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===[COMMITTED]=== Roman Infantry (New texture)

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22 minutes ago, wowgetoffyourcellphone said:

Nah, looks fine. I think the fold lines are too dark though (they look like stripes atm). It's quilted linen. 

We had to tweak it, the earlier texture was not visible enough from a distance.

I was thinking that artillery crew were not likely in front lines and had them light armored but I will still add a chainmail in the ratio.

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Carthaginians carry some some Hellenistic kingdoms too.

the armor is very ancient but  I never see any republic before Imperial. greek uses this kind but,.. even for them ....

https://www.romanarmytalk.com/rat/archive/index.php/thread-19433-1.html

https://www.celticwebmerchant.com/en/deepeeka-lorica-squamata.html

Resultado de imagen para lorica "squamata" origin

but there a source about this.

Quote

At.GIFnother type of cuirass was the lorica squamata, also known as scaled or jezeraint armour. Scale armour is perhaps the oldest type of metal body armour. Peterson (1992: 42) proposed that its origins date to at least the 2nd millennium B.C., having a long history of use in Greece and the East. Despite its early origins it was used throughout the entire period of Roman dominance. Scale armour is usually depicted with short sleeves, and the lower edges reaching the upper thighs, as in the sculpture of Q. Sertorius Festus on a grave stela. Alternately, the marble relief in the Palazzo Ducale, Mantua, shows a lorica squamata, worn by a 1st century legionary. This is sleeveless with broad reinforcing shoulder-straps that fit together from throat to breast-bone. The straps have cut-away outer corners and are edged with leather piping, as is the neck of the garment (Robinson 1975: 157).

Scale armour was made from both iron and bronze. The manufacture of scale armour involved small sections of metal sheeting of varying sizes being attached by wires or riveted to their neighbours and sewn onto a suitably flexible foundation of hide or strong cloth. Early scale armour was commonly joined by small twisted links of bronze wiring, positioned in horizontal rows, overlapping upwards and imbricated like scales of a fish or in the manner of roof tiles (Tarassuk & Blair 1982: 311, see image SC1). The size of these scales range from small bronze specimens of 2.8 cm by 1.4 cm to iron ones 8 cm by 5.4 cm (Robinson 1975: 154, see image SC2). Scales commonly had rounded lower ends, though some are simply cut into sharp points or have a straight bottom edge and their corners cut off at an angle (Robinson 1975: 154). Evidence of parts of a bronze lorica squamata were found at the site of Corstopitum (Corbridge) in Northumberland England. These scales were very small, and due to the expense incurred in manufacturing such fine armour, Simkins (1994a: 15) proposes that the man, probably an officer, no doubt would have purchased this armour himself. A similar group of 346 scales which was found in the fort of Newstead (c.A.D. 98-100), of yellow bronze (perhaps a result of oxidization), are larger measuring 2.9 cm by 1.2 cm (Robinson 1975: 

http://rubens.anu.edu.au/raid1/student_projects97/armour/scale/scale.html

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I might have to second wow's suggestion for more subtlety in the quilted armor. Something as simple as some very faint folds within the quilts could do you justice too, as it stands it does look like surface design.

Best option of course would be to sculpt it in blender but that's quite a bit of a length to go for such a compact texture lol

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could you toss me the file? I do love me some gambeson, might try the blender approach to see how much a mess it makes

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Thoughts? Really the advanced ptolemaic pikemen are the gold standard as far as quilted armor in game is concerned atm imo

screenshot0110.png

quilt1_edit.png

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Modified the Roman Montefortino mesh and added some prop points for the Extraordinarius helmet in order to update the old prop with the newer mesh.

Also added a variant without cheek guards.

060319 - Romans (3).jpg

The Montefortino without cheek guards and a single plume on top of it was based on the original actor file for the Equites (as seen in the old screenshot below)

screenshot0016.jpg

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On 6/3/2019 at 10:58 PM, wowgetoffyourcellphone said:

I think the neck hole on the bronze armor is too big. Otherwise it looks nice.

It was adjustments to the m_amor_tunic mesh variant. Using normal m_tunic mesh variant reduces the gap. :)

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