Jump to content
Sundiata

The Kingdom of Kush: A proper introduction [Illustrated]

Recommended Posts

It would be really great if those three could be finished and subsequently included in A23. Having them in underused mods is nice and all, but they really deserve a much wider public.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always typing wrong. I was just only referring to kushites. I'm sure that I had a better level of English when I was in highschool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Nescio I agree with you that mods deserve a much wider public. This could be done by making it easier to install mods into the game. For example, by having mod manager which can download and install mods with a single click. However, I disagree with you about including all those civilizations into the main mod. Mods are a good way extend the main game or introduce completely new ideas. The [Pony Ascendant](http://www.moddb.com/mods/0-ad-ponies-ascendant) mod by LoordGood is a good example for such a mod.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, balduin said:

@Nescio I agree with you that mods deserve a much wider public. This could be done by making it easier to install mods into the game. For example, by having mod manager which can download and install mods with a single click. However, I disagree with you about including all those civilizations into the main mod. Mods are a good way extend the main game or introduce completely new ideas. The [Pony Ascendant](http://www.moddb.com/mods/0-ad-ponies-ascendant) mod by LoordGood is a good example for such a mod.

Granted, but I think the Han would be a great addition to the main game since they were such a huge faction in the time period. Smaller civs like Thebans, maybe leave for mods.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, wowgetoffyourcellphone said:

Granted, but I think the Han would be a great addition to the main game since they were such a huge faction in the time period. Smaller civs like Thebans, maybe leave for mods.

Also with the Han you potentially entice a bigger market for the game.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, balduin said:

Does anybody know how many mods are implementing the Kushites right now?

I'd say at least three. Hannibal's + 0adMods + DE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, balduin said:

@stanislas69 I am not sure if I understood your references:

Could you please clarify what you mean by 0adMods?

There is a kushites repository here -> https://github.com/0ADMods/kushites That's the most complete kushite mod yet, it has the latest features.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, stanislas69 said:

There is a kushites repository here -> https://github.com/0ADMods/kushites That's the most complete kushite mod yet, it has the latest features.

It's great to see everything Kushite is being concentrated in a single location! Also, one faction, one mod is helpful if it is decided to incorporate them into another mod (or 0 A.D.'s main distribution).

Is there also a Han repository? And another for the Xiongnu?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Nescio said:

Is there also a Han repository? And another for the Xiongnu?

That's included in the Terra Magna repository

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Kingdom of Kush, Random Things 

I still have a few random references that didn't fit well with the previous posts or were sourced after posting, but still deserve honourable mention:


 

Spoiler

 

Firstly, Nuba Wrestling: A suggestion for renaming the fortress tech: 

- "Will to Fight": inspire your troops with higher pay. All soldiers + 25% attack

becomes:

- "Nuba Wrestling": train your troops in the art of wrestling. All soldiers +25% attack

Spoiler

"Nuba fighting is done by the Nuba peoples in the Nuba Mountains of South Kordofan state, in northern Sudan. It involves both stick fighting and wrestling.

The goal of Nuba wrestling is to slam the opponent to the ground. Wrestling is relatively recreational, and serious injuries are rare.[contradictory]

Nuba wrestling has no pinning and no submissions. Although there are strikes, these are essentially part of the grappling; in other words, this is not a boxing system, as is, for example, Hausadambe. Therefore, Nuba wrestling is best viewed as a system of standing grappling, historically practiced naked, but in towns, today practiced in T-shirts and shorts.

Nuba stick fighting essentially mimics the movements of fighting with spear and shield. Little armor is worn, so injuries can be severe.

Training for both wrestling and stick fighting includes practicing under the supervision of former champions, performing athletic dances, learning traditional songs, and drinking lots of milk while avoiding promiscuity and beer."    -Wikipedia- 

"During the period of the New Kingdom (1550-1070 BC), additional Egyptian artwork (often on friezes), depicted Egyptian and Nubian wrestlers competing. Carroll notes striking similarities between these ancient depictions and those of the modern Nuba wrestlers.[12] On the 406 wrestling pairs found in the Middle Kingdom tombs at Beni Hasan in the Nile valley, nearly all of the techniques seen in modern freestyle wrestling could be found."   -Wikipedia- 

Ancient Egyptian depictions of "Nubian" and Egyptian wrestlers:

5a660c9335f83_WallpaintingsofwrestlersintombofSaqetIIItombsatBeniHassanMiddleEgyptEgypt.thumb.jpg.1698df492b6291b818c408a5c6bf4393.jpg

 

Contemporary Nuba:

5a660c84d7ea7_Nubianwrestlers1.thumb.jpg.0878d1937bbc95ba506ea8ed892a78d1.jpg

5a660c8ac6330_Nubianwrestlers2.thumb.jpg.bf4b6c0512b085d95b0b20f3d77dc637.jpg

 

 

The Royal palace at Wad Ben Naqa, with a concise explanation:

5a660e9a8aecc_KingdomofKushKushitepalaceatWadBenNaqaNagaplanmaplayout.thumb.jpg.00775163b05310519b54385ad33ec019.jpg

 

An actual dedicated storehouse from Sanam:

5a660d01dd480_SAK300Sanambuilding.thumb.jpeg.36f05b5b415bcf022341b93456cc1a37.jpeg

 

Mapped ruins on the northern part of the Royal City in Meroë:

6-6fc472a46c.thumb.jpg.9bd23041c0e785e7ee164779443a12e1.jpg

 

Ruins of Hamadab, outlines:

Hamadab.thumb.jpeg.accdedc7fa245283d9a3f569bd1853d8.jpeg

 

Hamadab reconstruction:

5a660d5ebe89b_KingdomofKushKushitetownofDomatelHamadabMeroiticperiodtempleandmultystorypalace3dreconstruction.thumb.jpg.f06f08ec4ea55b889f46cd7e32fe801e.jpg

 

 

Inside the massive temple of Taharqa in Kawa, during excavations. It was subsequently reburied under sand, where it still sits today. Only the top row of blocks are sometimes visible

5a660ddfcb1cc_KingdomofKushKushitetempleoftaharqaatkawainteriorduringexcavations.thumb.jpg.38c265ba04ede52608e08da5cc9477e9.jpg

 

The Amun temple in Naqa:

img-2.thumb.jpg.e97037fc286cd7ccda43e878530c94c9.jpg

img-3.thumb.jpg.7cb060a63286b1ee5565a3b5664e0c04.jpg

 

Other ruins in Naqa:

5a660f54c782b_NaqaRuins.thumb.jpg.6f40e50925179dcbc0428a52b08ee5a7.jpg

 

Naqa Lion statues:

Wildung_Naga_in_JPK_37.jpg.c0d4b6e51b5d6151fdd03d1980298623.jpg

5a6611d35a4ef_KingdomofKushKushitelionstatueNaqaWidder_Koenigsfigur_Lwe.thumb.jpg.cd05ddcfc37ca56d57e7926390911d74.jpg

 

A piece of fabric. Organic materials deteriorate much faster than inorganic materials, especially within the rain-belt in Sudan. Therefore wood, leather and fabrics are very rare finds..

