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Lion.Kanzen

===[TASK]=== African minifaction buildings

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2 hours ago, wowgetoffyourcellphone said:

An easy thing to do right now would be to parse and piece out some assets from the Nuba village model for Atlas/scenarios/skirmish maps. 

nubastuff.jpg

it would be need more relevant, (may be shield) props, actually it look like generic to me.

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Oooh, @Victor Rossi is one amazing artist!

Dahomean storyteller:

victor-rossi-dahomean1.thumb.jpg.4111f19546cc42e20fee77d7795f22b4.jpg

https://www.artstation.com/artwork/k426ll

Dahomey was a relatively small, yet powerful militaristic kingdom on the West African coast centred on modern day Togo, sandwiched between the Ashanti and Oyo Empires. It was ruled from Abomey, between 1600 and 1894, and they were probably most known for the Dahomey Amazons (the Ahosi or the Mino), an elite force of several thousand women with a ferocious reputation, fighting as a royal guard, as well as well as separate wings (left and right) embedded in the main army. They actually participated in some major battles like the battle of Atakpame. 

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The Nuba Village: African Mini Faction, concept art

Nuba village Sundiata concept art copy.jpg

Some concept art made by me (getting carried away again), inspired by Stanislas' Nuba merc camp, and using his texture for the huts. Generic African warrior dude was a free 3D printable model that I imported into Blender (https://free3d.com/3d-model/african-tribal-warriorsknobkerrie-club-v3--170705.html).  

Edited by Sundiata
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On 3/2/2019 at 1:18 PM, Sundiata said:

Some concept art made by me (getting carried away again), inspired by Stanislas' Nuba merc camp, and using his texture for the huts. Generic African warrior dude was a free 3D printable model that I imported into Blender (https://free3d.com/3d-model/african-tribal-warriorsknobkerrie-club-v3--170705.html).  

how many African peoples (diversity) live in this timeframe?

 

VPmPhoSr.jpg

Edited by Lion.Kanzen

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12 hours ago, Lion.Kanzen said:

how many African peoples (diversity) live in this timeframe?

A lot... The problem is reference-ability. Most of Saharan and Sub-Saharan African history from Antiquity, especially in the BC period, is steeped in obscurity. Literate and urbanized civilizations are also rare in this period. The major literate and urbanized civilizations of the period are the Kushites, the Habesha (D'mt, proto-Aksumites and the Aksumites) and the Garamantes. But I'm sure you know about them by now :P  Kushites are more or less done (just details now). The Habesha/Early Aksumites and Garamantes are almost doable as fully fledged civs, from a reference point of view... Almost...

Other really interesting cultures from 0AD's timeframe (but not doable for lack of references) include the Nok, the Sao, Djenne and Tichit, as well as the ancient Somali coast and proto Swahili stuff on the East African coast, but even less is known about those last two... What we do know is that the Indian Ocean Trade dates to the first millennium BC era, with a Southern terminus at the Sub-equatorial city of Rhapta (in modern day Tanzania). Other important East African coastal towns or cities involved in the trade since the BC era include Nicon and Sarapion (Kenya), and Opone and Pano (Somalia) and are described in the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea.

About the Nok, the Sao, Djenne and Tichit:

The Nok Culture, one of my favourites! Located in Central and Northern Nigeria, flourished from c. 1500 BC to c. 500 AD, with a climax during the last few centuries of the 1st Millennium BC. They fit our timeframe perfectly. There is an enormous corpus of exquisite Nok terracotta figurines depicting people and other more anthropomorphic figures. They were smelting iron by the 6th century BC, perhaps even earlier. They farmed pearl millet and cowpeas. The soil in Nok sites is typically very acidic leaving hardly any organic remains, and most of the archaeological sites have been looted into oblivion to supply the international art market with African antiquities (Nok terracottas among the most sought after), and thus, their archaeological context is often obliterated. I assume a lot of vernacular architecture, but they did build stone based round huts and used stone in wall contrustion as well. Other than that, I can't say much about them. Their art was very clearly ancestral to the much more developed medieval brass casting in Ife (Southern Nigeria), which produced some of the finest examples of naturalistic art in Africa, and the world (see my profile pic). The Benin bronzes are a later more stylized example of the enduring legacy of Nok art in later Nigeria. The Nok influenced artistic developments across West Africa, and may have played a role in the dissemination of iron smelting technology to other parts of West Africa. 

