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Doktoreus

Specific Name Review: Units

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13 minutes ago, Lion.Kanzen said:

what about sacred groves as SB 3 or 4 ?

Sacred grove, shrines, heroic statue are possible as well.

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13 hours ago, Genava55 said:

It is assumed that the word druid comes from Proto-Celtic *druwits / *druwid. As reported by the Romans, Druid is the use in gaulish. If we assume singular Druid, then it is Druides in plural form. In Scottish Gaelic, singular form is draoidh and plural is draoidhean. In Old Irish, the singular forms are either drui or druid. So I would say Druid and Druides are correct for both Gauls and Britons.

Nick is fine.

What I know is that both Druidae and Druidēs (plural) appear in Latin texts; singular forms are not attested. Greek authors have Δρυΐδης Druidēs (singular). Moreover, the word possibly has a Proto-Indo-European origin, because Sanskrit has dru- “wood” and Greek has δρῦς (tree, wood), from which Δρῠάς (Dryad; wood nymph), δρῠΐνας (a serpent living in wooden oaks), δρύϊνος (oaken), δρῡμόνιος (haunting the woods; an epithet of Artemis), and δόρυ (spear), amongst other words, are derived.

For the druid specific name in 0 A.D., the question is what would be the singular in the languages used by the Gauls and Britons. I don't know.

Furthermore, it would be nice if you could have a critical look at the specific names used by the Celtic units, if you've not done so already somewhere, to have no obvious mistakes in the specific names when A24 will be released. Latin and Persian specific names were checked a couple of monts ago and I assume @Sundiata did that for the Kushites (though we still need to find people for the languages used by Carthaginians, Iberians, and Mauryas).

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6 hours ago, Nescio said:

What I know is that both Druidae and Druidēs (plural) appear in Latin texts; singular forms are not attested. Greek authors have Δρυΐδης Druidēs (singular). Moreover, the word possibly has a Proto-Indo-European origin, because Sanskrit has dru- “wood” and Greek has δρῦς (tree, wood), from which Δρῠάς (Dryad; wood nymph), δρῠΐνας (a serpent living in wooden oaks), δρύϊνος (oaken), δρῡμόνιος (haunting the woods; an epithet of Artemis), and δόρυ (spear), amongst other words, are derived.

Checked what Delamarre says about the druid and he suggests druis as singular nominative while Savignac suggests druid as singular nominative. Delamarre starts from the case of a "druias", a female druid reported by Ælius Lampridus. Personnally I find the druid and druides more probable.

@wackyserious do you want to do a female version of the druid?

7 hours ago, Nescio said:

(though we still need to find people for the languages used by Carthaginians, Iberians, and Mauryas)

You will wait a long time if you are hoping to find someone specialized in the Iberian language. It is still not decipherable. The only solution I see is to assume a connection with proto-Basque. Which is probably the less wrong solution.

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59 minutes ago, Genava55 said:

Checked what Delamarre says about the druid and he suggests druis as singular nominative while Savignac suggests druid as singular nominative. Delamarre starts from the case of a "druias", a female druid reported by Ælius Lampridus. Personnally I find the druid and druides more probable.

Thanks; updated the patch.

59 minutes ago, Genava55 said:

You will wait a long time if you are hoping to find someone specialized in the Iberian language. It is still not decipherable. The only solution I see is to assume a connection with proto-Basque. Which is probably the less wrong solution.

Actually I meant the languages used by those in 0 A.D. (Basque, Hebrew, Sanskrit?) I'm not expecting an expert on the ancient Iberian language, of which only a small number of short inscriptions exist, not even enough to determine to which family the language belonged.

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On 1/5/2020 at 11:19 PM, Genava55 said:

It is assumed that the word druid comes from Proto-Celtic *druwits / *druwid. As reported by the Romans, Druid is the use in gaulish. If we assume singular Druid, then it is Druides in plural form. In Scottish Gaelic, singular form is draoidh and plural is draoidhean. In Old Irish, the singular forms are either drui or druid. So I would say Druid and Druides are correct for both Gauls and Britons.