5.2_c_fragment_de_linceul_peint_mei_roii_tique_v._francigny_a_c_sfdas-12cce.jpg.854d74e782ec58492ffcb274c20c39c5.jpg

 

Export of exotic animals from Kush to Egypt, including a lion, an elephant, an antelope and a giraffe, as well as cattle:

Beit_el_Wali_Nubians.jpg.710f564af07d608f1445e959cad3e224.jpg

0e8259fa42829f03254d9330e3a68ee7.thumb.jpg.bcc908ee307b364501bd70baed68193f.jpg

 

A clear depiction that the composite bow was also used. These lions are a real nuisance to the enemies of Kush:

N48AGJZ.thumb.png.f22ddd5e5fb7f6910838f4f045d24582.png

 

Egyptian carving of a Kushite captive:

d4c819d8cd2d8199d3fe74173a5497ea.jpg.41f67231d639def5e8e76d1b6d51dd20.jpg

 

Stele of Amanishakheto:

Stele_Amanishakheto1.thumb.jpg.f3b9b576c92ef1cba51af157aa25d532.jpg

 

Meroitic script, phonetic values:

5a6612f42da5f_Meroiticscriptalphabet2kawaobelisque.thumb.png.e56734bd16711761c28fe60e2b1bbc1c.png

Meroitic.thumb.png.55b66bec31bb7f402c985b43dc3314ce.png

 

My name in Meroitic script :) 

5a661347eec62_Meroticscriptmyname.jpg.05ee9761f45778eddb02eca34d8410d8.jpg

 

The Pyramids of Nuri, Jebel Barkal and Meroë:

5a66139e64564_Nuripyramids.thumb.jpg.73aef2bf361fd11024d2d22b604d4594.jpg

rck_4_-_dunham_d._royal_tombs_at_meroe_and_barkal.thumb.jpg.c09289da8d2cf1a810ce0d515ffead4a.jpg

5a6613ae29154_rck_4_-_dunham_d._royal_tombs_at_meroe_and_barkal2.thumb.jpg.304fd80f26383cef102b394ac33038be.jpg

5a6613b6ce0cb_rck_4_-_dunham_d._royal_tombs_at_meroe_and_barkal3.thumb.jpg.b4024a766bea331f0e49f3458b0c225b.jpg

 

War games miniatures:

Kushite2.thumb.JPG.171abe472cf46dfe05263d41f6c43ff1.JPG

Kushite4.thumb.JPG.32b2ca68d7574f633bb7b71ded9d425a.JPG

KushiteElephant.jpg.8f33c814ac0cd7ee9c6abe38b416a8c1.jpg

 

 

Edited by Sundiata
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The latest list of sources

For those who wish read up some more. Or a lot more... A list of sources I've been working with for the past few months.

I'll begin with one of the most valuable:  4 volumes, c. 1400 pages of text: Fontes Historiae Nubiorum: dealing with the written history of Kush, translations of countless Kushite stelae as well as discussions of Greek and Latin texts mentioning Kush (usually as aethiopia). Among it's writers, one of the world's most respected authorities on Kush, László Török. The texts were compiled in 1994, so it's a little outdated, which is something to keep in mind (many of the other sources I used are post-2010 research, and a lot of new things have come to light in the 23 years since its publication).

https://digitalt.uib.no/handle/1956.2/3083#preview (Fontes Historiae Nubiorum)

 

The rest:

Edited by Sundiata
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Kingdom of Kush: names and terminology:

A complete list of Napatan words for every structure and unit

@elexis, @stanislas69, @wowgetoffyourcellphone, @Hannibal_Barca

The Meroitic language remains barely understood, but luckily for us, the Egyptian dialect, known as Napatan was used widely until the 3d century BC, and is well understood. 

Fontes Historiae Nubiorum is an extensive collection of translations of Kushite texts, as well as a discussion of Greek and Latin texts mentioning Kush. The fourth volume contains a selected list of (Napatan) Egyptian words used in the various texts, and provides us with all the names and terminology we need. I made a selection of words potentially relevant to 0AD, suggestions are welcome (try to to go through the original texts in the first 2 volumes to understand the context within which these words are used).

One hiccup is that it's all written in phonetics, and I have no easy way of writing phonetics (or copy-pasting from the scanned source) at the moment. So it's just bare bone letters, without the extra symbols, making proper pronunciation very difficult. The fact that vowels were largely ignored by Kushites makes pronunciation even more difficult. If somebody feels compelled to redo this list with all the correct phonetic values, I'd be eternally grateful.

A few examples on how some of these words are popularly pronounced today:

  • T3 sti : Ta Seti (land of the bow)
  • Nhsyw: Nehesi (nubians)
  • Mdw-Ntr: Medu Neter (god's words, hieroglyphs) 
  • Pdty : Pitati (archers)
  • Npt : Napata

There are a few Meroitic titles included, and a single semitic loanword for camel, used in the ancient Egyptian language. I tried my best to use the most appropriate words and combination of words available, but I'm not a linguist, and mistakes are very possible. 

The following list contains the generic name, followed by the indigenous one, followed by the literal translation for every term:

Structures:

Barracks : pr-ms’yw  (house of soldiers)

Blacksmith : hmw h’y n r3-‘ (weapon smith)

Civil Centre : Pr-nsw (palace, royal residence)

Corral : ihy (stall)

Defense Tower : tsmt ‘3 (great battlement)

Dock : Mryt (harbour)

Farmstead : snwt (granary)

Field : sht (field, countryside)

Fortress : Htm (fortress, stronghold)

House : Pr (house)

Market : Pr-sbt (house of exchange)

Outpost : trtr (counterwork)

Pyramid large : mr ‘3 (great pyramid)

Pyramid small : mr (pyramid)

Sentry Tower : tsmt (battlement)

Storehouse : wd3t (storehouse)

Temple Amun : Pr-‘Imn (house of Amun)

Temple Apedemak: Pr-‘Iprmk (house of Apedemak)

Wall Gate : ’ryt (gate, door)

Wall : sbty (wall, fortress, stronghold)

Wall Tower : s3wt (battlement, wall)

Wonder : Mnw nht (mighty monument)

 

Units:

Camel javelinist : nhw Bulahau gml (auxiliary Blemmye camel)

Catafalque: Wtn n ‘Ist  (barque of Isis)

Cavalry javelinist : iry hr ssmwt (companion on horseback)

Cavalry Spearman : Htr (cavalry)

Champion Cavalry : Htr Ms’ n mh-ib  (elite cavalry)

Champion Elephant : Abore ‘h3 (war elephant)

Champion Infantry Archer : Hry pdty (captain of archers)

Champion Infantry Amun : rs ‘Imn (guardian of Amun)

Champion Infantry Apedemak : rs ‘Iprmk (guardian of Apedemak)

Hero Amanirenas : Amnirense qore li kdwe li (Amanirenas, qore and kandake)

Hero Arakamani : Qore ‘Irk.‘Imn  (King Arakamani)

Hero Nastasen : Nist3sne hwy pdt psdt  (Nastasen, he who smites the nine bows)

Infantry Archer : pdty Nhsyw (Nubian archer)

Infantry Clubman : nhw noba (nuba auxiliary warrior)

Infantry Merc Javelinist : nhw ‘h3w noba (nuba auxiliary missile warrior) 

Inantry Pikeman : si3wrd (mutilators)

Infantry Spearman : iry-rdwy Nhsyw (Nubian footman)

Infantry Swordsman : knw hps (khopesh soldier)

Siege Tower : iwn n ms (movable tower/siege tower, also translated as battering-ram)

Ship bireme : shry (ship)

Ship fishing : Wh’-rmw (fisherman)

Ship merchant : D3y sbt (river-boat of exange)

Ship trireme : shry ‘3 (great ship)

Female Citizen : shmt (woman)

Support Healer : w’b nsw (royal priest)

Support Trader : rmt sbt (man of exchange)

Hero Harsiotef : Harsiotef Kanakht Khaemnepet (Harsiotef the Mighty Bull appears in Napata) (I'll bring this up tomorrow) 

 

 

For technologies, take a look at the first section in selected Egyptian words in the spoiler: "overseers". I think this is what should make the Amun temple so special...

e.g.:

  • Imry-r snwt : overseer of a granary (+...% farming rate) 
  • Imy-r w’bw : overseer of Waab-priests (healers ...% healing rate)
  • Imy-r htm : overseer of a fortress (increase armour level of fortress by ... levels)
  • Imy-r kt : overseer of works (+ ...% general gathering rate)
  • ...