Anyway, enjoy this lovely collection of Nok terracottas, virtually all from the 500BC to 1AD timeframe. They're so expressive... I can't get enough of them, lol...

Spoiler

16f3020e53fdac138796b5fd59a77a57--africa-art-d-art.thumb.jpg.c1fbe9395a54ac0fb488b7fd294ed854.jpgbulletin2011_spread03.thumb.jpg.9aaaee9d3ad6114e9d4e635878025a72.jpgAP1996_03_MAIN.thumb.jpg.e36a0c7924ded18bd1a3aea579321c28.jpg1904d298-626e-45ee-95ee-ccfe32f3a71e.jpg.ef00778f91f0f09fa94c243120be655a.jpg

64.thumb.jpg.7369f0981d6dab0304a0d3c55048686a.jpg64_1.thumb.jpg.20496ed71c298a6e55d24246a8093dd2.jpg

hez-2569589.thumb.jpg.c29da25cf9d4503fffdfeaab665c13d1.jpghez-2569722.thumb.jpg.56c93ae37a49c2ac12a73bc4f12ac862.jpg

bust-of-woman-priestess-nobility-or-divine-ancestor-5th-century-nok-FB70Y6.thumb.jpg.7d18af2abd66c5fbf27434aa41967f51.jpg1190703006_AmuletstatuetteNokNigeriaTerracotta2350BPh.5_5in.jpg.976e40a7d2e444d9be18e5e6e0a0b1f2.jpg1853086414_StatueonbendedkneewithElephantandFeline.jpg.aa1722a2ee8f755c6e44e931abeefb85.jpgNok-Nigeria-musee-du-Quai-Branly-Paris.jpg.6e8a827e4ea0fe7c835138b67088f5bb.jpg757d34ca3fb8b2edf30d3c301a7ec010.thumb.jpg.3b6ac8bcde92a7b326a3d7bba993abe7.jpgh2_nok_1-1.thumb.jpg.f1505be69943b9cf26d11788dcce63bf.jpgimage.thumb.jpg.e215ce78c7a337cc563f5d62557fc710.jpgd0f910f242b7737d360dd5621fb2859a.jpg.23ad7d533ff89045dbf17f28141efc16.jpgNok-Terracotta-Head-quai-Branly-Barbier-Mueller.thumb.png.2ae6798e3d0975a108a3b55a88a25d2c.png8f2c6074-2a2c-45dd-8b7a-e50284fc5735.jpg.8be2563b159bac4c15e045e5873eeb73.jpglf.jpeg.b45eb853fb42a81a3bc70a956ea4bc84.jpeg5244b488ab2e55511bfd79f854119429.thumb.jpg.393b58066086f3e4380b87aa2a3fae86.jpgnok-terra-cotta-04-large.jpg.b00d05dd277e4f4cbacaf0330edf1dbb.jpg69a4721d540c10b10c3731bf3dc6264b.thumb.jpg.a5aed9ab565a73dfd7c7e073234d7ec5.jpg984ab687d87e2a2b32782bb4d77ffe16--hairstyle-braid-african-history.jpg.1553faca7cf2da69bc895728a4d688aa.jpgNok-sculpture-Head-Terracotta-first-millennium-BC.jpg.19b3a04f18e36e1e53f3edcdf73ad89c.jpg1904d298-626e-45ee-95ee-ccfe32f3a71e.jpg.ef00778f91f0f09fa94c243120be655a.jpgb65e0b51ae8f7b10620682ac3eeb166c_f324.thumb.jpg.eac67ff9812f25e41b4b6e9ce80ab3a8.jpg25.AM__0425.-1300dpi.thumb.jpg.9f52001471071974ee9b322b450e61c5.jpg25.AM__0425.-2300dpi.thumb.jpg.937f0c09890baeac0c42827cde0bc134.jpgl_statue-nok-terre-cuite-art-africain-060713-00058.thumb.jpg.b3ba159200a1f7afc6c561298381069d.jpgafrican-arte.com-IMG_2157.thumb.jpg.3c71207dee281b590554d25141521549.jpgafrican-arte.com-IMG_2154.thumb.jpg.5896af7a9571abbac60c757174543cca.jpg9608231_master.thumb.jpg.ed693cba0176ba4a2cffc78916ff0a38.jpg9222891_master.thumb.jpeg.59a6ef3a7cb944dc05c1072854c8fc5d.jpegNok_sculpture_small-5895bb0a3df78caebca4730a.thumb.jpg.9e4f573f07eb5136f9e53d8edc8375e4.jpgFOTO-1-7.thumb.jpg.a514065aa47d9b4770b1c97c13e345f2.jpgbf7229b2e985f3d38c05ea148deba7c7.jpg.dfc9bab523cfa93aa503d35c971edeff.jpg77e7cf9eef31ca692978f41c9005e2e7.jpg.03b2f8facff2c2e62359963924f6df32.jpgab5d45597d9a4868134d6cf129793eb5--siamese-african-art.jpg.9b71f7a3bea723175d0e3a502a29f824.jpg97d53d30986f5af15c2b2e8e591245b2--terra-pots.jpg.6f380546776cbf1e988a3454f8bca2c5.jpg30366_2599542.thumb.jpg.38c84d651e0e6a21d1a81a150bafcf7b.jpg