For the Britons, I did not find an old Brythonic or old Welsh dictionary, so this is the best I could find:

Brythonic:

Cornish: drewydh n.m drewydhyon

Welsh: derwydd eg derwyddon

Breton: drouiz

Using Brythonic would be better than using Goidelic, but just for reference:

druí Note the accent on the i, it's very important for vowel length.

The "druid" form does not seem to be the nominative singular, so we shouldn't use it. Looks like "druídh" is the nominative plural - from eDIL:

dá n-iccad a.¤ oendrúad if the skill of any druid were of avail

 ¤druí druidess; female skilled in magic arts: tri ferdruid ┐ tri bandrúid, TBC-LL¹ 2402 = dī (leg. tri) drúid insin ┐ a teóra mná, TBC-I¹ 1767. bandrai ┐ bancumachtach mē, ZCP xii 252.14 . a mhaca na bandrúagh = of the sorceress, Isaiah lvii 3.

tangadar druídh baidsidhe in meic i ngeintliucht. Gur chansat an mbaithis ngeintlidhe forin mac beg ' druids came to baptize the boy into paganism. They chanted the pagan baptism over the little boy',

ro-lá conflicht ros conaig (MSS. rusconaigh, ros conuigh) | risna druídib díthoraid 'contended with the barren druids and overcame them'

Edited by GunChleoc
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4 minutes ago, GunChleoc said:

For the Britons, I did not find an old Brythonic or old Welsh dictionary, so this is the best I could find:

Brythonic:

Cornish: drewydh n.m drewydhyon

Welsh: derwydd eg derwyddon

Breton: drouiz

Using Brythonic would be better than using Goidelic, but just for reference:

druí Note the accent on the i, it's very important for vowel length.

The "druid" form does not seem to be the nominative singular, so we shouldn't use it. Looks like "druídh" is the nominative plural - from eDIL:

dá n-iccad a.¤ oendrúad if the skill of any druid were of avail

 ¤druí druidess; female skilled in magic arts: tri ferdruid ┐ tri bandrúid, TBC-LL¹ 2402 = dī (leg. tri) drúid insin ┐ a teóra mná, TBC-I¹ 1767. bandrai ┐ bancumachtach mē, ZCP xii 252.14 . a mhaca na bandrúagh = of the sorceress, Isaiah lvii 3.

tangadar druídh baidsidhe in meic i ngeintliucht. Gur chansat an mbaithis ngeintlidhe forin mac beg ' druids came to baptize the boy into paganism. They chanted the pagan baptism over the little boy',

ro-lá conflicht ros conaig (MSS. rusconaigh, ros conuigh) | risna druídib díthoraid 'contended with the barren druids and overcame them'

So the point of view of Delamarre for a Gaulish druis has your preference? It is very probable that Common Brittonic and Gaulish used the same word.

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The only thing I know about Gaulish is that it is Mainland Celtic as opposed to Insular Celtic (Brythonic, Goidelic). It might have influenced Breton though, because it's strikingly different from modern Welsh and Cornish. I'd be fine with either druid or druis I guess, although the -d seems to be more common across the languages. Keep in mind that Breton is Insular Celtic - people fled from Britain to Brittany and took their language with them.

For the Bretons, unless we find a source for Brythonic, we could use drewydh/drewydd, plural drewydhyon/drewyddon as a base line. The der- in Welsh looks like an innovation, and dh/dd looks like mostly spelling differences to me, or a slight shift in the consonant.

According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Welsh, modern -ewydd, is -ouid in old Welsh, which would give us drouid. Unfortunately, there's nothing usable on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Brittonic  for this word.

Also, take anything I say with a grain of salt, since I don't have any knowledge about these languages per se except what similarity I can find to modern Scottish Gaelic + some general linguistic training.

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No worries, another patch can always bee made.

There's translations in

There are still some gaps, but I don't know enough about these languages to fill them. I once got 2 hours of modern Welsh lesson, which is not enough to be able to reconstruct common Brythonic, and I can't afford the time to learn.

