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After digging into Japanese history around the time of 0 A.D, I've found out a few things that could make implementing Japan in "Rise of the East" an interesting challenge. I would be very enthusiastic about doing some more research if adding Japan is something that seems doable in the future, but here is what I know so far:

The period of about 300 B.C. to about 300 A.D. in Japan is known as the Yayoi period. Little is known about the time period since the earliest mention of Japan during the period comes as an afterthought in Chinese texts. The Chinese described it as a mainly agricultural society characterized by violent struggles. The land was split into hundreds of tribal communities according to the Chinese, which is most likely more accurate than the records of the Nihon Shoki, an early collection of Japanese history that claims the birth of a unified Japan to be 660 B.C.

According to archeological findings, the Japanese people during the Yayoi period experienced a great deal of turmoil and violent expansion. The people themselves are (although this is debated) thought to be from the island of Kyushu, and they arrived and expanded their influence onto the main island of Honshu in the beginning of the Yayoi period. Bronze weapons and rice farming during the period suggest heavy influences from China. Between the Jomon period (13,000-400 B.C.) and the Yayoi period, Japan's population is thought to have risen by about 4 million people. The main reasons for this are debated, but historians believe that a major influx of farmers from the Asian continent overwhelmed or absorbed the native hunter-gatherer population.

The reason I said implementing Japan could be a challenge is this. During at least the first half of the Yayoi period (300 B.C - 0 A.D), Japan was split into many competing (most likely warring) villages. Many excavated settlements were moated or built at the tops of hills. Headless human skeletons discovered in Yoshinogari site are regarded as typical examples of finds from the period. In the coastal area of the Inland Sea, stone arrowheads are often found among funerary objects. In essence, no unified Japan existed (outside of the Nihon Shoki). A dramatic shift occured however as the Yamato court rose in Japan around 250 A.D. With the rise of the court, power was shifted to a central administration and an imperial court (inspired by the Chinese government of the time). Huge changes in burial styles and military tactics also occured between the Yayoi and Kofun (250-538 A.D) periods that were likely to have been developed (undocumented, as essentially everything in Japan was) during the latter half of the Yayoi period.

That's what I've discovered so far. I don't know if any of it helps, but let me know what other information would be helpful in exploring this amazing civilization!

Some Sources I've found helpful:

http://www.jref.com/articles/yayoi-period.188/

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/yayo/hd_yayo.htm

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We considered adding Japan to the first half of 1000 AD, but we dropped the idea due to the fact the Japanese at the time would not represent the most famous, memorable time in their history (no samurais, no castles, etc). A Japanese faction in the timespan of 0AD would be totally unrecognizable to the public.

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It's true that Japan during this period would be very different from the "golden ages" of Japanese society, but I don't think it would be completely unrecognizable. For one, the style of Japanese architecture used during the time period was very distinct. Raised houses like this one were very unique and iconic to Japan's history.

cimg3040.jpg

In addition, the turmoil and village societies of Japan during the period would fit right into the game, as it centers around many such civilizations. I agree that Japan was very different from most people's view of "Japan" as a country, but there are elements to Japanese society and culture that were first introduced to the area in the Yayoi period, and have continued for centuries since. Depending on the true "cut-off" dates of 0 A.D, there were several iconic figures that surfaced in Japan around this time, including Yamato Takeru, and Ōbiko.

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Yayoi Japanese were indeed quite unique - certainly more tribal-like than their more sinitized Kofun ~ Asuka descendant, although I am not sure if we can find enough information to make a full civ out of it. Warrior in twin-tails (haistyle) seems awesome though.

(for example the unit choice seems quite limited - spear, axe, sword, shield, bow, i think that's about it. Crossbow if we want to stretch it a bit, but no slinger, no javelin AFAIK, no horsemen of any kind and no chariot of any kind. Although Yayoi Japanese had warships, we don't know what it look like).

Edited by wolflance
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On 19/10/2015 at 1:59 AM, wolflance said:

Yayoi Japanese were indeed quite unique - certainly more tribal-like than their more sinitized Kofun ~ Asuka descendant, although I am not sure if we can find enough information to make a full civ out of it. Warrior in twin-tails (haistyle) seems awesome though.

(for example the unit choice seems quite limited - spear, axe, sword, shield, bow, i think that's about it. Crossbow if we want to stretch it a bit, but no slinger, no javelin AFAIK, no horsemen of any kind and no chariot of any kind. Although Yayoi Japanese had warships, we don't know what it look like).