 

the Sao civilization (as early as the 6th century BC) in Chad, Lake Chad region, which had urban or proto urban centres and a very long lasting culture. They form a sort of geographical link between the southern Nile Valley and the "Western Sudan" (West Africa). There is tantalizingly little information available about them. They're probably somewhat ancestral to the Kanem Bornu Empire, as well as other more recent populations of the region, but the relation is unclear. I've only seen some nice pottery and a few hideously ugly terracotta figurines from them. These terracotta figurines are similar to the equally ugly terracotta's of Koma Land in Northern Ghana, perhaps belonging to or related to Kintampo Culture, and they are also similar to the much more artistic terracottas of ancient Djenne (an ancient city on the Niger river in modern day Mali). A joint Roman Garamantian commercial expedition actually reached lake Chad after crossing the desert and found a land they referred to Agisymba. Perhaps referring to the ancient Sao? The Garamantian King actually claimed that the people of Agisymba were his subjects, although that seems a little unlikely, given the distance between the two countries... 

Spoiler

Sao civilization terracotta (Chad 6th century BC - 16th century AD):

Anthromorphic-clay-figurines.jpg.8a5e1d79fdc945480108b15686e744bd.jpg

 

Koma Land (Northern Ghana), terracotta, 7th century AD:

ghana-figurine.jpg.5b24ec8e4230aaed77704c02b35096d2.jpgarticle-2478873-190DFF6400000578-783_306x423.jpg.23fa25ae03dfb7344d748d99d951a4ba.jpg

58873b2bc56f1.thumb.jpg.27fa0cec763d3ba749971da3b05ca5d8.jpg

Am I just seeing things or do those terracottas look really similar??

 

Djenné-Djenno 

Quote

"(also Jenne-Jeno; /ˈdʒɛniː dʒʌˌnoʊ/) is a UNESCO World Heritage Site located in the Niger River Valley in the country of Mali. Literally translated to "ancient Djenné", it is the original site of both Djenné and Mali and is considered to be among the oldest urbanized centers and the best-known archaeology site in sub-Saharan Africa.[2][3] This archaeological site is located about 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) away from the modern town, and is believed to have been involved in long distance trade and possibly the domestication of African rice.[3] The site is believed to exceed 33 hectares (82 acres); however this is yet to be confirmed with extensive survey work.[3] With the help of archaeological excavations mainly by Susan and Roderick McIntosh, the site is known to have been occupied from 250 B.C. to 900 A.D. The city is believed to have been abandoned and moved where the current city is located due to the spread of Islam and the building of the Great Mosque of Djenné"

The Garamantes actually sent (trade?) expeditions to Djenne, and later even guided a Roman expedition to the area... They described a city of small black people in a large river bend... And Roman trade goods were actually found at the site! It probably wouldn't have been the most impressive sight in 0AD's timeframe though. Djenne steadily develops primarily in the AD period. 