 

ETA: Found something interesting for "Druid" in our cognates database: http://www2.smo.uhi.ac.uk/teanga/bunadas/f.php?f=1042

Oldest British from there is do-are-wid

Edited by GunChleoc

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@GunChleoc Nice, I didn't know that page existed. It should be ported to the wiki...

I updated the page with the supported orders. So for instance, there is no distinction per se for gathering, but units might have special sounds for them. (e.g. all units will use the generic "gather" order, but the fishing ship will have a specific order sound.

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Maybe just link it up from the wiki for now? There is more stuff in that thread than the initial table, including some discussions and more languages.

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1 minute ago, GunChleoc said:

Maybe just link it up from the wiki for now? There is more stuff in that thread than the initial table, including some discussions and more languages.

Could work yes :)

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1 hour ago, GunChleoc said:

The only thing I know about Gaulish is that it is Mainland Celtic as opposed to Insular Celtic (Brythonic, Goidelic). It might have influenced Breton though, because it's strikingly different from modern Welsh and Cornish. I'd be fine with either druid or druis I guess, although the -d seems to be more common across the languages. Keep in mind that Breton is Insular Celtic - people fled from Britain to Brittany and took their language with them.

The debate between a Gallo-Brittonic origin or an Insular origin with influences from the continent is still going. Basically, there are two main models:

image.png.b05a1de67981f4bc8ff86057b1848386.png

image.thumb.png.c5301d671749fdb6ba387eac12617ff9.png

 

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On 1/18/2019 at 2:06 AM, Sundiata said:

They're correct, but they are missing proper diacritics for now, so I'll go through them again and adjust where necessary. I'll post an updated list here when it's done.  

Did this happen? If so, when?

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9 minutes ago, Nescio said:

Did this happen? If so, when?

Nope, I honestly don't have time for the moment. 

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41 minutes ago, Sundiata said:

Nope, I honestly don't have time for the moment. 

That's fine, there is no rush, I was just checking what has been done so far.

Commits I remember:

  • 22620 : Roman specific names
  • 22719 : Persian specific names
  • 23338 : healer names
  • 23421 : Greek hero names

 

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On 6/27/2019 at 11:55 AM, Anaxandridas ho Skandiates said:

athen_ship_merchant.xml, Naus Emporia, Merchantman

Why? The current name, πλοῖον φορτηγικόν ploion phortēgikon does mean “ship of burden, merchantman”; you can find it in your LSJ; πλοῖον στρογγύλον ploion strongylon is an equally good equivalent. Another fine name would be ὁλκάς holkas “ship which is towed : hence, trading vessel, merchantman”.

Both ναῦς naus and πλοῖον ploion mean “ship”, however, the word naus is rare outside literary texts (Homer, Thucydides) and when both terms appear alongside each other and no adjectives are used, naus indicates a proper warship, ploion a merchantship or transport. (Again, see LSJ.)

So I'm curious how you came up with “naus emporia” and why you think it would be better?

For the Ptolemaic merchant ship, which has a different actor, a slender vessel, I would recommend the term φασήλιον phasēlion, a common Nile vessel.

Here are also two pages from L. Casson Ships and Seamanship in the Ancient World (Princeton 1971) in support: merchantmen.thumb.png.f16dbc701fb48ea2eae83e8b9a7a2a06.png

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to (conduct) trade=ΕΜΠΟΡΕΥΕΣΘΑΙ
trader=ΕΜΠΟΡΟΣ
trading-post/-town/-place=ΕΜΠΟΡΙΟΝ
trade-ware=ΦΟΡΤΟΣ ΕΜΠΟΡΙΚΟΣ / ΕΜΠΟΡΙΑ
trade-affairs=ΤΑ ΠΕΡΙ ΤΗΝ ΕΜΠΟΡΙΑΝ
trade-craft=ΕΜΠΟΡΙΚΗ ΤΕΧΝΗ
trade-ship/merchantman=ΝΑΥΣ ΕΜΠΟΡΙΑ - where I would correct myself to the better: ΝΑΥΣ ΕΜΠΟΡΙΚΗ

However also these variants could perhaps be fine, and are given by several of my dictionaries:
ΠΛΟΙΟΝ ΣΤΡΟΓΓΥΛΟΝ
ΝΑΥΣ ΦΟΡΤΑΓΩΓΟΣ


Essentially I would have no problem with any correction - do we have any generic "merchantman-term" used repeatedly in the same work, by some of our major classical or hellenistic authors? I say then we go with that term.