"Imy-r..." could be used in combination with other words to make a satisfactory selection of technologies, such as "Imy-r sd" (overseer of taxation): +...% income from international trade. There's a potential gold mine of ideas in the following list of words.

 

Selected Napatan Egyptian words recorded in Kush:

Spoiler

 

Overseers:

-               Imy-r : overseer

-               Imy-r w’bw : overseer of Waab-priests

-               Imy-r s nm hwt-ntr : overseer of every man of the temple complex

-               Imy-r ms’ : overseer of troop, general

-               Imy-r md3t : overseer of documents

-               Imy-r3 –pr : overseer of a temple

-               Imy-r hsiw : overseer of singers

-               Imy-r htm : overseer of a fortress

-               Imy-r sd3wtyw n pr-nsw : overseer of seals of the king’s estate

-               Imy-r snwt : overseer of a granary

-               Imy-r kdw : overseer of builders

-               Imy-r kt : overseer of works

 

Other titles:

-               W’b nsw : royal priest

-               Iry-p’t : hereditary prince

-               Iry-‘ : record keeper

-               Hry : overlord, master, lord

-               Shn : command, general

-               T3z, Tsy : commander

-               Imy-r3: general

-               Hry pyt : captain of archers

-               Hry hrp nfrw : commander in chief of cavalry

-               Mr ssmwt : cavalry general

-               P3 tsy3 n p3 mw: lord of the water, officer of the fleet [?]

-               Mr ms’ n p3 mw: general of the water

-               Wr : chief, chieftain

Meroitic titles:

-               Qore : ruler

-               Arbetke : corn-measurer

-               Kdke, ktke (kandake, candace): queen, king’s sister

-               Arbetke : corn-measurer

-               Pelmos : strategus, district comissioner

-               Pelmos adblise : strategus of the land

-               Pelmos atolise : startegus of the water

-               Peseto, pesto : king’s son, governor

 

Military:

-               Knw : soldier, brave fighter, war horse

-               Tsew : band, unit

-               D3m : recruit

-               Ms’, ms’yw : army, force, soldiers, troops

-               Pdty : bowman, archer

-               Stt : archer

-               Iry-rdwy : footman

-               Iry : companion

-               Nhw : auxiliaries

-               Htr : horse, cavalry

-               Tnt-htr : chariotry

-               Wrryt : chariot

-               Nb hps : lord of the khopesh

-               Ms’ n mh-ib : elite troops

-               Wpwti : messenger, envoy

-               Rs : guardian

-               Si3wrd : mutilators

-               Rd, rt : agent

-               Skd : sailor

-               iwn n ms: movable tower/siege tower

-               H3’’ : catapult 

 

Civilians:

-               Kiry : worker

-               K3ry : gardener

-               ‘hwty : cultivator

-               Iswt : gang of workmen

-               Hmw : craftsman

-               Wr hmw : master craftsman

-               Hmw nbw : goldsmith

-               Mniw : herdsman, herder

-               Sk3 : plower

-               Wh’-rmw : fisherman

-               Shmt : woman

-               Rmt : man

-               Niwtyw : townsmen

-               Grgw : hunter

-               Sri : child

 

Enemies:

-               H3ty sbiw : leader or rebels

-               Brw, hyr : enemy,oponent, rebel

-               Bds : rebel

-               Bst : rebellion

-               Hfty, hft : enemy oponent

-               Snti : insurgent

-               Hnr : prisoner

-               Skr : prisoner

 

Military Structures:

-               Htm : fortress, stronghold

-               S3wt : battlement, wall

-               Sin : mudbank

-               Tsmt : battlement

-               Trry : counter-wall

-               Trtr : counter-work

-               Trryt : embankment

-               Sbty, sbtt : wall, fortress, stronghold

-               Inb: wall

-               Inhy3 : enclosure

-               ‘Ryt : gate, door

 

Non-military structures:

-               Pr : house

-               ‘Wi : house

-               Mr : pyramid

-               Is : tomb

-               ‘h, ‘ht, ‘t : palace, royal residence

-               Pr-‘3 : palace, royal residence, great house

-               Pr-nsw : palace, royal residence

-               Hwt-ntr : temple complex, temple compound

-               Pr-hd : treasury

-               R3-pr, irpy, rpy, rpy3 : temple, sanctuary

-               Pr-‘Imn : House of Amun

-               Pr- ‘Iprmk : House of Apedemak

-               Hm : immage, statue

-               Tit, twt, twtw : image, statue

-               ‘t-hnkt : beer-hall

-               Wd3t : storehouse

-               Wd3 : magazine, storehouse

-               Sn’ : storehouse

-               Ihy : stall

-               Ih : stable

-               Snwt : granary

-               Wd3 : barn

-               Snwyw : court

-               Knbe : court

-               Mnw : monument

-               Hw : ruin

-               Mn, mtn, mtnw : road, avenue

-               Sht : field, countryside

-               Dmi, d3y, tyme : town, harbour

-               Mryt : harbour

 

Material:

-               Sny : tree

-               Snwt : palm grove

-               Kwk: fruit of Dom-palm

-               Bnr: date palm

-               Sndt : acacia

-               Hbn : Ebony

-               Nht : sycamore

-               ‘s : cedar

-               mnw : grove

-               St3w : stone, quarry

-               D’m : gold

-               Nbw : gold

-               Hd: silver/money/livestock

-               Hmt : copper

-               Db3t : brick

-               P3kt : fine linen

-               Ssr-nsw : royal linen

-               Sdb : garment

-               3by : panther skin

-               mht : feather

-               3bw : ivory

-               Irtt : milk

-               Iwf : meat

-               It : barley

-               Ikn : hoe

-               Nmt : chopping block

-               Ikmw : shield

-               H’y n r3-‘ : weapon

-               Pdt : bow

-               Ssr : arrow

-               ‘h3w : missile, arrow

-               inr : stone missile

 

Animals:

-               Dybn : animal, domestic animal

-               Smsm, ssmt : horse

-               T3y : stallion

-               Tsm : dog

-               ‘wt : small cattle, sheep and goat

-               ‘nh : goat

-               ‘3 : donkey

-               3pd : bird, fowl

-               Sr : giraffe

-               Rmw : fish

-               K3 : ox, bull

-               Hrp, i3dt, iht, hd, tp-i3w : cattle, livestock

-               Abore (meroitic): elephant

-               Gm(w)l (semitic loanword) : camel

 

Boats:

-               Shry : boat, ship, fleet

-               ‘h’ : boat, ship, fleet

-               d3y : river boat

-               Mhn : ferry

-               Wtn, wi3 : barque

 

