) but if you think it is a better idea to contribute to an existing project then you're welcome too :yes3:

Edited by niektb
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I recall seeing black Roman legionaries in a History Channel documentary (when that channel was still good and made shows actually about history), so that could be fitting for the Romans at least.

but not in our Romans,our romans are based in Punic wars(according document design) I think this can be nice for post Marian reform units, especially Auxiliar army.
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I'm not sure that even post marian reform units had black troops, they were still either italian latin or roman, the reform just opened up to anyone who was a member of the "capite sensi" (or headcount/those counted by the head).

However, when auxiliaries came into play (when they ran out of men from italy/latium/rome) black troops aren't that unlikely.

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