As for ΦΑΣΗΛΙΟΝ, sounds quite reasonable - Ptolemaic Egypt would however have needed and hence used plenty of sea-going merchantmen to cross indian and mediterranean open waters, for which those Nile vessels would hardly have been appropriate. Seems that the majority of seafaring in Egypt would have been on the Nile, so a bit of a tough choice.

Edited by Anaxandridas ho Skandiates

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36 minutes ago, Anaxandridas ho Skandiates said:

trade-ship/merchantman=ΝΑΥΣ ΕΜΠΟΡΙΑ - where I would correct myself to the better: ΝΑΥΣ ΕΜΠΟΡΙΚΗ

But is it actually attested? If so, where?

36 minutes ago, Anaxandridas ho Skandiates said:

several of my dictionaries

Plural? Anything wrong with the LSJ?

37 minutes ago, Anaxandridas ho Skandiates said:

ΠΛΟΙΟΝ ΣΤΡΟΓΓΥΛΟΝ
ΝΑΥΣ ΦΟΡΤΑΓΩΓΟΣ


Essentially I would have no problem with any correction - do we have any generic "merchantman-term" used repeatedly in the same work, by some of our major classical or hellenistic authors? I say then we go with that term.

There is e.g. Xenophon Hellenica 5.1.21:

ἔπλει μὲν δὴ ταῦτα διανοηθείς· ἐπειδὴ δὲ ἀπεῖχε πέντε ἢ ἓξ στάδια τοῦ λιμένος, ἡσυχίαν εἶχε καὶ ἀνέπαυεν. ὡς δὲ ἡμέρα ὑπέφαινεν, ἡγεῖτο: οἱ δὲ ἐπηκολούθουν. καὶ καταδύειν μὲν οὐδὲν εἴα στρογγύλον πλοῖον οὐδὲ λυμαίνεσθαι ταῖς ἑαυτῶν ναυσίν: εἰ δέ που τριήρη ἴδοιεν ὁρμοῦσαν, ταύτην πειρᾶσθαι ἄπλουν ποιεῖν, τὰ δὲ φορτηγικὰ πλοῖα καὶ γέμοντα ἀναδουμένους ἄγειν ἔξω, ἐκ δὲ τῶν μειζόνων ἐμβαίνοντας ὅπου δύναιντο τοὺς ἀνθρώπους λαμβάνειν. ἦσαν δέ τινες οἳ καὶ ἐκπηδήσαντες εἰς τὸ Δεῖγμα ἐμπόρους [passengers] τέ τινας καὶ ναυκλήρους [ship-owners] συναρπάσαντες εἰς τὰς ναῦς εἰσήνεγκαν.

Although I don't feel strongly about the particular phrase chosen, the current string (Ploîon Phortēgikón) is attested, therefore I don't really see a need to “correct” it into something else.

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I do seem to remember roughly what led me then to the other variant then - since it cannot be known exactly what kind of trading vessel is meant, I thought something more generic ("ship of commerce") would do best. That way whether the vessel was meant for coastal waters or the Nile or sea- or oceangoing trade, it was under all circumstances certainly a ship ΝΑΥΣ, of commerce ΕΜΠΟΡΙΚΗ. I also found it in my Swedish and German dictionaries.

This was because the ancients when placing orders at a shipyard for a trading vessel would not have "selected from a menu" like in the game, but here we need to have ONE button, "trade ship unit", "cost XX". But a dictionary is no attestation, and you are right that we should strive to find something closer to a category instead of inventing our own vocabulary.

