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  1. @balduin Thanks! I have definitely been neglecting the water units for all of the civs. But I think I can fix that in the following days. Right now my focus is on playtesting everything, so I don't have much more to show. Here's some .pngs I did for fun, I suppose that something like this (with some corrections) could work for the concept art (although concept art is usually done before 3d modeling). I should probably remove the brick floors, since these would not be seen during the game, except if the building is on uneven terrain.
    5 points
  2. The Solomonic Dynasty and the Zagweans are both Christian dynasties. In my opinion the cultural change from one dynasty to another was very minimal. I assume the biggest change from one Dynasty to another was the bloodline of he Emperor. In addition, "The church of Genneta Maryam, which is traditionally believed to have been built by Yekuno Amlak" Furthermore, the Sacred Landscapes of Tigray has 121 rock-hewn churches dating anywhere between the 5th and 14th century AD. Rock-hewn churches are very common in Ethiopia. In addition, I think they survived over several hundred years, simply because they are build from the rock.
    3 points
  3. They're actually still being built today... https://www.addisherald.com/ethiopian-modern-rock-hewan-churches/ Indeed, they did. I only realized this past year. Give me some time and I might be able to scrounge up some more references. Yes, but the Futuh Al Habasi is a period account written by an eye-witness. If Sihab ad-Din Ahmad bin 'Abd al-Qader saw chainmail, there was probably chainmail. Probably not a lot. But apparently enough to equip some elite units.
    2 points
  4. I actually think they used some quilted cotton armors. However, I was unable to find anything definitive. Almost all the wall paintings from the Ethiopian churches show Ethiopian warriors without chainmails. Even later in photographs and engravings none of them show warriors with chainmails. However, what you see a lot with the Portuguese arrival is guns. The Ethiopians were very fast in adopting guns. What surprises me is, that the Ethiopians were more willing to accept weapons from Christian empires, than from the Muslims.
    2 points
  5. Yes, you are right. Yes, you are right again. However, unless you implement the people from the Swahili coast, what ships should the Kingdom of Zimbabwe have? One trick would be make them mercenary ships from the people of the Swahili coast.
    2 points
  6. I've never seen chain mail on Abyssinians, so I was originally inclined to think that it would probably be inaccurate, as far as I could tell... But it turns out I was wrong. As a source the article cites ''Conquest of Abyssinia by Shibab ad-Din pg 43''. Yeah, but those were muslim enemies of Abyssinia. BUT, I learned about some other passages in the Futuh Al-Habasa (Conquest of Abyssinia), from a Portuguese history teacher I sometimes interact with on Historum, called Tulius. I'll just quote him: So, yeah, to my utter surprise, they did indeed use chainmail to some degree... The only depiction I've ever seen of Ethiopian chainmail was an Osprey illustration, depicting an Ethiopian noble cavalry man, alongside Portuguese allies during the Abyssinian-Adal war: Heroes could use these quilted cotton armors (or perhaps just caparisons?):
    2 points
  7. Mahdists, from modern day Sudan: . Yeah, chain mail was widespread from Sudan, To Bornu:
    2 points
  8. I don't think the Kingdom of Zimbabwe ever stretched to the coast. I think dhows might be inappropriate for them. The Kingdom of Mutapa, successor of Zimbabwe, did actually stretch to the coast and ruled Sofala the main port of the region. The actual sailing was done by resident Swahili's from the coast.