Use Korean as mercenary and others related. Pirates may be from another Asian faction.

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Most Japanese horses are descended from Chinese and Korean imports, and there was some cross-breeding with indigenous horses which had existed in Japan since the stone age.[20] Although records of horses in Japan are found as far back as the Jōmon period, they played little or no role in early Japanese agriculture or military conflicts until horses from the continent were introduced in the 4th century.[21] The Kojiki and Nihon shoki mention horses in battle.[22]

Amongst the Imperial aristocracy, some were especially renowned for their horsemanship.[23] It was cavalry, not infantry, which proved to be decisive in the Jinshin War of 672-73, in Fujiwara no Hirotsugu's rebellion in 740 and in the revolt of Fujiwara no Nakamaro in 756.[24]

 

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Jōmon Period (ca. 10,000–300 BC)Edit

Near the end of the Jōmon period (ca. 300 BC), villages and towns became surrounded by moats and wooden fences due to increasing violence within or between communities. Battles were fought with weapons like the swordslingspear, and bowand arrow. Some human remains have been found with arrow wounds.

Not Skirmishers but slingers...

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Yayoi period (300 BC – 250 AD)Edit

Bronze goods and bronze-making techniques from the Asian mainland reached what is now Japan as early as the 3rd century BC. It is believed that bronze and, later, iron implements and weapons were introduced to Japan near the end of this time (and well into the early Yamato period). Archaeological findings suggest that bronze and iron weapons were not used for war until later, starting at the beginning of the Yamato period, as the metal weapons found with human remains do not show wear consistent with use as weapons. The transition from the Jōmon to Yayoi, and later to the Yamato period, is likely to have been characterized by violent struggle as the natives were soon displaced by the invaders and their vastly superior military technology.[1] Historian John Kuehn believes that a possible "partial genocide" of Japan's aboriginal people occurred during this period.[2]

 

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By the end of the 4th century, the Yamato clan was well established on the Nara plain with considerable control over the surrounding areas. The Five kings of Wa sent envoys to China to recognize their dominion of the Japanese Islands. The Nihon Shoki states that the Yamato were strong enough to have sent an army against the powerful state of Goguryeo. Yamato Japan had close relations with the southwestern Korean kingdom of Baekje. In 663, Japan, supporting Baekje, was defeated by the allied forces of Tang China and Silla, at the Battle of Hakusonko in the Korean peninsula. As a result, the Japanese were banished from the peninsula. To defend the Japanese archipelago, a military base was constructed in Dazaifu, @#$%uoka, on Kyushu.

 

Yamato Period (250–710 AD)Edit

Ancient Japan had close ties with the Gaya Confederacy in the Korean Peninsula, as well as with the Korean kingdom of Baekje. Gaya, where there was an abundance of naturally occurring iron, exported abundant quantities of iron armor and weapons to Wa, and there may have even been a Japanese military post there with Gaya and Baekje cooperation.[citation needed]

In 552, the ruler of Baekje appealed to Yamato for help against its enemies, the neighboring Silla. Along with his emissaries to the Yamato court, the Baekje king sent bronze images of Buddha, some Buddhist scriptures, and a letter praising Buddhism. These gifts triggered a powerful burst of interest in Buddhism.

In 663, near the end of the Korean Three Kingdoms period, the Battle of Baekgang (白村江) took place. The Nihon shokirecords that Yamato sent 32,000 troops and 1,000 ships to support Baekje against the Silla-Tang force. However, these ships were intercepted and defeated by a Silla-Tang fleet. Baekje, without aid and surrounded by Silla and Tang forces on land, collapsed. Silla, now viewing Wa Japan as a hostile rival, prevented Japan from having any further meaningful contact with the Korean Peninsula until a far later time. The Japanese then turned directly to China.

Our Koreans enter here :D

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Kofun

The Kofun period (古墳時代 Kofun jidai) is an era in the history of Japan from around 250 to 538 AD. It follows the Yayoi period. The word kofun is Japanese for the type of burial mounds dating from this era. The Kofun and the subsequent Asuka periods are sometimes referred to collectively as the Yamato period. The Kofun period is the earliest era of recorded historyin Japan; as the chronology of its historical sources tends to be very distorted, studies of this period require deliberate criticism and the aid of archaeology.