Agression:

-               H3k : capture, plunder

-               H3t : advance

-               Sm3, sm3n : slaughter, massacre, blood bath, kill, slay

-               H3yt : bloodbath, slaughter

-               Dwn : drive off

-               Hfs : repel, hinder

-               Knkn : fight

-               Tp-rd n ‘h3 : plan of attack

-               Gw3 : besiege, close in on

-               Hd, ph : attack

-               Wdyt : campaign

-               Pg3 : battlefield

-               Hr-‘h3 : battlefield

-               Hdb : kill

-               Phrr : run

-               W’r : flee, withdraw

-               3’bt : suppression

-               ‘h3 : battle, war, attack

 

Other terms:

-               ‘h, hrwt : festival, feast

-               sd: taxation

-               sntr : incence, burn incence, cense

-               sbt : exchange

-               mdt : affair, matter, business, deed

-               d3d3t,  d3d3 : council

-               dw3 : worship, adore

-               drp : sacrifice

-               3srw : burnt offering

-               smnh : embellish, beautify

-               s’s3 : multiply

-               hk3et : measure

-               h’py : inundation

-               ntr : god

-               mdw-ntr: god’s word

-               fk3 : reward, bribe

-               wsr : strong

-               wsryt : mighty, powerful, strong

-               nht : might, mighty deed, victory, powerful

-               T3 sti : bow-land

-               Nhsyw : Nubians

-               Nbew (demotic) : Nubians

-               Blhlm (demotic) : Blemmye

-               Bulahau : Blemmye

-               i’i : irrigate

-               k3t : work, task, workmanship

-               kd : construction, build, rebuild

-               hr ssmwt : on horseback

-               B-r-w3-t : Barawe, Meroë

-               Bedewi, Bedewete (meroitic) : Meroë

-               Npt : Napata

-               Nptete (meroitic) : Napata

-               Ihy3 : wealth

-               Wtn n ‘Ist : barque of Isis

 

 

 

 

Edited by Sundiata
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have good recording equipment ? Kushites could maybe have your voice.

 

About phonetics you can find the chars online and just edit your post by copy pasting those.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, stanislas69 said:

Do you have good recording equipment ? Kushites could maybe have your voice.

Hahahaha, that would be such an honour, lol! Actually I do have decent equipment, I just haven't had the time to play around with it in the past year...

But I'd need some pretty clear instructions on what you need.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sundiata said:

Hahahaha, that would be such an honour, lol! Actually I do have decent equipment, I just haven't had the time to play around with it in the past year...

But I'd need some pretty clear instructions on what you need.

Guess this is https://trac.wildfiregames.com/wiki/Audio_Voice_List

Don't know if this thread is relevant too 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, stanislas69 said:

Do you have good recording equipment ? Kushites could maybe have your voice.

 

About phonetics you can find the chars online and just edit your post by copy pasting those.

This would be cool. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 26/01/2018 at 1:03 AM, Sundiata said:

Hahahaha, that would be such an honour, lol! Actually I do have decent equipment, I just haven't had the time to play around with it in the past year...

But I'd need some pretty clear instructions on what you need.

@Itms might have some tips to set you up. If you have a female friend that would like to do the female voices that would be perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 23/01/2018 at 1:32 AM, Sundiata said:

For those who wish read up some more. Or a lot more... A list of sources I've been working with for the past few months.

I'll begin with one of the most valuable:  4 volumes, c. 1400 pages of text: Fontes Historiae Nubiorum: dealing with the written history of Kush, translations of countless Kushite stelae as well as discussions of Greek and Latin texts mentioning Kush (usually as aethiopia). Among it's writers, one of the world's most respected authorities on Kush, László Török. The texts were compiled in 1994, so it's a little outdated, which is something to keep in mind (many of the other sources I used are post-2010 research, and a lot of new things have come to light in the 23 years since its publication).

This is not just good, interesting, and useful, it's real quality. I'm looking forward to the pdf you announced earlier :)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pre-Colonial African Cavalry Traditions 

Super Illustrated

When I was a lot younger, I came across 2 images of African pre-colonial heavy cavalry, which absolutely fascinated me. At the time I had never seen African cavalry, let alone heavy cavalry. In those early days of internet, it was very difficult to figure out where these images came from, or what exactly they were depicting. Luckily, times have changed, and we now know a lot more about these images, as well as the much broader context of ancient African cavalry traditions. Even more interesting for us, it has become apparent to me that the earliest diffusion of horses and cavalry culture into Central- and West-Africa came from none other than Kush and its periphery, which makes the study of African cavalry traditions all the more interesting from a Kushite perspective. 

Quilted cotton for horse and rider, seen on this cavalry man from the Kingdom of Baguirmi (Chad), once part of the great Kanem-Bornu Empire (neighbouring Sudan). The riders often wear a leather or iron/steel cuirass underneath the cotton armour. This 19th century rider is wearing a quilted cotton skullcap... This can not be unseen... Neither can his double tipped spear. These are the cataphracts of ancient Africa:

denham9.thumb.jpg.09964b47a8c8cc4027e944e6abf548f2.jpg

Imagine my elation when I stumbled across this exact type of armour in a basement exhibition on African history in the British Museum, by chance... They're even more imposing in real life! Those metal cuirasses were impressive, and were said to be able stop the ball of a musket. 

 

Chainmail was also widespread. Mounted body guard of the Sheik of Bornu, in full chainmail. Underneath his turban, he has a leather reinforced cap, made up of thick bands tied together at the top with those rectangular leather bits. Also, that armour piercing spear seems unpleasant...

5a7d8a27295dc_BodyGuardoftheSheikhofBornou.thumb.jpg.802261f8d0eb2c6d9c5a93b288a3f65d.jpg

 

Studying the similarities between ancient Kushite cavalry and later medieval cavalry traditions is made difficult because of the spread of Arab and Berber cavalry customs to the Sub-Saharan regions in later periods, which has totally overshadowed the earlier Sub-Saharan horse periods from an academic perspective. Most people including academics don't know that horses were being bred in Sudan as early 1500BC, which makes an accurate assessment of the origins of African cavalry traditions nearly impossible in the popular academic world. I hope that my research in this thread (including the reliefs and graffito depicting horses, written histories mentioning cavalry, and the burial of entire horses and their equipment in some of the royal tombs) goes some way to addressing this issue. Experts in the field have long written about the importance of horses, cavalry and chariotry in ancient Kush, but popular attitudes are sometimes hard to change.

Following points are interesting:

the existence of an ancient and large indigenous African horse-breed, known as the Dongolawi, which is markedly different from Arab or Barb horses, originated in Sudan and fits ancient descriptions. It predates the Arab and Barb horses in Africa, and was bred and exported widely on a large scale during antiquity. It is now found all across the Sudanic belt (from Sudan to Senegal), but has been interbred with foreign horse-breeds. Pure Dongolawi are rare, but still widespread.

The widespread similarities in Sub-Saharan horse-acutrements, including decorated bands of leather and/or cloth and metal across the chest and backside, metal bells, saddle-types, types of halter and types of stirrups and even the use of raised chamfrons as well as the use of semi-cercular cheek-guards is noteworthy.