    2 points
  9. The title of the Ethiopian Emperor was nəgusä nägäst which means Kings of Kings. This title should be understood literally. For example, the Sultanat of Ifat was a Muslim "Kindgdom". Ifat rebelled against Amda Seyon I, who defeated the rebels of Ifat. Afterwards Amda Seyon I decided who can become king, he selected members of the Walashma dynasty, the same dynasty rebelling against him. Basically, Ifat was more or less a Kindgdom in the Ethiopian Kindgdom. The major difference between both was the religion. The Ethiopians were Christians and the people of the Sultanat of Ifat Muslims. Ifat was rich because of the sea trade with Asian and Arabic countries. The trading ships used were dhows. They used the same trading network as the Zimbabweans. Therefore both the Zimbabweans and Ethiopians should have the dhow as trading ship:
    2 points
  10. The working title for the mod I'm making is "African Empires", for now at least. It's inspired by Age of Empires 2: The African Kingdoms. It will have four civs: Ethiopian Empire, Mali Empire, Marinid Sultanate, and Kingdom of Zimbabwe. The timeline is Medieval / Early Modern, roughly 1000 - 1500. I have almost completed the Malian civ. This thread is for the Ethiopian Empire. It began in the 13th century and lasted until the 20th. Ethiopian architecture changed throughout it's history. For the civ I'm recreating, I will focus mostly on the aesthetic from the Zagwe period (900 to 1270). However, the buildings for the city phase, particularly the fortress, will have a Gondarine style. Some Aksumite architecture can be incorporated, but it should not be the dominant style. Here is a work in progress of the fortress. It's based on Fasil Ghebbi. Right now it looks very basic, I have to make all of the details and fix the texture.
    1 point
  11. I am sure we all agree that a tournament with less then 50% of games played makes little sense. Also it is unfair for teams that make time, just to see that enemy team did not appear, without even leaving a note in advance. Therefore i open this thread to discussing possibilities for improvement, especially concerning the following topics. If you find yourself unable to formulate constructive criticism that makes at least some amount of sense this is not the thread to do it. Team making: Next time first collect all players and then make balanced teams More fun to play balanced matches -> higher motivation We can make bigger teams so it is more likely at least 2 players have time Disadvantages Complicates process as ppl might not agree with teammates Lower motivation by beeing forced in team with social nub teammates More flexible schedules higher motivation for both teams to find date to play Disadvantages more self organization necessary which did for the most not happen in first tournament Banning Teams that didnt play for some games at all Banning Toxic Players Using Challonge Having Resposible Team Captains (mandatory from beginning)
    1 point
  12. They could be called just Ethiopians or Abyssinians; the Roman civ in the game is called Romans (Instead of res publica). I am not sure about using rock churches for all buildings; might give off the wrong impression and make it look like whole cities were built from rock. My suggestion would be keep rock churches for temple and tower; barracks could be vernacular or in the CC's style. For fortress a similar style as the CC but applied to fortress footprint (Or maybe base it on Gabriel-rufael church, although i have doubts if it was a fortress). Walls could be based on Balduin's suggestion (For gameplay, add simple towers to them like roman siege wall or Zimbabwean wall), i quoted his post bellow for convenience:
    1 point
  13. So, should the civ be called Solomonics? Or Ethiopians. Because here's what I'm thinking: this civ could be split into several. One of them would have Gondarine buildings, but that will be for the future. Another one would have Lalibela style buildings. These would be the Zagweans, or Solomonics. I still think Philipson's theory about some of the rock churches actually being fortresses is worth looking into. If this is so, then the CC, barracks, walls, fortress and temple could be based on different rock churches. I'm already using Bet Danaghel for the defense tower, so why not? Or maybe I'm just wrong lol
    1 point
  14. It is interesting that there is no clear record of the Solomonic capital before Gondar; it's possible that Lalibela remained the capital, after the end of Zagwe period. Do you think the Malians could have mail as well, or should they just have padded armor ?
    1 point
  15. i think early Solomonic period (around 1270-1529) might be better. Rock churches are not very inaccurate for that period (They were very likely still used for worship); but the current CC would be inaccurate for Zagwe (Based on the 14th century Debre Abbay monastery).
    1 point
  16. The buildings look great. The unnecessary brick floors can be substituted with deeper walls and more steps for the stairs. Your sentry tower is a good example. For some, the stairs can continue left, right, or forked in both directions as long as the boundary is not compromised. Keep in mind that the first/ground floor height should be more than close to the human actor’s, and floors higher up than that can be bit smaller. As 0 A.D. transitions to Alpha 24, you might want to add these structures to your African Kingdoms modification: Stable Siege Workshop For possible scenarios, here are some other optional ones that you can model if you have some time: Archery Range (refer to Borg’s Mod and Delenda Est modifications for inspiration) Large House/Apartment Complex Naval Shipyard (if any one of them has a powerful navy) Outpost (the simple wooden watchtower at Village Phase, can be unique model for each faction)
    1 point
  17. Do you think it would be inaccurate to use it for Ethiopian units ? According to wikipedia Somalia used mail as well: As a source the article cites ''Conquest of Abyssinia by Shibab ad-Din pg 43''.