 

Djenne terracotta and other stuff:

Spoiler

image.jpg.01ce5c2145db758557f176d4933f1a2b.jpg1161073116_Statuette_fminine-Rgion_de_Djenn-Mali.thumb.jpg.76bf73d3402e70210507950b3089bc20.jpg663644249_SoldiersMaliDjenne.thumb.jpg.774ab2bdca2a9f8bb13c3e4376887285.jpg637e80d386c9231ff16bd93e084c50e8--africa-art-bongo.jpg.7795496a677de0946e026f3151af0d1c.jpgCbMKtk4UkAAeEH4.jpg.a758a5ddcdf0e27f1d06c979c2461ede.jpg15ffe7a0-e3b8-4e95-b80c-390052219f62-large.thumb.jpeg.967c6df12ba5fdf32853de837d7366db.jpeg1544435653261_2094554_origin.jpg.8ebe7c80414823f061b74f1e9e60b80d.jpgmother_with_.thumb.jpg.4720ea2818401250c97b1e5b1d4fd509.jpgDjenne-terracotta-couple-P0049_1.thumb.jpg.636fa52766f3178578dcd3a88662d21b.jpg56054fb34ca1bdff0abf0324dbfdfefb.jpg.ff3ebe8dd3c9cfe80bef308b252dabaa.jpg50826305_375715813249128_1755250286808670223_n.thumb.jpg.6084623c9de18827a8ffb13a3ab33b5f.jpga-terracotta-figure-of-a-man-excavated-in-the-djennemopti-area-DE2AYT.thumb.jpg.d6918974d8fb548d0ab7929100412fcc.jpg57a84ed1d020dda90fa478e3b12fd5c4.thumb.jpg.366a4bda676e91b45657e1afba8d32c6.jpg615f51b7-c48b-4b05-b108-414bd6813696.jpg.822f1296dde07eb518c3495db87fbac6.jpg59192141_1_x.jpg.ad9d6ff998d3fc3ef7087aec73ce524f.jpg0d2b86b1d2801ce32e1ab997475293ad.jpg.646db2526a825a1ec99b07147cab4979.jpg103017-15-Art-History.thumb.jpg.cb72264b924ce0e6ba734261fb51ebcd.jpg86_119.thumb.jpg.304918af2a177605b6e06cbd516c46d3.jpg

 

480703094_olddjennejenne-jeno_excavation-157CEE0B7DA3D043961copy.thumb.jpg.d5ddd3f41163841e0baa1c9b7e793a32.jpg

 

Medieval Djenne in 1000AD

309725626_JennoJenoDjenneMaliAncientAfricancity1000AD.thumb.jpg.d88fde46853e547c63b6d81c8dd7f814.jpg

 

 

From the mid to late medieval period onward, the typical Sudano Sahelian architectures became dominant in the new Islamic Djenne:

1318805387_Djenn-Le_Dispensaire_(AOF).thumb.jpg.d76f7e95fd2e9b1dab8c189fc3af189c.jpgindex-11.jpg.86c9be5eee4f8084b5b89dd9fd2717b0.jpgindex-15.jpg.6e81cb89838924cbb0ddf32a45f88b90.jpg

 

Djenne today

Dry season:

Corbis-YA018462.jpg.e577608d7605c7db993965e35da09dd0.jpg

Wet season:

gettyimages-73107869-1024x1024.thumb.jpg.460c8df75ab042879a560bcf4da1103a.jpg

 

The Great mosque of Djenne, one of the most marvelous examples of the Sudano Sahelian mud brick architecture... It was rebuilt in the 19th century after falling in disrepair, but the original mosque of a comparable size is believed to date to the 12th century. 

gettyimages-539068512-1024x1024.thumb.jpg.c546c545b23d128267d695368d435299.jpgmali-travel-guide.thumb.jpg.6a28330c7d88b253a54e776011ebe77f.jpg

 

Dhar Tichitt

Quote

Dhar Tichitt is a Neolithic archaeological site located in the southwestern region of the Sahara Desert, in Mauritania. It is one of several settlement locations along the sandstone cliffs in the area. The cliffs were inhabited by pastoralists starting at around 4000 BP and lasted to around 2300 BP before present (BP).[1] This area is one of the oldest known archaeological occupation sites in the western part of Africa. About 500 stone settlements littered the region in the former savannah of the Sahara. In addition to herding livestock, its inhabitants fished and grew millet.

The Dhar Tichitt site had become a complex culture by 3600 BP and had architectural and material culture elements that seemed to match the site at Koumbi Saleh. In more recent work in Dhar Tichitt, and then in Dhar Nema and Dhar Walata, it has become more and more clear that as the desert advanced, the Dhar Tichitt culture (which had abandoned its earliest site around 2300 BP, possibly because of pressure from desert nomads, but also because of increasing aridity) and moved southward into the still well-watered areas of northern Mali.