I kept finding ΠΛΟΙΟΝ ΣΤΡΟΓΓΥΛΟΝ - Arrian uses πλοῖον στρογγύλον repeatedly in several books of the Anabasis, also as a category in contrast to vessels of war:

καὶ διέβησαν τριήρεσι μὲν ἑκατὸν καὶ ἑξήκοντα, πλοίοις δὲ ἄλλοις πολλοῖς στρογγύλοις (book I)

τὰ μὲν δὴ στρογγύλα πλοῖα ὅσα καὶ ἔτυχεν αὐτῶν περιστραφέντα πρὸς τοῦ ῥοῦ, (book VI)

ἐν τούτῳ δὲ ἄλλαι τε προσγίγνονται Ἀλεξάνδρῳ τριακόντοροι καὶ πλοῖα στρογγύλα (book VI)

also Demosthenes uses it contrasted with narrower war vessels in his speech against Leptines:

οὐδέ γ᾽  νῦν ὢν Διονύσιος ἤλπισεν ἄν ποτ᾽ ἴσως πλοίῳ στρογγύλῳ καὶ στρατιώταις ὀλίγοις Δίων᾽ ἐλθόντ᾽ ἐφ᾽ αὑτὸν ἐκβαλεῖν τὸν τριήρεις πολλὰς καὶ ξένους καὶ πόλεις κεκτημένον.

I am thankful for this correction, and suggest based on Xenophon, Thukydides, Demosthenes, Herodotos and Arrianos:

 

Ploion Stronggylon ΠΛΟΙΟΝ ΣΤΡΟΓΓΥΛΟΝ

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On 1/6/2020 at 1:01 PM, Nescio said:

Furthermore, it would be nice if you could have a critical look at the specific names used by the Celtic units, if you've not done so already somewhere, to have no obvious mistakes in the specific names when A24 will be released. Latin and Persian specific names were checked a couple of monts ago and I assume @Sundiata did that for the Kushites (though we still need to find people for the languages used by Carthaginians, Iberians, and Mauryas).

Basically the huge majority should be changed, the current names for the Celtic units are mostly based on modern Celtic languages (for example modern Welsh).

I made a list of names from my various proposals based on ancient Gaulish or old Celtic languages. Here a summary:

  • Cingetos. Designate a member of the warrior class, litt. "those-who-walk-in-front". 
  • Catucos. Meaning combatant, from the root Catu-, fight. 
  • Batoros. Meaning "who-hit-hard" or "who-knocks", a fighter.
  • Ambactos. Meaning "who-is-around", a satellite companion, a client or a servant. Not necessarily a low status since the word evolved in ambassador.
  • Eporedos. Meaning a cavalryman or a knight. High-member of the warrior-class.
  • Epossos. Meaning a cavalryman or a knight. High-member of the warrior-class.
  • Marcacos. Meaning a cavalryman. The word Marcos is a synonym of Epos for the horse but could be used for a different type.
  • Bagauda. Meaning combatant or bellicose, associated with rural revolts and brigands during the Roman Empire.
  • Selgos. Meaning hunter.
  • Telmiuicos. Meaning slinger from a reconstruction based on Telmi- for the sling and Uicos for victorious, which gives litt. "victorious-by-the-sling".
  • Talmoris. From the Old Breton Talmorion equivalent of the Latin funditoribus, a dative plural word for Slinger.
  • Bariogaisatos. Meaning "furious spearman", from the word Bario- (angry, furor) and the word Gaisa- (spear).
  • Adretos. Meaning "who-runs-fast", an attacker.
  • Comaterecos. Meaning patrician or senator.
  • Agrocuna. Meaning war-dog or battle-dog. From Agro- (battle) in Gaulish and Cuna (Dog) in Primitive Irish.
  • Epouanos. Meaning litt. "horse-killer". 
  • Soliduros. Attested word for the bodyguard of the Sotiates' King.
  • Adscoros. Meaning attendant or retainer.
  • Uerouicos. Meaning victorious warrior, great fighter, litt. "very-victorious". 
  • Uassos. Meaning servant or serf. 
  • Talanos. Meaning support or supportive person.
  • Excingos. A attacker or a warrior, litt. "who-get-out-to-fight".
  • Namantobogios. Meaning "smasher of enemies".
  • Essedon. Attested word for the chariot in general. Used in the context of war chariot by the Romans.
  • Argos. Meaning champion or noble.
  • Caur. Old Irish for champion, same logic than in the Gaulish Cauaros, another word for champion.