    1 point
  18. According to Wikipedia the Kingdom of Zimbabwe had many Asian and Arabic goods. That means they needed to get them by ship. The monsoon 'trade winds' allowed merchants to travel between Asia (especially India) and East Africa. The following map shows the trade routes. Many of them went over the ocean. Makoro are good for fishing, but not long distance trade routes. For trading dhows where used. There are several different types of dhows, some for fishing some for trading. source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dhow_znz.jpg source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dhow01.JPG Baggala (large dhow): source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sd2-baggala.JPG Dhows should be the trading vessels for both the Zambians and the Ethiopians. As both Kingdoms where connected by the same trading network.
    1 point
  19. The Kingdom of Zimbabwe was according to this map landlocked. However, the Zambezi river flows through the country, as well as several other rivers. The Zambezi ends up in the Indian Ocean. source: https://www.themaparchive.com/great-zimbabwe-c-1000.html Zambia fishing boats: source: https://artofsafari.travel/what-to-do/luxury-safaris-zambia/lower-zambezi-national-park/tiger-fishing-zambia/ Drinking, fishing, washing, transporting: the Zambezi River provides many services for resident people in its basin (photo credit: ETH Zurich/Elisa Calamita/Davide Vanzo) source: https://blogs.ethz.ch/ETHambassadors/2019/05/23/understanding-the-role-of-big-rivers-in-africa/ source: https://kevdieenglesman.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/zambezi-tiger-fishing/ source: https://www.internationalrivers.org/blogs/1104/the-zambezi-river-drained-bone-dry source: https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-local-people-fishing-village-zambezi-river-caprivi-namibia-africa-30529047.html source: https://www.gettyimages.de/detail/foto/zambezi-fisherman-lizenzfreies-bild/1075568204 source: https://neweralive.na/posts/fishing-moratorium-effected-in-zambezi source: https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-local-fisherman-zambezi-river-kasane-caprivi-namibia-africa-travel-30529071.html This boat type is called Makoro. In Zambia they still make them out of wood. source:https://vimeo.com/74689659 Great Zimbabwe did occupy parts of Botswana. Dombshaba is evidence of their reach. I think the Makoro should be the fishing boat of the Zimbabweans.
    1 point
  20. The Bozo people live mostly along the Niger River in Mali as well as the seasonal Lake Débo. They are the fishermen of Mali. They use a canoe (or pirogue) for fishing and transporting goods. source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pirogue_010.jpg source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pêcheur_Bozo.JPG source: http://www.galenfrysinger.com/niger_river.htm source: https://www.onhiatus.com/journal/journal.cgi/19981108.html source: http://www.ibike.org/bikeafrica/mali/essay/02-koulikoro.htm source: https://www.danheller.com/images/Africa/Mali/River/Slideshow/img5.html source: https://www.activityvillage.co.uk/mali source: http://gei.aerobaticsweb.org/mali_niger.html source: https://www.fotolibra.com/gallery/1354008/the-royal-niger-companys-expedition-everyday-scenes-on-the-river-niger-1897-a-market-canoe-arriv/ source: Gahna has similar boats: source: https://www.dreamstime.com/editorial-photo-local-residents-near-fishing-boat-ghana-cape-coast-west-africa-july-parked-boats-main-occupation-locals-part-image49616776 source: https://2012books.lardbucket.org/books/regional-geography-of-the-world-globalization-people-and-places/s10-03-west-africa.html Senegal as well: source: https://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photography-africa-senegal-atlantic-coast-fishermen-boats-image12703882 source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Admiral_François-Edmond_Pâris_-_1845_-_Senegal_Boat.png I think, that the design did not change much from over the last couple of centuries. It would be nice to include this boat type both as trading ship and fishing boat.
    1 point
  21. Miltiades "Thracian Colonies" Civic Centers -50% build time while Miltiades lives. Themistocles "Piraeus Fortifications" Walls and Shipyards +20% health while Themistocles lives.
    1 point
  22. HoMM3 was my favorite of the series, although the 2nd one was really good as well.
    1 point
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