Arab, Berber and Sub-Saharan cavalry traditions share certain commonalities, but are also very distinct from each other. Arabised African populations use Arab cavalry traditions. Berbers cavalry is part of the Numidian and even Roman heritage mixed in with Arab and Sub-Saharan influences. I believe Sub-Saharan cavalry traditions primarily come from a third "mystery" source: Kush... Especially along the Sudanic belt, a vast biotope stretching from the savannahs of Sudan to Senegal, culture, people, religions and technology moved relatively freely. Many similarities can be found among the otherwise very diverse people of this vast region, including similar cavalry traditions. It is no coincidence that some of Africa's largest empires were situated along this biotope, like the Mali Empire, the Songhai Empire, Kanem-Bornu, the Hausa city states and the Sokoto Caliphate.

Quilted cotton armour, which is first recorded in the Nile Valley in antiquity, was used by Kushites to cover horse and rider. This is a quintessentially African type of armour that was used in Sudan during the BC-era, and spread to Central- and West-Africa where it is used to this very day (mostly ceremonial). This specific type of armour is so wide-spread, that an ancient point of dissemination is almost unquestionable. It is used in countries from Sudan to Mali, including Chad, Niger, Nigeria, Cameroon, Burkina Faso, Togo... Quilted cotton was later spread in the Middle East by the Arabs through Egyptian influence and even appears in medieval Europe.

In the book "On the Erythraean Sea", the Greek historian Agatharchides, relating to Ptolemy II Nubian campaign, refers to a native type of felt armour for horse and rider that covers the whole body except for the eyes:

For the war against the Aithiopians Ptolemy recruited 500 cavalrymen from Greece. To those who were to fight in the front ranks and to be the vanguard - they were a hundred in number - he assigned the following form of equipment. For he distributed to them and their horses garments of felt (stolas piletas), which those of that country (hoi kata ten choran; "the natives of the country" in Burstein) call kasas, that conceal the whole body except for the eyes.

This is almost definitely Kushite quilted cotton. "that conceal the whole body except for the eyes"... I think I might know exactly what type of armour it was, and why it was so important. It was used by Kushites as an effective protection against arrows, which made it important for Ptolemies in their campaign against the archery heavy Kushite army. Here's an example of a 19th century Sudanese quilted cotton armour for horse and rider, covering the whole body except for the eyes, almost the same as the one used by the horsemen of Baguirmi and fitting ancient descriptions:

museum_1325302048.thumb.jpg.9f22887aab890c1cd7dc9f1787aa0e59.jpg

 

An ancient Kushite example?:

Scaler-3.jpeg.6891cbce327970c06aed8bf791e635af.jpeg

 

The iron cuirass worn underneath the quilted cotton armour of the riders of Baguirmi:

d50fecfec00e24e8ab6dbb82a295b83a.thumb.jpg.d7b544566d7bad4e0a03e5404babd817.jpg

5a7dbf5428e01_Africanironcuirass.jpg.f9bcdc53f0f3ae7a0cb291a66ae747d2.jpg

 

 

 

 

Anyway, enough talk from me, enjoy this very large collection of Pre-Colonial African cavalry illustrations:

Pre-Colonial African Cavalry in etchings and drawings:

Spoiler

 

19th century Kanem Bornu warriors

526582268.thumb.jpg.d614f826a068b5393d6759bf1069b442.jpg

 

Bornu warriors

5a7d9b81618b1_riderinarmorandbowmanfromBornu.thumb.JPG.aae1424a245430833141a2c2b150f84e.JPG

M095172.jpg.b0a7c78005363c798ea469b18c8f0f25.jpg

 

Lovely...

5a7d9b8b5311f_Uncavaliercuirass-thesudan.thumb.jpg.637fe66aa00529c27391ffd4102e1fde.jpg

 

Mossi cavalry doing some slave-raiding in Burkina Faso/Northern Ghana.

5a85fd66bab51_MossicavalryBslaveraidingafricancavalry.jpg.e6d0cab04c31a5b65c0b72e7a12c5b2f.jpg

 

The Mossi King and his horsemen

moissi-empire-1891.jpg.fce3cb43789636d4d743f239ce02a409.jpg

 

Mahdists in Sudan

i555.thumb.jpg.7cb649d9c0fa6efd6d4c8f07bf956ac5.jpg

 

Sudanese Mahdist warrior. That linen wrap-around looks very similar to our Kushite linen corselets

i079.thumb.jpg.4a1779f7c266079ca4a10615ba8838b7.jpg

 

Sudanese Mahdist warriors during a cavalry charge into musket fire. If you look closely, these 19th century warriors are wearing linen "corselets" remarkably similar to the ancient Nile Valley equivalent.

i221.thumb.jpg.e1dd5432302a24bed1ea0aa617ee30ab.jpg

main-qimg-7916e4947f48d17d015a38dd77f2db48.png.35b5363a3bac808fc1918ced8deb25b0.png

 

Ethiopian cavalry 

5a85fd4fbef35_Abyssinian_soldiers_surrender_to_the_Army..._Pictures__Getty_Images.thumb.jpg.100d3c4bb3d753db6b766695e2dcd933.jpg

 

The Ethiopian Emperor Tewodross II fought a rather disastrous war against the British, who employed Indian war-elephants and heavy artillery. The British didn't stick around though. Menelik II had consolidated power as quickly as Tewodros II had been defeated.

2131689197_9654f94802_b.thumb.jpg.4fc769055f1181dbe5ecf610c611a031.jpg

 

Emperor Menelik II, sovereign of the Abyssinian Empire of Ethiopia, marching with an immense army of more than a hundred thousand men, and almost 9000 horses towards Adwa, to face an Italian force of more than 10.000 Italians and tens of thousands of native levies including Eritrean Ascari and Oromo horsemen, in 1896. The Battle of Adwa was the largest single defeat of a modern European force in African history and it was decisive. The Italian army was completely decimated, and the Italians were forced to recognise Ethiopian sovereignty. As the only African nation to successfully resist European colonialism, Ethiopia became a symbol of hope and resistance for African liberation struggles around the world.

5a7d9b541b57d_EmperorMenelikIIbattleofAdwaAdoaAbyssinianEmpireEthiopia.thumb.jpg.362d6a553c2054446ac54c32f78b6bad.jpg

 

Menelik II also started construction on Ethiopia's first rail-way from Addis Ababa to Djibouti.

5015834367_28da5e3e7d_b.jpg.80789a8f10b7a2270025f6032ac89289.jpg

 

Ras Makonnen, brother of Emperor Menelik II and father of Emperor Haile Selassie I, was one of the main commanders at the battle of Adwa

Ras_Mekonnen_Amba_Alage-2.thumb.jpg.1f7791b1646e438ddd34fb23ccdd0396.jpg

 

Emperor Menelik II and Ras Makonnen

f1e99518963c6d8a8840d9c10d5ef3f5-1.thumb.jpg.eeb91b551a2ea48841c5c7cf4b0af350.jpg

 

Abyssinian warriors, Ethiopia

5a870ff136394_Ethiopianwarriorsabyssinia.thumb.jpg.4f8206c41e6d4bc5f2cdd3db359d3fff.jpg

 

Early Kanem Bornu

imageskanembuchief9jb.jpg.0ffa0da7fde70123023c678568fe1448.jpg

 

A king's favourite wife..