The Neolithic site of Dhar Tichitt in this area was settled by agropastoral communities around 2000 BC.[2] Their settlements were generally situated on the cliffs and included stone building. These are the oldest surviving archaeological settlements in West Africa and the oldest of all stone base settlements south of the Sahara. They are thought to have been built by the Soninke people and were possibly the precursor of the Ghana empire.[3][4][5] The area was abandoned around 500 BC probably because of the onset of more arid conditions. Hundreds of rock art images have been discovered, depicting various animals and hunting scenes.[6] Archaeologists including P.J. Munson, Augustin F.C. Holl, and S. Amblard have found some evidence that millet was farmed seasonally as early as 2000 BC.

Essentially proto-Wagadu (Ancient Ghana) They're ancestral to the Soninke/Mande people who eventually founded the medieval Ghana Empire in modern day Mali, after being forced South by the encroaching Sahara as well as raiding desert nomads. 

Tichitt ruins:

Spoiler

o6fg35.jpg.bcf0e45eb1179b420cab80f23f7ef8ba.jpg23w6woy.jpg.50b49557154e8ed8deba8be940d367e3.jpg0fd81653.jpg.dd18041e28d4224ffb865a45829ed263.jpgimg-3.jpg.092007331ada9b63bcbe809b91ab6bd6.jpg1187369594_DharTichitt.thumb.png.1d76b5e675bfd13263a0922d3e74ccbc.png

 

 

Antiquity in Africa is really difficult to research... But from the medieval period onwards state formation in Africa shifts gears and there is an explosion in centralized and militarized Kingdoms and Empires with increased urbanism, spread of Islam and thus writing and interesting developments in art and architecture as well.  

Welcome back, by the way, @Lion.Kanzen, you've been missed :) 

Edited by Sundiata
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Also, if someone by any chance has access to this book about the Garamantes, that would be fantastic!

Mario Liverani (ed.). Aghram Nadharif: The Barkat Oasis (Sha 'Abiya of Ghat, Libyan Sahara) in Garamantian Times (The Archaeology of Libyan Sahara Volume 2; Arid Zone Archaeology Monograph 5). xxxii+520 pages, 302 illustrations, 196 tables, 16 colour plates. 2005. Firenze: All'Insegna del Giglio; 88-7814-471-1 paperback.

1900610085_GaramantesAghramNadharif.thumb.jpg.1f60c5cdaefa1e9435bd1e1b02804726.jpg

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/276255156_Mario_Liverani_ed_Aghram_Nadharif_The_Barkat_Oasis_Sha_'Abiya_of_Ghat_Libyan_Sahara_in_Garamantian_Times_The_Archaeology_of_Libyan_Sahara_Volume_2_Arid_Zone_Archaeology_Monograph_5_xxxii520_pages_302_

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Quote

The Nuba Village: African Mini Faction, concept art

My very first random map was supposed to do something related to African mini factions. Most specifically, the Kalahari and the numerous tribes of people inhabiting the area. It was an attempt at allowing players to interact with these NPC tribes in various forms. (Diplomacy of some sort IIRC). Unfortunately, there wasn't much to work with. Closest being the Kushite art which does not resemble these buildings at all. If these models were present back then, that map might be feasible.

But as mentioned before, it just wasn't feasible back then and the map was scrapped in favor of something Kushite related which ended up being fields of meroe. A far cry from the original design but I did put some Kushite NPC just to achieve at least a part of the original map idea.

The red desert would have been a nice addition to a collection of mostly identical maps.

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5 minutes ago, (-_-) said:

My very first random map was supposed to do something related to African mini factions. Most specifically, the Kalahari and the numerous tribes of people inhabiting the area. It was an attempt at allowing players to interact with these NPC tribes in various forms. (Diplomacy of some sort IIRC). Unfortunately, there wasn't much to work with. Closest being the Kushite art which does not resemble these buildings at all. If these models were present back then, that map might be feasible.

But as mentioned before, it just wasn't feasible back then and the map was scrapped in favor of something Kushite related which ended up being fields of meroe. A far cry from the original design but I did put some Kushite NPC just to achieve at least a part of the original map idea.

The red desert would have been a nice addition to a collection of mostly identical maps.