Changelog for the current rosters.

[file name] ; [specific name i.e. native language] ; [generic name i.e. English equivalent in game] ; [literal meaning for future reference] ; [used language]

brit_catafalque.xml ; Cassiuellaunos ; Catafalque ; Passionated Leader ; Gaulish
brit_cavalry_javelinist_b.xml ; Marcacos ; Raiding Cavalry ; Horseman ; Gaulish
brit_cavalry_swordsman_b.xml ; Eporedos ; Celtic Cavalry ; Cavalryman ; Gaulish
brit_champion_cavalry.xml ; Essedon ; Celtic Chariot ; Chariot ; Gaulish
brit_champion_infantry.xml ; Argos ; Celtic Champion ; Champion ; Gaulish
brit_hero_boudicca.xml ; Boudica ; Hero Charioteer ; Victorious ; Gaulish
brit_hero_caratacos.xml ; Caratacos ; Hero Swordsman ; Beloved ; Gaulish
brit_hero_cunobelin.xml ; Cunobelinos ; Hero Cavalry Swordsman ; Strong as a Dog ; Gaulish
brit_infantry_javelinist_b.xml ; Adretos ; Skirmisher ; Who-runs-fast ; Gaulish
brit_infantry_slinger_b.xml ; Talmoris ; Celtic Slinger ; Slinger ; Old Breton
brit_infantry_spearman_b.xml ; Catucos ; Celtic Spearman ; Combatant ; Gaulish
brit_ship_fishing.xml ; Longos ; Fishing Boat ; Long Boat ; Gaulish
brit_ship_merchant.xml ; Nauson ; Merchantman ; Ship ;  Gaulish
brit_ship_trireme.xml ; Pontos ; Medium Warship ; Ship ; Gaulish
brit_siege_ram.xml ; Molton ; Battering Ram ; Ram ; Gaulish
brit_support_female_citizen.xml ; Bena ; Celtic Woman ; Woman ; Gaulish
brit_support_healer_b.xml ; Druid ; Healer ; Wise ; Gaulish
brit_support_trader.xml ; Uogition ; Trader ; Carrier ; Gaulish
brit_war_dog_b.xml ; Agrocuna ; War Dog ; Battle Dog ; Archaic Irish

gaul_catafalque.xml ; Ambiorix ; Catafalque ; King in All Directions ; Gaulish
gaul_cavalry_javelinist_b.xml ; Marcacos ; Raiding Cavalry ; Horseman ; Gaulish
gaul_cavalry_swordsman_b.xml ; Eporedos ; Celtic Cavalry ; Cavalryman ; Gaulish
gaul_champion_cavalry.xml ; Uerouicos ; Gallic Noble Cavalry ; Victorious Warrior ; Gaulish
gaul_champion_fanatic.xml ; Bariogaisatos ; Naked Fanatic ; Furious Spearman ; Gaulish
gaul_champion_infantry.xml ; Soliduros ; Celtic Champion ; Champion ; Gaulish
gaul_hero_brennus.xml ; Brennos ; Hero Swordsman ; Commander ; Gaulish
gaul_hero_vercingetorix.xml ; Uercingetorix ; Hero Cavalry Swordsman ; King of the Great Warriors ; Gaulish
gaul_hero_viridomarus.xml ; Britomaros ; Hero Spearman ; With Great Discernment ; Gaulish
gaul_infantry_javelinist_b.xml ; Adretos ; Skirmisher ; Who-runs-fast ; Gaulish
gaul_infantry_slinger_b.xml ; Talmoris ; Celtic Slinger ; Slinger ; Old Breton
gaul_infantry_spearman_b.xml ; Catucos ; Celtic Spearman ; Combatant ; Gaulish
gaul_ship_fishing.xml ; Longos ; Fishing Boat ; Boat ; Gaulish
gaul_ship_merchant.xml ; Nauson ; Merchantman ; Ship ;  Gaulish
gaul_ship_trireme.xml ; Pontos ; Medium Warship ; Ship ; Gaulish
gaul_siege_ram.xml ; Molton ; Battering Ram ; Ram ; Gaulish
gaul_support_female_citizen.xml ; Bena ; Celtic Woman ; Woman ; Gaulish
gaul_support_healer_b.xml ; Druid ; Healer ; Wise ; Gaulish
gaul_support_trader.xml ; Uogition ; Trader ; Carrier ; Gaulish