5a7d9b2109ffd_AFavoriteoftheSeraglioAccompanyingaMilitaryExpedition.thumb.jpg.74627e490b3cbd5d1ddaa8d85bac74ba.jpg

 

Heavy cavalry and infantry-man from the Sudanese Mahdist revolution in the late 19th century. These are some of the last real African knights to ride in to battle in full chain mail. Chainmail causes bullets to fragment in to splinters (very ugly wounds), so that didn't work out too well for them...

b7ae6e84527bb1cc548656f9924bc9ca.jpg.26aa8910f03adbc8addbae42de2a226d.jpg

 

Cavalry from the Sudanese Sultanate of Sennar alongside a British merchant. The Sultanate of Sennar was one of the last independent Sudanese states, before its assimilation in to the Ottoman Empire.

4499132027_3a64e50bfa_b.thumb.jpg.9e0a03dcdcb87a9c6d556585673680b0.jpg

 

The Nobatian King Silko (Nubia, Sudan), alongside a Blemmye archer and a Roman frontier guard. After the central authority of Meroë started weakening, the Romans "invited" the Noba (semi-nomadic Western Desert dwellers) to settle Lower Nubia, as Roman foederati to protect the Roman frontier in Southern Egypt. Many aspects of Nobatian culture was directly inherited from their earlier Meroitic overlords. 

5a86febe185a0_NubianKingsilkonobatia.thumb.jpg.3a0018485c2e741c78f77b23845f0e1a.jpg

 

Typical Sudanic quilted cotton on the African savannahs

1421921257269.jpg.b115d0203126e53710f6730c48b5e165.jpg

 

The Oba of Benin meets with Portuguese traders. 

58746fb369b0b477327b46111353326f.thumb.jpg.8e743e1a69038fc0cfd4df6bf841d421.jpg

 

The Oba of Benin. Benin was an ancient and powerful city state in the Southern Nigerian rainforest, famous for it's brass-cast heads of royals, known as the Benin Bronzes. They were fond of leopards...

ancient_africa_2_by_byzantinum.jpg.206ef6c989bb8d80eed07aed4216015b.jpg

 

A commander in the army of the Ashanti empire, one of the most powerful military forces in Africa at the dawn of colonialism (modern day Ghana), second only to that of the Abyssinian Empire (Ethiopia). The use of massed musketry and advanced military tactics and strategy made Ashanti a formidable opponent to European colonisers, resulting in no less than 4 Anglo-Ashanti wars spread over almost a 100 years of fighting before the British managed to subdue them. Ashanti are not known today for their horses, but used to maintain a royal cavalry force at the capital city of Kumasi. Tse Tse flies wiped out the horses in the 18th century...

post-2895-0-76616300-1328494617.jpg.498ad543768080d8077ad12f8c1ccc27.jpg

 

Another Ashanti commander, wearing the batakari war-smock and wearing a ram-horn headdress with feathers still worn by the right hand of the Akan kings today.

5a7d9b2ce3b60_African_mounted_soldier_c_1820.thumb.jpg.1bdcc7c1382757b5bee4bbe0d345fe21.jpg

 

Senegalese horseman, 1780's

5a881def9d91c_VILE-120-Horse-MountedSoldierSenegal1780s-fromHitchcockssite.thumb.jpg.b8cb009e157983776658090f92256ec9.jpg

 

3cfdbd4299102e47952cbeacfb940b62.jpg.44ab0147b5ddcce3462936355bf975f5.jpg

 

From the Faras cathedral in Nubia, Sudan, Makurian period.

5a7d9b638d7a0_Horsemeninfarascathedralchristiannubiamedievalperiod.thumb.png.405bd00eb368fdb05631d07475fd62df.png

 

Ethiopian cavalry in medieval Christian Ethiopian church paintings:

SS2511715.thumb.jpg.919a7b3c89035b6604570b77820e32a0.jpg

Ethiopian_Church_Painting_(2376981245).thumb.jpg.c89751f7f34c25a1683d12fd7075ac2b.jpg

 

Saint George slaying the dragon

5a8609b10f5d0_painting-of-saint-george-patron-saint-of-ethiopia-slaying-a-dragon-debrebirhan.thumb.jpg.7877f540c6737191c309aebf687f9706.jpg

 

 

 

 

Pre-Colonial African Cavalry in Pictures:

Spoiler

 

Sudanese quilted cotton in the field. The rider on the right is wearing a heavy chain-mail armour. Notice the hundred or so cavalry men lined in the distance behind this pair.

sudan_cavalry_west_kordufan_1910_small_165.jpg.216ccdcd4ca47b25615f2bf0c4d72212.jpg

 

Rider from Sudan

57f88d2fc24cb3808a6e0688186d1e59.jpg.18d54fdf0ea5bc0892b08dfd622892f5.jpg

 

Sultan of Dar Masalit, Sudan

aljinana.jpg.82eb6a8336c717840ef189b7ade811e0.jpg

 

Gift from the Sultan of Darfur, Sudan, to the British governor. Quite incredibly, both of the men in this picture are wearing wrapped linen corselets, seemingly identical to the ancient type worn by Kushites and Egyptians!

gift-from-sultan-of-darfur-DRFA52.thumb.jpg.ada7c789910e89095d31e24c6582147f.jpg

 

Rider from Darfur, Sudan

5a860d969c5f2_Darfurhorse.thumb.jpg.aa1856cadec676225889d50a893fdc0e.jpg

 

 

Nupe rider, from Bida, Nigeria

46a9645b82df1028ca0a368f29eeae6a--armour-swords.jpg.6b4b0fbf46c17814fa7d5ceeaa7ff38e.jpg

 

Flaps open for ventilation?

bildarchiv_24.png.77fe5e8a915867b5e245880b13011b7b.png

ee5d941b747d163f48ca7491813c608f.thumb.jpg.fa80227144cb752863fe199aeae1e76a.jpg

 

Cavalry of the Kingdom of Bamun, at the ancient capital of Fumban, Cameroon

Bamum_riders_at_a_cavalry_festival_in_Fumban-2.jpg.58de09b32a6c0feaddd44c28d881c063.jpg

Bamum_riders_in_Fumban.jpg.e4a4f5431d92a6a5d3d10ca7815ba788.jpg

Bamumriders.jpg.3e0fdcbf3e6a87692e5cdaffa330631a.jpg

QE320099051.jpg.558d9f992fa51bc1eebdd75d2d5f0526.jpg

A_relative_of_the_Chief_with_servants.jpg.5096de8f15d4e66e8b331b3f77970d04.jpg

King_Ndjoya_on_the_mission_station.jpg.79ab598df2753a84b211db6096ae38da.jpg

Cameroon_Grassfields_A_brother_of_King_Njoya_His_Inspector_of_Horses_All_the_horses_in_the_town_belonged_to_the_King.jpg.807d32dbc9624337aaf50e7eaee9d7be.jpg

Chiefs_brother_on_horseback_in_Fumban.jpg.002c77e889b74970cd096c554f82b088.jpg

 

Riders in front of the palace at Fumban

Nz_Monkuob_an_uncle_of_King_Ndjoya_on_horseback.jpg.9dbdeda0584a0c3132bfb565eeccf59d.jpg

The_old_royal_palace.jpg.1d96e584464e869b758048303ba23fa7.jpg

 

medium_large.1398255202.jpg.457e4486e7354dc0504d9b0e5cb535bd.jpg

 

a1ccf9e033aa01d7caf73ad8afbfd8bd.thumb.jpg.473edc0d79d1d3b39d40cc1078931a52.jpg

 

5a7dafd594d86_Menonhorseback.gif.c4f8589567689acf6f10c68f85db6957.gif

 

Mundang horsemen

5a7dafd96ca6e_Mundanghorsemen.jpg.f30d2bc8b857ffc22a30933b639fee7d.jpg

18423a95a7bac59a59f26bc4412fa8cf.jpg.36e9c9af2dada3a0753e43f35439ebea.jpg

5d4d15db97255031301789b5b9dda2a5.thumb.jpg.da51a4c4214a5553a57fc103a54a4cf7.jpg

3.jpg.f1ba0ea2bb6eb745e42595388148db8c.jpg

ef1f7b8f74b3fe63819b8e5e7311a1de.thumb.jpg.d600e86488c453240c884626b8db452e.jpg

5a7d9b3fd5b09_cavalrybodyguardsoftheShehuofDikwaBornuEmirateinNigeria.jpg.eff7d7b97d5ec718c6a9911f802ea228.jpg

 

5a7d9b5769fdf_Fulbewarriorchadquiltedcottoncavalryhorsema.thumb.jpg.a456ffc25861d950f46f6c90321ced59.jpg

 

Dikwa horseman. Head is covered with chainmail. I suspect there's an entire armour underneath all that fabric.