IMG_7678.JPG

IMG_7679.JPG

IMG_7680.JPG

 

https://forums.civfanatics.com/threads/resources-for-unit-makers.295004/page-2#post-8726422

Edited by Lion.Kanzen

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I think unique and unrecognizable is great to mod. As implied, there's a lot of focus on the later periods of Japan but not the earlier ones. One of the more interesting aspects of 0 AD is how it brings historical accuracy to dynasties that few would know about such as the Mauryan and the Seleucid dynasties. I think it's a great idea to bring less familiar versions of civilizations we've come to know to ROTE.

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Japan is a game on its own. If this mod were implemented I'd like to see it present the warring states separately as well as the reigning dynasty.

After all, the most common stereotype in Japanese history is Ronins vs. Samurais, and then the Swords vs. Guns period. There's a lot to unpack (and dismantle) with just those two.

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Illustrations of Japan during 0AD's timeframe

 

So I have a bunch of Japanese references I collected but never shared before... This is mostly Yayoi period, and a little Jomon period. I actually think this civilisation can be done... The biggest issue, just off the top of my head, is: no cavalry... 

 

yayoi2.thumb.jpg.69c76eee31c79f6d0a4e3a1ada637cdf.jpg

 

Here's a full unit roster... How 'bout that...

82_1_20120706213551.thumb.jpg.368be48528616e9f557562083975069e.jpg

990eb1f2db091e44b5517d92255acdaf--samurai-wars-ainu-people.jpg.775cd26c1067bfdd98694b2d5d81028e.jpg

the-fourth-mongoloid-migration-yoshinogari-defenses.thumb.jpg.10e8885d52b3dfa94c439ba8a4fe2543.jpg

k3alhz0dzav4tznzc8hi.jpg.bced33491ef4ba095186cf92f9fabc76.jpg

d1d37a9c7498f351072532462daa2f5b--yayoi-era-historical-pictures.jpg.26c7e6903ce137f97dc131211f9d0a92.jpg

019-1.jpg.3823af161b8c61d12fbbbd2915652f61.jpg

541323917.thumb.jpg.d627119c8f4a98a80eef791c781f3af6.jpg

abb1dbf1c0d926114e8e6b6e02071893--yayoi-era-iron-age.jpg.7f062eaae0be2257ef5d238315f3be3a.jpg

2ae583b7f1b604e8db4c9f1d95e78625.jpg.3faee448e929d266f77f3d07e7b07a69.jpg

2d2ae957bce1f05d8d91c3768e0645a1c01d15f3_hq.jpg.d01cb09f487adcae894b92464658ab08.jpg

 

Temple:

5a59e0f166ed6_11-5.InnerShrineIseMiePrefecture.jpg.0bf4bad1d8a43f52f408b7316ed719a5.jpg

 

 

The following images are mostly very high quality reconstructions from the Yoshinogari archaeological park:

"Yoshinogari (吉野ヶ里 遺跡 Yoshinogari iseki) is the name of a large and complex Yayoi archaeological site in Yoshinogari and Kanzaki in Saga Prefecture, Kyūshū, Japan. According to the Yayoi chronology established by pottery seriations in the 20th century, Yoshinogari dates to between the 3rd century BC and the 3rd century AD. However, recent attempts to use absolute dating methods such as AMS radiocarbon dating have shown that the earliest Yayoi component of Yoshinogari dates to before 400 BC." -wikipedia-

 

Civic Center:

53ibpgkmbty381rqhrywsj8s1kwa2zrln.thumb.jpg.b27de8f6a9a8e80cd1bb7384c3dc9152.jpg

y-yoshinogari-ceremonial-hall-watchtower.jpg.c60285b1f911bbb48b6d557e3b77cdeb.jpg

 

Farmstead:

Yoshinogari_Yayoi_Village_a003.jpg.f04e7fc6474d29e46fe51ddfb9905151.jpg

Toro_saiden.thumb.jpg.6f11b6e10bde3eceaef5a0c489047089.jpg

 

Houses:

1-800px-rulers-dwellings.jpg.a3fbf2cba0c7a8ad185a4fbc24a1a76d.jpg

4493246267_47d33e6aea_o.jpg.bf11e32636dd03901a9d0a84831f684d.jpg

yoshi3.jpg.f29ebc91f35dec323fcad175a307ac2a.jpg

yuduki3.jpg.e2ff8f18783a90345f3bb7d39c7aaa19.jpg

Yoshinogari-12.thumb.jpg.d507f8eea7a6520d2aba13471c5616a5.jpg

 

