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Unit And Building Names

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Building´s Names in Gallaic-lusitanian(proto-celtic language), based according the philologist Hyginus Martins:

STRUCTURES

House: Tegos.

Civil Centre: Treba.

Defense Tower: Tursis (*PIE)

Fortress: Briga or Brixs.

Barracks: Rātion.

Temple: Nemedon.

farm: woikslā. (*PIE)

Dock: Kala.

Stone Wall: Ande-rātis.

Pallisada: Klētā.

City Gate: Trebam Durom.

*in Proto Indo-europeu.

Edited by Ardworix

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Hi guys.

When you click on a melee unit to check the kind of damage it has (hack), in the spanish version, it appears as "cortar madera" wich actually means "to chop".

I dont know how to translate it properly since my inglish isnt good at all. But i guess that you are looking for something like "cortar" wich means to slice / to cut...

Edited by toMb1

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Maybe this page can help? http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hack_and_slash. It's about the genre, but you have terms for both "hack" and "slash" in there.

Here's a list of attack types I collected for my translation work - when you translate, make sure you find terms for the whole field. You should also look at how other games translate these terms, e.g. Battle for Wesnoth.

  • pierce
  • piercing
  • impact
  • energy
  • arcane
  • cold
  • slashing
  • ranged attack
  • melee attack
  • blade
  • fire
  • smash
  • gaze
  • glaive
  • shield
  • hack
  • buckler
  • shield bash
  • naphtha attack
  • fire arrow
Edited by GunChleoc

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From what I actually know, our current Carthaginian names are actually Hebrew, as there isn't much information about Punic.

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Could it be possible to rename the Seleucid sword champ,

Argyaspide Thorakite

(peferably with quick spelling)

What the corps named this way? They certainly did not carry silver sheild. So, I don't think they should be called Silver Shield Swordsman unless their corps was called this. It may depend on your read of the source material, but I do not have it on my hands at this moment.

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I see that name before, used for roman fashioned swordsman. Is in the sources but about this unit like theuorophoros with swords and heavy armor is some dark because is not clear in main source( ancient historians) but is bad writed and I'm not sure if was an argyraspide unit.

You mean this thing

http://www.honga.net/totalwar/rome2/unit.php?l=en&v=rome2&f=rom_seleucid&u=Gre_Silver_Shield_Sword

It has been suggested that the fact that these 5,000 men are marching at the head of the army was meant to show Antiochus IV's intention of reforming the entire Seleucid army along Roman lines, though whether or not this complete reform actually took place is unknown.[14] The true extent of the adoption of Roman techniques is unknown, some have suggested that the infantry are in fact more likely to be Thureophoroi or Thorakitai, troops armed with an oval shield of the Celtic type, a thrusting spear and javelins.[15]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seleucid_army

One possible unit romanized is this

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thorakitai

The thorakitai (Greek: θωρακίται, singular: θωρακίτης, thorakites) were a type of soldier in Hellenistic armies similar to the thureophoroi. The literal translation of the term is "cuirassiers", which suggests that they may have worn a short Celtic mail shirt or possibly a linothorax.

Edited by Lion.Kanzen

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argyraspides

This does mention that while they might not have literally had silver shields, thr experimental thorakites were considered a part, and the eventual final form, of the Silver Shield Corps, who were the King's guard. Re-naming them to include the "silver shield" title would better reflect that they were intended to replace the phalangites as the silver shield corps.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argyraspides

This does mention that while they might not have literally had silver shields, thr experimental thorakites were considered a part, and the eventual final form, of the Silver Shield Corps, who were the King's guard. Re-naming them to include the "silver shield" title would better reflect that they were intended to replace the phalangites as the silver shield corps.

And yet keeping Thorakites Romaio or something like this also reference their possible Roman inspiration. All we know is that thwy were probably not called either of these thing.

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One could argue that the Roman influence is only in the principle, as the unit bears little resemblance to the pre-Marian or Marian Roman units.

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On 1/21/2016 at 3:16 AM, wowgetoffyourcellphone said:

And yet keeping Thorakites Romaio or something like this also reference their possible Roman inspiration. All we know is that thwy were probably not called either of these thing.

Also, the name of the ugrade to get them I believe is called Roman Reforms.  Its just a suggestion, but it would better differentiate them as a guard unit, then the slightly suped up Hastatus that their current name slightly suggests.

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On 9/12/2014 at 6:22 PM, GunChleoc said:

Maybe this page can help? http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hack_and_slash. It's about the genre, but you have terms for both "hack" and "slash" in there.

Here's a list of attack types I collected for my translation work - when you translate, make sure you find terms for the whole field. You should also look at how other games translate these terms, e.g. Battle for Wesnoth.

  • pierce -> perforar
  • piercing -> penetrante (as piercing damage, daño penetrante, so translated in Imperium, for example).
  • impact -> impacto
  • energy -> energía
  • arcane -> oscuro
  • cold -> frío
  • slashing -> cortante
  • ranged attack -> ataque a distancia
  • melee attack -> ataque cuerpo a cuerpo
  • blade -> hoja (sword part)
  • fire -> fuego
  • smash -> aplastar, as verbal infinitive; aplastamiento, as noun; daño aplastante for smashing damage.
  • gaze -> vista
  • glaive -> archa, soldier with glaive -> archero. Glaive/Archa is a high specific term for a polearm, polearm in general can be transleated as "arma de asta".
  • shield -> escudo
  • hack -> spanish doesn't stand out hack (cut with an axe) and slash. In order to use not the same word that i have used to slashing, i will translate "cercenar" as verb infinitive and "cercenamiento" as noun. For hacking damage I'd translate "daño por cercenamiento"
  • buckler -> broquel
  • shield bash -> golpe de escudo
  • naphtha attack -> literally it should be translated as " ataque con nafta" but it sounds horrible for a spanish speaker, so i suggest "ataque flamígero".
  • fire arrow -> "flecha de fuego" is a simply translation, more sophisticated can be "flecha ígnea" or "flecha flamígera". All three could be valid. I suggest "flecha de fuego".  If you mean a projectile fired from scorpion or another war machine heavier than an arch, you shouldn't use "flecha" but "virote", this is the word for the more heavier arrow shaped projectiles fired by scorpio, or oxybeles.

I hope it could help you.

I translate it to spanish. See supra.

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I have found a few of the missing specific names.

For the Ptolemies, blacksmith is kh-p-sh, farm field is m-r, temple is ḥwt-nṯr, and sentry tower can probably be the same as outpost.

For the Mauryans, sentry tower is Tārāṅgaṇa.

For the Romans, sentry tower is Catascopium.

For the Hellenes, sentry tower is Karavokyrós.

  • Like 3

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Well, kh-p-sh is their sickle swords, which a synonym for blacksmith's forge. m-r, or some variation of mar, is farm field from a scholarly book I found with Google. ḥwt-nṯr is from the Egyptian temple article on Wikipedia. The Egyptian word for outpost is the closest equivalent I can find for sentry tower. The Sanskrit (Mauryan) word for sentry tower was from the same Sanskrit website I have used in the past for Mauryan specific names. The Latin (Roman) and Greek words for sentry tower are from a scholarly book I also found with Google.

To round out the missing specific names, Attuna is the Phoenician word for furnace or chimney, the root word for Mount Etna, which is the best choice I have found for blacksmith for the Carthaginans.

 

Edited by Zeta1127
  • Like 2

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