2a487620be8257fe3de78d261099ec75--armour-swords.jpg.e1717403060caf88fcb7262ca5004036.jpg

 

A Majestic example of the Dongolawi horse-breed! A strong and tall horse with a relatively short back and a concave head.

b5e1461fb2240173eb85b02be4662864.jpg.7c94c0180a9c604309612e6911207f99.jpg

 

Mounted soldiers from Dikwa wearing a chain mail vest

3-1.jpg.e455c401f32d5fe9bc1f2d67b1a26e17.jpg

 

Another chainmail vest and chainmail cap

5a7d9b28ad6ff_Africancavalrymanwithchainmailinchamba.thumb.jpg.a844771d5b5b2aafa8ae43099a5b8510.jpg

 

Hausa horseman

5a860d88401ba_Bornuhorseman.thumb.jpg.a3b4398b887efd347c5e92bc964c6a78.jpg

5a881df34c846_Africanhorseman.jpg.1ecaa498dda3c8a19e42aa5601b8f820.jpg

 

 

Nupe, bida

bildarchiv_18.png.e4de89f273c0cef0b7535762a84329a2.png

bildarchiv_15.png.a11c3260a7a2bd5b41830f9efb8024a9.png

 

Cameroon 

Cameroon_Grassfields_A_brother_of_King_Njoya_His_horse_with_festive_harness_He_himself_is_wearing_.jpg.100f6b270c6fe657818403c3551113b8.jpg

King_Njoya_of_Bamum.thumb.jpg.b537a26073533c591b57ff3a9be9ca07.jpg

 

Togo

Cabrais.jpg.40fb48f18f0116b94ea5b4e3207badc0.jpg

 

CcAy88PWAAEFvX-.jpg.ad64dfad1436f4d065f17e5ed888c814.jpg

 

Chad

5.JPG.36f205ffa24ad06c12256a4f69fbf139.JPG

 

The Shehu, ruler of the Dikwa emirate (a successor to the Bornu Empire) showing off.

6.thumb.JPG.ba62acdc4087c4d837ea11cb500d861e.JPG

5a7d9b87c1988_TheshehurulerofDikwaBornuemirate.jpg.6232a5328adecf48181877dfeb9fd651.jpg

 

Typical Touareg cavalryman with hide-shield

532712_4097931888667_1898807285_n.jpg.569bdde58a787d8e56549ff99868cb28.jpg

50345678.jpg.d8da907eabd94de047560b96f00bf578.jpg

 

The Hausa people from Northern Nigeria/Niger/Chad have some of the strongest cavalry traditions on the continent.

kanuri-horsemen-bornu.jpg.d776b11037f87792c55869af820a7fcc.jpg

 

Dahomey, Togo. The Kingdom of Dahomey was a militaristic power on the West African coast, fighting wars against the much larger Ashanti Empire, Oyo Empire and the French. They're famous for an all female Amazon unit, numbering up to 3000 fighting women!

Dahomey.jpg.4b8f150efbdeae01c7d0490da7a39c77.jpg

 

Ethiopian warrior with typical rhino hide shield

141551714.thumb.jpg.d00822082a1b47d0ed36a92209263130.jpg

 

Ethiopian noble

2530011956_f46b41e8ba_o.jpg.85171cbbcd2145c86b2e020b076f09d1.jpg

 

Ras Mulugeta, Ethiopian minister of War

5a860dca6ab7f_RasMulugetaEthiopianMinisterOfWarPhotographFromIllustratedLondonNewsSeptember281935Sto.thumb.jpg.6bf3f5d3316cf5510cb1ccde9ea33759.jpg

 

Emperor Menelik II himself

d5d9ec45d96a63eefcce1935f0a9b661.jpg.403dd087bca1620a9a4f7f14651ba2d3.jpg

 

Emperor Haile Selassie I

5a860d9de0671_EmperorHaileSelassieIonhorsebackhorse.jpg.47b97ca12cd67d9fb24afc7753f2c00e.jpg

 

Ankwe_man_on_horseback_Shendam_Nigeria_1923.thumb.jpg.2f1b61cdccc0ac511d30ffd7d0f2d48a.jpg

 

Northern Ghana

Frafra_market.jpg.cd4fbfece7d19b8967e3543aa3627746.jpg

 

A Hausa chief in Accra, Ghana

Haussa_Chief_in_Accra_with_servant_and_friends.jpg.ac5f72790e59a7595de2552825e55990.jpg

 

Northern Ghana

King_Zeberim_of_Nanumba.jpg.6a78b8ba6c62a12e4127ece18f9d5342.jpg

 

King of Tolon and Kasuli"

King_of_Tolon_and_Kasuli.jpg.32139bcb7c62c65f4b6fdb0751e4756e.jpg

 

Rider_in_Salaga_1928.jpg.c64ce976bf1708b5a8b809470938b830.jpg

 

Nigeria

Young_man_on_a_horse_Shendam_Nigeria_1923.jpg.5cf70cfcba02b520d5a7b264c6e7125e.jpg

QE300060059.thumb.jpg.76d21ce601dfefc4a1a0aac66b6afc32.jpg

50e5f3e6d8976c2c7a4bbea737fcfaa0.jpg.053b99f565d56382e11990ea7923c1fb.jpg

QE300060058.jpg.20e474dd9bdead82f5ed214b93611946.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Contemporary African Cavalry Traditions:

Spoiler

 

1485eaf680980fab3f3bd344c1e84709.thumb.jpg.d7130e198a728007cf4d43f69a4154ac.jpg

These 20th century dudes are wearing chain mail like it ain't nothing but a thing...

df10b972e8d4e639bc6434070de82ee3.thumb.jpg.5a2cd687e46db2962d5cd6800c733156.jpg

4586e39297f5428e7382f59517af4510.jpg.b7ff5691021084e4377e0f74a2d31883.jpg

739833E8-CFD8-4597-8699.jpg.27e0af6a9d6b5fd45069850f864752ca.jpg

 

Hausa are still a very prolific cavalry culture today. Highly decorated horses are a mark of distinction for nobility, and they are clearly very proud of their horses.