How about a random map like this? In DE I call it "Nubian Frontier".

nubian_frontier.thumb.jpg.9fb7355b044dfc81f9cd2730fd902c8d.jpgnubian_frontier2.thumb.jpg.a78800964ffd78bf356df1dfab905b3f.jpgnubian_frontier3.thumb.jpg.2fe27a19f39229fce15dd49eb764d07d.jpg

Edited by wowgetoffyourcellphone
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35 minutes ago, wowgetoffyourcellphone said:

How about a random map like this? In DE I call it "Nubian Frontier".

Looks nice. Those markets remind me of AoE3's trade line. Won't be *that* hard to add a similar NPC invincible trader going down the road, dropping off treasure at the markets. Only issue is players building stuff on the route. (arguably, that is better).

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1 hour ago, (-_-) said:

My very first random map was supposed to do something related to African mini factions. Most specifically, the Kalahari and the numerous tribes of people inhabiting the area. It was an attempt at allowing players to interact with these NPC tribes in various forms. (Diplomacy of some sort IIRC). Unfortunately, there wasn't much to work with. Closest being the Kushite art which does not resemble these buildings at all. If these models were present back then, that map might be feasible.

But as mentioned before, it just wasn't feasible back then and the map was scrapped in favor of something Kushite related which ended up being fields of meroe. A far cry from the original design but I did put some Kushite NPC just to achieve at least a part of the original map idea.

The red desert would have been a nice addition to a collection of mostly identical maps.

Fields of Meroë is really nice... So is "Nubian frontier". These Nuba huts will become available before the next alpha, so you could still add a Nuba village on the West Bank of the Nile (hopefully with a nice herd of Sanga cattle that can be raided). Perhaps conquering the Nuba "CC" could allow the training of Nuba mercs for non-Kush players as well. 

 

34 minutes ago, (-_-) said:

Looks nice. Those markets remind me of AoE3's trade line. Won't be *that* hard to add a similar NPC invincible trader going down the road, dropping off treasure at the markets. Only issue is players building stuff on the route. [non-issue]

+1000

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2 hours ago, (-_-) said:

Won't be *that* hard to add a similar NPC invincible trader going down the road, dropping off treasure at the markets.

Was not *that* hard at all. Might make a full map or something in the future.

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@Lion.Kanzen I made a rudimentary map of Africa, roughly from the 3rd century BC to 1st century BC-ish. It's a bit rough on the edges, forgive me :P but it will give you a better understanding than those random general maps that just omit everything. 

1899779949_Africaduring0ADstimeframe.thumb.jpg.393e7d59fd6b59596ad988803b64f59b.jpg

The spaces in between are probably occupied by low density hunter gatherers and even "troglodytes" (cave dwellers). There are probably other cultures that deserve mention on this map as well, but I'm not familiar enough with them. 

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On 4/11/2019 at 2:36 PM, Sundiata said:

Fields of Meroë is really nice... So is "Nubian frontier". These Nuba huts will become available before the next alpha, so you could still add a Nuba village on the West Bank of the Nile (hopefully with a nice herd of Sanga cattle that can be raided). Perhaps conquering the Nuba "CC" could allow the training of Nuba mercs for non-Kush players as well. 

 

How's it coming? :D 

 

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Sorry guys, I've had no time at all these past 2 weeks... Hopefully I'll have a little more time soon :) I really want to finish this, badly... 

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1 hour ago, (-_-) said:

@Sundiata something like this? (I seemed to have messed up some math.) I forgot to post this back then.

That's pretty darn cool...  Are you sure it's best to just spawn resources like that on arrival? Wouldn't it be better for the resource trickle to go directly to the player that controls the trade post. If nobody controls the trade post the camel just passes?

Anyway, really cool job! I'm sure @wowgetoffyourcellphone might be interested in implementing something like that on some of his new maps... 

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17 minutes ago, Sundiata said:

That's pretty darn cool...  Are you sure it's best to just spawn resources like that on arrival? Wouldn't it be better for the resource trickle to go directly to the player that controls the trade post. If nobody controls the trade post the camel just passes?

Anyway, really cool job! I'm sure @wowgetoffyourcellphone might be interested in implementing something like that on some of his new maps... 

we have silk road map. but i'm not sure where is.

 

 

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Not hard to add resource to the stockpile directly. I also need a new map to go along with it too. The video is of a modified syria (2) skirmish map.

The silk road map is on github.

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