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Warrior Womens


jurgenjuggernaut
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As well known in the british isles before the invasion of rome, Womens were same as men and were able to fight or have lands on their own. I suggest that british celt womans to have more cost but being able to fight

I trust you and would like to see that as well but do you have a source ?

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Lots of references for women warriors in Celtic cultures the tribal laws where quite equal in their dealing with gender including about 8 different marriage/partnership arrangements with means of handling the property of both members.Not many women actually trained exclusivity as warriors but is was always an option for any female.All this can be found in the Celtic sagas in their various translations.

Enjoy the Choice :)

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Lots of references for women warriors in Celtic cultures the tribal laws where quite equal in their dealing with gender including about 8 different marriage/partnership arrangements with means of handling the property of both members.Not many women actually trained exclusivity as warriors but is was always an option for any female.All this can be found in the Celtic sagas in their various translations.

Enjoy the Choice :)

I knew that gaul women had the same rights if not more than gaul men. I wonder why this wasn't used as a civ specific options. It used to be mythos to be asked for such questions now I don't know who is in charge for it.

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"Girls as well as boys could be trained to fight with swords and other weapons. One of the most prominent training schools in Gaelic mythology was run by Scathach (pronounced “sca-hah” or “skya”), a woman warrior from what is now Scotland. She trained the greatest hero of Irish legend, Cúchulainn"


"The practice of bearing arms was relatively common among women. Women were recorded as having taken part in the final battle against Caius Suetonius Paulinus when he advanced upon the druid stronghold on the island of Mona (now Anglesey) in present-day Wales. In this case, they seem to have made great use of psychological tactics such as screeching, dancing wildly, and pulling at their faces, frightening the Romans enough to hold them off for a time."
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"Girls as well as boys could be trained to fight with swords and other weapons. One of the most prominent training schools in Gaelic mythology was run by Scathach (pronounced “sca-hah” or “skya”), a woman warrior from what is now Scotland. She trained the greatest hero of Irish legend, Cúchulainn"
"The practice of bearing arms was relatively common among women. Women were recorded as having taken part in the final battle against Caius Suetonius Paulinus when he advanced upon the druid stronghold on the island of Mona (now Anglesey) in present-day Wales. In this case, they seem to have made great use of psychological tactics such as screeching, dancing wildly, and pulling at their faces, frightening the Romans enough to hold them off for a time."

We could make it a tech ?

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