7CCDB7B7-7E5C-49FF-AD57-B5BCF4F492AD_cx0_cy12_cw0_w1023_r1_s.thumb.jpg.b2febca40b611dcff076400a27ee6a8a.jpg

Durbar-Festival-1.jpg.a5d7fbe3ffa3939574251dee3fd0840b.jpg

hsshrs-01440025.jpg.b05fd94239ca8f83500737bf02453c62.jpg

ns2photo-ARP2-Day3-20.thumb.jpg.9dd8774ff84ae7982418b05c9e05706b.jpg

001durbar-fantasia-kano-nigeria.jpg.aa4d6aaa41592c43dd4c9d245e163ead.jpg

6a00d8345c5c1b69e20154377df4d6970c.thumb.jpg.59974a8293c8c41eed6a65ce741785ad.jpg

5020420730_f72655b875_b.jpg.41d1ffdfd03a90676f88230e4945af49.jpg

horseback-riders.thumb.jpg.788bb67907c04bd0d04983b3f6c829ae.jpg

Kano-Durban8.jpg.1c309cd63e3b77a41a6b8bd6f3d2ac59.jpg

nigeria59.jpg.929e7e2f10e158c343c4bffe32438dd3.jpg

2521508_durbarfestival_jpeg090ce2666f959c7cd1c3a1038553fad4-1.jpg.e864bc61d248a32d465e40d9842be61c.jpg

Dubar-Festival-1-hotels.ng_.jpg.ebe1c1ad57e6f2c1c184eb722115c329.jpg

e0370b7f87336f9d913987eeb1deb554--le-palais-palais-royal.jpg.efccd28f567abd96884dd59a9a285b43.jpgphoto.jpg.7df45415e7c0301d7acdeccaecc7b6c6.jpg

Asiya-4.jpg.6c14d40bb302929d96531ace7f9da622.jpg

58c318869a2f41a57f80b3ae33e202a9-1.jpg.c2f44a63677fe14d30c2767ba98edc24.jpg

4213449602_a9989e74c0_o.thumb.jpg.dd9cda533dfb13850db1cf44866abf47.jpg

7d2fffc0765d30b5b72d7f6b6b3de63e.thumb.jpg.567a74b28cc54289ba94b074f00ea3a0.jpg

medium_large_2x.1448391262.thumb.jpg.626b36cd6fa28eb7468b8ac7fd230c6e.jpgMahayin-Doiki-Horse-Rider.jpg.806e8bef3e3e4521e353403d54874242.jpg

d672c5b9f5667c91cd7194c69a8aaaee.thumb.jpg.be648424b0f57d91a32dccaffb68ee81.jpg

Durbar-festival-Nigeria4.png.51415149292c94f20102dc0b84791cd0.png

e48ebba243015dfb4a31d545d096048c.jpg.d56b2e93177442e39cc2350775ac8746.jpg

13-Fika-Durbar-01.jpg.ab3ae674416c9a11156d6a5a7b7980a6.jpg

 

Fulani horsemen

5060d19496150cf65aae155fbc03ad7e.jpg.cccbe893d2fd57a321af8274c6f905fd.jpg

 

26_Sidibe_Ousmane_2.jpg.e8149c432872686c6f21506f936bb870.jpg

855e7f7b15c4b6ac0d106f19587fa151.jpg.324a6afd0f2f4fe82dc04bf76adbb5a4.jpg

Fulani_rider_and_horse.jpg.fe8e2a551b6548dc5ef16be45ab0efb8.jpg

f6049ef7b8e9c1c22e51a183f640b01f.jpg.eda3861d00b81565e45dc3d6a38a11ee.jpg

fulani-cavalry-demonstration-in-north-cameroon-reiterspiele-der-fulbe-ARTEFF.thumb.jpg.a9e46210b56000e5ef7615bd8f399379.jpg

 

Tiken Jah Fakoly 

42d2adbe26772aecb7115f95afea4ada.1000x1000x1.thumb.jpg.394a058479b7692ce7118936286641f2.jpg

 

Ethiopian horse-culture

23141900773_8bb29002c6_b.thumb.jpg.6e017934eee98b7a00a2198b4a464e9d.jpg

n_ethiopia.thumb.jpg.1e976a0630c6ba7824ae5ca581867db3.jpg

Seenaa-Solomon.jpg-800x450.png.3f6a0b7c8882d7a0438a89224f2eafc5.png

bb75f4c9bd6e9aa681b1e7c43fc60c01--ethiopia-in-pictures.thumb.jpg.19f5fde23f1dcb4a89c95e1a58f0e079.jpg

image1-4.png.eb3fa9f11281869bbac151df4815774c.png

a58038880969faa3502bf0b7be58c4fc.jpg.e0a5f32d76697210c51fccf4022bb60f.jpg

20aa8a8cedf1b5be2a205707ad6fcdaf.thumb.jpg.c2211c2c7a5952bbafebc9219c431e12.jpg

_62751449_01_ethiopia_oromo_afp.jpg.89a54799c7dfb7b6e5121fabdef0311e.jpg

 

Somewhere in West-Africa. This dude looks like he has a bunch of interesting stories to tell...

36672c7ecf5b18b8ecee3b9649d2b216.thumb.jpg.9b5285ee2fbe60c049e780b555e256fb.jpg

 

Chad

5a8620bee1a6c_chadnomad-stallion-zakouma-ranger-patrols.jpg.b43701ff328a716b90d925f31adba820.jpg

 

Chad, Fulani horse racing without saddles!

tchad6.jpg.5529a5cc1a51d92a40573928b69a3f38.jpg

 

Armed rangers in a wild-life reserve in Chad

pyzl3d3hcjo8qvkzqsjm.thumb.jpg.e5ea62ac35082ed00136348e11f2ee03.jpg

 

 

 

Mahdist armour for cavalry men, Sudan:

Spoiler

 

Just a few more  19th century Sudanese armours worn by Mahdist heavy cavalry. 

2416dc0fb89133fe901f55550d6bdf21.jpg.ef2309d96fe4b5a5171e4d28c4f563ae.jpg

8150e489ab9d5d5db9ebd4ed10532848.jpg.489b52829850c7bc9b41348b0047484e.jpg

H3027-L41989477.jpg.430c711840b8f76d4bc012c0cd0d4c1a.jpg

813541278369b150a801e94c8e0ace02_XL.thumb.jpg.89219a7bf76c84b2b427cb64554d7d77.jpg

 

Strong Ottoman and Khedive influence is noticeable in the helmets.

d0caebbd8650e8453d62ed259ff6dde7--battle-of-omdurman-armour.thumb.jpg.277fd1b01e55265f99bd9ae133c2cdb6.jpg

2cc32ad1a979506c1eba74ccefdc9d27.thumb.jpg.e38b3575cb14da0f3f4ed3d3c1e3ed5c.jpg

a7f0541954d006cd87e8f6f11ddc5d1d.thumb.jpg.e6f0323f3e62a2908ad0da968f266e50.jpg

1725a480a79f3dab4ab922e24b23dec3.jpg.a87883133a93a5cecb3683ca380cfb00.jpg

 

 

 

 

Edited by Sundiata
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those of you who liked the previous post on Pre-Colonial African Cavalry traditions, and those of you who haven't gone through the images yet:

The post has been extensively updated with a ton of new images and more information. 

It is now divided in 4 sections: 

  • Pre-Colonial African Cavalry in etchings and drawings
  • Pre-Colonial African Cavalry in Pictures
  • Contemporary African Cavalry Traditions
  • Mahdist armour for cavalry men, Sudan

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

warm up sketch gone too far lol. I think my learning Krita is going fairly well!

might as well throw this here

meroitic swordsman.jpeg

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×