Special building:

9fab7e41fcf926d828b21c62cfcabbcb-1.jpg.7a3cc45b0a1c996c168fe94372b2bf43.jpg

100461015_624.jpg.ba762a09feaacfd607b40a57917caa57.jpg

 

Walls:

0011_4.jpg.19c3387c3763b39c86b681183638dbfb.jpg

0232-medium.jpg.47fb3c8323035f5285bfb882d2b584d7.jpg

 

Other stuff:

8060387971_67cb12ac84_o.thumb.jpg.db5ee9f97002661f16257ebcb3ce5b70.jpg

 

 

 

DSCN0702-1024x768.jpg

Yoshinogari-Remains.jpg

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@stanislas69, yeah, I think they'd be really cool for Terra Magna... They're very unique, not really what people would expect, yet , just recognisably Japanese.. 

They had relations with the Chinese and the Koreans during this period. Future project, perhaps? 

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2 minutes ago, Sundiata said:

@stanislas69, yeah, I think they'd be really cool for Terra Magna... They're very unique, not really what people would expect, yet , just recognisably Japanese.. 

They had relations with the Chinese and the Koreans during this period. Future project, perhaps? 

It was planned, I just didn't have the time. Also, there were concerns about them being not developed at all, as what most people know is medieval Japan.
But if you feel like transforming this thread like the one you did for Kushites, be my guest, who knows, maybe artists will be interested :)

That applies for any thread btw. You did a great job motivating Lordgood :P

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28 minutes ago, stanislas69 said:

 

That applies for any thread btw. You did a great job motivating Lordgood :P

Uh oh

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Just now, LordGood said:
29 minutes ago, stanislas69 said:

 

That applies for any thread btw. You did a great job motivating Lordgood :P

Uh oh

Hahaha... In due time... First I need to round up the Kushite research :P 

If I'm done with them, I want to re-focus my research on the various civs in-game, and potential candidates like the Yayoi Japanese.

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The Xiognu/Hsiung-nu (Mongolia) and Han (China) were important civilizations with a lasting influence on eastern Eurasia, including our present world; eventually both ought to be included in 0 A.D.'s main distribution, ideally. They deserve it as much as the Parthians and Romans.

On the other hand, although they fit 0 A.D.'s timeframe, the Go-Joseon (North Korea), Jin (South Korea), and Yayoi (Japan) archaeological periods are probably too insignificant to be included.

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33 minutes ago, Nescio said:

The Xiognu/Hsiung-nu (Mongolia) and Han (China) were important civilizations with a lasting influence on eastern Eurasia, including our present world; eventually both ought to be included in 0 A.D.'s main distribution, ideally. They deserve it as much as the Parthians and Romans.

Agreed, 100%

 

33 minutes ago, Nescio said:

On the other hand, although they fit 0 A.D.'s timeframe, the Go-Joseon (North Korea), Jin (South Korea), and Yayoi (Japan) archaeological periods are probably too insignificant to be included.

But, but, Japanese... :(

"probably too insignificant to be included." Although that might be correct, it's also very subjective. The Yayoi period laid the foundation for the Kofun period, the first unification of much of Japan. The Jomon and Yayoi have been quite the sensation in modern day Japan as well, so I'm sure Japanese gamers would die for this, and they are a huge demographic. I like to look at the Yayoi as horseless Oriental Celts :P . They're mainly for Oriental flavouring, and contrasting the Han Chinese. I don't think they've been depicted in a computer game before either (a nice first for 0AD), and they look quite exotic.

As for Koreans, I don't know... Perhaps a miniciv?

I really like the miniciv idea (unplayable, truncated civs), and think a nice list of "lesser" civilisations can really help the flavour of the game, bring maps alive (creeps), and contextualise and connect existing civs. 

 

Edited by Sundiata
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32 minutes ago, Sundiata said:

"probably too insignificant to be included." Although that might be correct, it's also very subjective.

It partially is, yes. (I also think the “Iberians”, an amalgam which includes many non-Iberian peoples, is too insignificant, yet it is included nevertheless.) However, why ought e.g. the Yayoi period be included, other than being Japan in 0 A.D.'s timeframe? Did they heavily influence their neighbours? Did they construct lasting monuments? Have any literary works survived? Have their cults or language reshaped large parts of Eurasia? I fear the answer to these questions is no; merely “being there” and nothing else seems just insignificant.

 

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