Edited by Genava55
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52 minutes ago, Genava55 said:

Basically the huge majority should be changed

Great!

Currently the Britons have the following unit roster:

Spoiler

brit_catafalque.xml
brit_cavalry_javelinist_b.xml
brit_cavalry_swordsman_b.xml
brit_champion_cavalry.xml [chariot javelineer]
brit_champion_infantry.xml [swordsman]
brit_hero_boudicca.xml
brit_hero_caratacos.xml
brit_hero_cunobelin.xml
brit_infantry_javelinist_b.xml
brit_infantry_slinger_b.xml
brit_infantry_spearman_b.xml
brit_ship_fishing.xml
brit_ship_merchant.xml
brit_ship_trireme.xml
brit_siege_ram.xml
brit_support_female_citizen.xml
brit_support_healer_b.xml
brit_support_trader.xml
brit_war_dog_b.xml

And the Gauls have:

Spoiler

gaul_catafalque.xml
gaul_cavalry_javelinist_b.xml
gaul_cavalry_swordsman_b.xml
gaul_champion_cavalry.xml [spearman]
gaul_champion_fanatic.xml [spearman]
gaul_champion_infantry.xml [swordsman]
gaul_hero_brennus.xml
gaul_hero_vercingetorix.xml
gaul_hero_viridomarus.xml
gaul_infantry_javelinist_b.xml
gaul_infantry_slinger_b.xml
gaul_infantry_spearman_b.xml
gaul_ship_fishing.xml
gaul_ship_merchant.xml
gaul_ship_trireme.xml
gaul_siege_ram.xml
gaul_support_female_citizen.xml
gaul_support_healer_b.xml
gaul_support_trader.xml

Those are the files that have specific names. Could you list your recommendations as follows?

[file name] ; [specific name i.e. native language] ; [generic name i.e. English equivalent in game] ; [literal meaning for future reference] ; [used language]

That would make it much easier to propose, check, and review a patch.

@Stan`, could you merge this specific name discussion (starting with https://wildfiregames.com/forum/index.php?/topic/25184-task-current-issues-with-celtic-units-and-guideline-for-the-next/page/6/&tab=comments#comment-390752 ) into the proper thread (https://wildfiregames.com/forum/index.php?/topic/25284-specific-name-review-units/), so it would be easier to find back in the future?

 

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7 hours ago, Genava55 said:

Done. I edited my previous message.

Thanks, I appreciate it! Vowel length does not matter? Also, do the Britons use Gaulish because the Brythonic language too obscure?

Those brackets were unnecessary. Also, for the generic name, it doesn't matter what's currently displayed in game, it matters what is the best English equivalent, so feel free to suggest other strings.

Anyway, there is a patch now: D2641

Also, specific names for an infantry swordsman and archer would be nice to have, in case they'll be added to the Gaul roster.

On 2/18/2020 at 4:11 PM, Genava55 said:

[brit_ship_fishing.xml] ; [Longos] ; [Fishing Boat] ; [Long Boat] ; [Gaulish]

In many languages “long ship” means a warship.

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